Tag: Grid

The Holy Grail Layout with CSS Grid

A reader wrote in asking specifically how to build this layout in CSS Flexbox:

My answer: That’s not really a layout for CSS Flexbox. You could pull it off if you had to, but you’d need some kind of conceit, like grouping the nav and article together in a parent element (if not more grouping). CSS Grid was born to describe this kind of layout and it will be far easier to work with, not to mention that the browser support for both is largely the same these days.

What do you mean by “Holy Grail”?

See, kids, layout on the web used to be so janky that the incredible simple diagram above was relatively difficult to pull off, particularly if you needed the “columns” there to match heights. I know, ridiculous, but that was the deal. We used super weird hacks to get it done (like huge negative margins paired with positive padding), which evolved over time to cleaner tricks (like background images that mimicked columns). Techniques that did manage to pull it off referred to it as the holy grail. (Just for extra clarity, usually, holy grail meant a three-column layout with content in the middle, but the main point was equal height columns).

CSS is much more robust now, so we can use it without resorting to hacks to do reasonable things, like accomplish this basic layout.

Here it is in CSS Grid

This grid is set up both with grid-template-columns and grid-template-rows. This way we can be really specific about where we want these major site sections to fall.

I slipped in some extra stuff

  • I had another question come my way the other day about doing 1px lines between grid areas. The trick there is as simple as the parent having a background color and using gap: 1px;, so I’ve done that in the demo above.
  • It’s likely that small screens move down to a single-column layout. I’ve done that at a media query above. Sometimes I use display: block; on the parent, turning off the grid, but here I’ve left grid on and reset the columns and rows. This way, we still get the gap, and we can shuffle things around if needed.
  • Another recent question I was asked about is the subtle “body border” effect you can see in the demo above. I did it about as simple as possible, with a smidge of padding between the body and the grid wrapper. I originally did it between the body and the HTML element, but for full-page grids, I think it’s smarter to use a wrapper div than use the body for the grid. That way, third-party things that inject stuff into the body won’t cause layout weirdness.

The post The Holy Grail Layout with CSS Grid appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , ,

Native CSS Masonry Layout In CSS Grid

Rachel Andrew introducing the fact that masonry layout is going to be a thing in native CSS via CSS grid layout. The thing with masonry is that we can already do it for the most part, but there is just one thing that makes it hard: doing the vertical-staggering and having a left-to-right source order. So that’s what this new ability will solve in addition to it just being less hacky in general.

You can already test a partial implementation in Firefox Nightly by enabling layout.css.grid-template-masonry-value.enabled.

.container {   display: grid;   grid-template-columns: repeat(4, 1fr);   grid-template-rows: masonry; }

I like the grid-template-rows: masonry; syntax because I think it clearly communicates: “You aren’t setting these rows. In fact, there aren’t even really rows at all anymore, we’ll take care of that.” Which I guess means there are now rows to inherit in subgrid, which also makes sense.


The post Native CSS Masonry Layout In CSS Grid appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , ,
[Top]

Thinking Outside the Box with CSS Grid

Great tutorial from Alex Trost (based on some demos, like this one, from Andy Barefoot) showcasing how, while CSS grid has straight grid lines across and down, you can place items across grid lines creating a staggered effect that looks pretty rad. Grid-like, but it appears to align to diagonal lines rather than horizontal and vertical lines because of the staggering. And you still get all the flexibility of grid!

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink


The post Thinking Outside the Box with CSS Grid appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, ,
[Top]

grid-auto-flow : CSS Grid :: flex-direction : Flexbox

When setting a parent element to display: flex, its child elements align left-to-right like this:

Now, one of the neat things we can do with flexbox is change the direction so that child elements are stacked vertically on top of each other in a column. We can do that with the flex-direction property (or with the flex-flow shorthand):

Okay, cool. But how would I do something like this with CSS Grid? As in, let’s say I want all those child elements to be aligned like this:

1 3 5 7 -------- 2 4 6 8

…instead of this:

1 2 3 4 -------- 5 6 7 8

By default, when I set a parent element to use CSS Grid, the elements will be positioned left-to-right just like flexbox. In the example below I’m telling the grid to have 6 columns and 2 rows, then let the child elements fill up each column of the first row before they fill up the columns of the second. You know, standard line wrapping behavior.

.parent {   display: grid;   grid-template-columns: repeat(6, 1fr);   grid-template-rows: repeat(2, 150px);   gap: 20px; }

Basically what I want here is the opposite: I want our child elements to fill up column 1, row 1 and row 2, then move on to the next column. In other words, column wrapping! I know that if I create a grid with rows and columns I could individually place those elements into those positions. Like so:

.parent {   display: grid;   grid-template-columns: repeat(6, 1fr);   grid-template-rows: repeat(6, 150px); }  .child-1 {   grid-column: 1;   grid-row: 1; }  .child-2 {   grid-column: 1;   grid-row: 2; }  .child-3 {   grid-column: 2;   grid-row: 1; }  /* etc, etc. */

Okay, neat! This gets me what I want but it’s a giant pain having to individually set the position of each item. It feels like I’m using position: absolute and it doesn’t feel particularly smart. So what if I just wanted this layout to be done for me, so that each new child element would align into the correct spot…correctly?

What I’m asking for (I think) is this: is there a CSS Grid version of flex-direction: column?

Well, after searching around a bit, Rachel Andrew pointed me to the correct answer in her rather excellent playground, Grid by Example. And as you can see in this demo, Rachel shows us how to do just that:

Neato! Rachel does this with the grid-auto-flow property: it tells a grid container how to fill the unoccupied space with child elements. So I can do that just by writing this:

.parent {   display: grid;   grid-auto-flow: column;   /* set up columns and rows here */ }

By default, child elements of a grid will fill up each column until a row is filled, then it’ll flow into the next beneath it. This is why the default for grid-auto-flow is set to row because we’re filling up rows of the grid first. But if we set it to column, then each new element will fill up all the space of column 1 before moving on to column 2, etc.

.parent {   display: grid;   grid-auto-flow: column;   grid-template-columns: repeat(6, 1fr);   grid-template-rows: repeat(2, 150px); }

This is what the flow part of grid-auto-flow means and for the longest time I ignored the property because it seemed (don’t laugh) scary. Just reading the word grid-auto-flow is enough to make me want to shut off my laptop and walk into the ocean.

But! It’s a pretty useful property and makes a ton of sense, especially if you think of it as the CSS Grid version of flex-direction.


The post grid-auto-flow : CSS Grid :: flex-direction : Flexbox appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , ,
[Top]

Layoutit Grid: Learning CSS Grid Visually With a Generator

Layoutit Grid is an interactive open source CSS Grid generator. It lets you draw your designs and see the code as you go. You can interact with the code, add or remove track lines and drag them around to change the sizing — and you get to see the CSS and HTML change in real time!

Animated gif of the tool which is split into three columns: one that sets the number of grid rows and columns, one to name and visualize the layout, and the last to see the code.
Add some tracks and see how they’re made in CSS

When you are done with a layout, you can create a CodePen or grab the code to jumpstart your next project. The tool brings the code to the forefront, helping you learn CSS grid as you work directly with it.

CSS Grid is a whole new way of thinking about layouts

We can now create robust responsive layouts for our web experiences. We can finally learn to design with a coherent set of layout tools instead of memorizing piles of hacks to force elements into position.

Now, I’m not saying a generator like this excuses us from knowing the code we write. We should all learn how CSS Grid and Flexbox work. Even if your stronghold is JavaScript, having a solid foundation in CSS knowledge is a powerful ally when communicating your ideas. When sharing a prototype for a component, a UX interaction, or even an algorithm in an online sandbox, the way in which your work is presented can make a big the difference. The ability to develop proper layouts — and define the styles that create them — is fundamental.

Crafting layouts in CSS should not be a daunting task. CSS Grid is actually quite fun to use! For example, using named grid areas feels like an ASCII art version of drawing a design on a piece of paper. Lets create the layout of a photos app, a feed of pics and the people in them side by side for its main content and the typical header, footer and a config sidebar.

.photos-app {   /* For our app layout, lets place things in a grid */   display: grid;   /* We want 3 columns and 3 rows, and these are the responsive      track sizes using `fr` (fraction of the remaining space) */   grid-template-columns: 20% 1fr 1fr;   grid-template-rows: 0.5fr 1.7fr 0.3fr;   /* Let's separate our tracks a bit */   gap: 1em;   /* We now have 3x3 cells, here is where each section is placed */   grid-template-areas:     "header header header"  /* a header stretching in the top row */     "config photos people"  /* a left sidebar, and our app content */     "footer footer footer"; /* and a footer along the bottom row  */ } 
 .the-header {   /* In each section, let's define the name we use to refence the area */   grid-area: "header"; }

This is just a small subset of what you can build with CSS Grid. The spec is quite flexible. Areas can also be placed directly using line numbers or names, or they can be placed implicitly by the browser, with the content distributed inside the grid automatically. And the spec continues to grow with additions, like subgrid.

At the same time, working with grids can be difficult, just like anything that requires a new way of thinking. It takes a lot of time to wrap our heads around this sort of thing. And one way to help do that is to…

Learn while playing

When you are learning CSS Grid, it is easy to feel intimidated by its notation and semantics. Until you develop some muscle memory for it, kickstarting the learning process with visual and interactive tools can be an excellent way to overcome that early trepidation. A lot of us have used generators while learning how to create shadows, gradients, Markdown tables, and so on. Generators, if built with care, are great learning aids.

Let’s use Layoutit Grid to recreate the same design in our example.

Generators like this aren’t meant to be leaned on forever; they’re a stepping stone. This particular one helps you experience the power of CSS Grid by materializing your designs in a few clicks along with the code to make it happen. This gives you the early wins that you need to push forward with the learning process. For some of us, generators permanently remain in our toolboxes. Not because we do not know how to craft the layouts by hand, but because having the visual feedback loop help us to quickly convert our ideas into code. So we keep playing with them.

Sarah Drasner has also created a CSS Grid generator that’s worth checking out as well.

Learn by building

Leniolabs recently open-sourced Layoutit Grid and added new features, like interactive code views, area edition, history and offline support. And there are several more in the making.

If you have ideas to improve the tool, get in touch! Open an issue and let’s discuss it on GitHub. Going into meta territory, you can also learn about the CSS Grid spec by helping us build the tool. 

We use the app to keep track of best practices in creating performant interactive web experiences. It is now powered by the newly released Vue 3 using <script setup> components and built with Vite, a new dev tool that doesn’t bundle the app while developing, which gives us instant feedback during development. If you are curious and want to build with us, fork the repo and let’s learn together!


The post Layoutit Grid: Learning CSS Grid Visually With a Generator appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , , ,
[Top]

How to Use CSS Grid for Sticky Headers and Footers

CSS Grid is a collection of properties designed to make layout easier than it’s ever been. Like anything, there’s a bit of a learning curve, but Grid is honestly fun to work with once you get the hang of it. One area where it shines is dealing with headers and footers. With a little adjustment in our thinking, we can pull off headers and footers that behave like they are fixed, or have that “sticky” treatment (not position: sticky, but the kind of footer that hugs the bottom of the screen even if there isn’t enough content to push it there, and is pushed away with more content). 

Hopefully this sparks further interest in modern layouts, and if it does, I can’t recommend Rachel Andrew’s book The New CSS Layout strongly enough: it covers both of the major modern layout techniques, grid and flexbox.

What we’re making

Let’s implement a fairly classic HTML layout that consist of a header, main content and footer.

We’ll make a truly fixed footer, one that stays at the bottom of the viewport where the main content scrolls within itself, as needed, then later update the footer to be a more traditional sticky footer that starts at the bottom of the viewport, even if the main content is small, but gets pushed down as needed. Further, to broaden our exposure to grid, let’s design our main content holder so that it can either span the whole width of the viewport, or take up a nicely centered strip down the middle.

A fixed footer is slightly unusual. Footers are commonly designed to start at the bottom of the viewport, and get pushed down by main content as needed. But a persistent footer isn’t unheard of. Charles Schwab does it on their homepage. Either way, it’ll be fun to implement!

But before we move on, feel free to actually peek at the fixed footer implemented on the Charles Schwab site. Unsurprisingly, it uses fixed positioning, which means it has a hard-coded size. In fact, if we crack open DevTools, we see that right off the bat:

body #qq0 {   border-top: 4px solid #133568;   background-color: #eee;   left: 0;   right: 0;   bottom: 0;   height: 40px!important; }

Not only that, but there’s the balance of making sure the main content doesn’t get hidden behind that fixed footer, which it does by setting hard-coded paddings (including 15px on the bottom of the <footer> element), margins (including 20px on <ul> in the footer), and even line breaks.

Let’s try to pull this off without any of these restrictions.  

Our baseline styles

Let’s sketch out a bare minimum UI to get us started, then enhance our grid to match our goals. There’s a CodeSandbox below, plus additional ones for the subsequent steps that get us to the end result.

First, let’s do some prep work. We’ll make sure we’re using the whole height of the viewport, so when we add our grid, it’ll be easy to put the footer at the bottom (and keep it there).  There’s only going to be one element inside the document’s <body> with an ID of #app, which will hold the <header, <main> and <footer> elements.

body {   margin: 0; /* prevents scrollbars */ } 
 #app {   height: 100vh; }

Next, let’s set up our header, main, and footer sections, as well as the grid they’ll all sit in. To be clear, this will not work the way we want right out of the gate. It’s just to get us started, with a base to build from.

body {   margin: 0; } 
 #app {   height: 100vh;      /* grid container settings */   display: grid;   grid-template-columns: 1fr;   grid-template-rows: auto 1fr auto;   grid-template-areas:      'header'     'main'     'footer'; } 
 #app > header {   grid-area: header; } 
 #app > main {   grid-area: main;   padding: 15px 5px 10px 5px; } 
 #app > footer {   grid-area: footer; }

We’ve created a simple one-column layout, with a width of 1fr. If that 1fr is new to you, it essentially means “take the remaining space” which, in this case, is the entire width of the grid container, #app.

We’ve also defined three rows:

#app {   /* etc. */   grid-template-rows: auto 1fr auto;   /* etc. */ }

The first and third rows, which will be our header and footer, respectively, are sized with auto, which means they’ll take up as much space as needed. In other words: no need for hard-coded sizes! This is a super important detail and a perfect example of how we benefit from using CSS Grid.

The middle row is where we’ll put our content. We’ve assigned it a size of 1fr which, again, just means it takes up all of the remaining space that’s left over from the other two rows. If you’re wondering why we aren’t making it auto as well, it’s because the entire grid spans the viewport’s whole height, so we need one section to grow and fill up any unused space. Note that we do not have, nor will we ever need at any point, any fixed heights, margins, paddings — or even line breaks! — to push things into place. Such is the good life when working with grid!

Shall we try some content?

You’ll notice in the Sandbox that I used React to build this demo, but since this isn’t a post about React, I won’t belabor those details; React has absolutely nothing to do with any of the CSS Grid work in this post. I’m only using it as an easy way to navigate between different chunks of markup. If you hate React, that’s fine: hopefully you can ignore it in this post.

We have Header, Main and Footer components that render the expected <header> , <main>  and <footer> elements, respectively. And, of course, this all sits inside our #app container. Yes, in theory, #app should be an <article> element, semantically speaking, but that’s always looked weird to me. I just wanted to covey these details so we’re all one the same page as we plow ahead.

For the actual content, I have Billing and Settings sections that you can navigate between in the header. They both render fake, static content, and are only meant to show our layout in action. The Settings section will be the content that we put in a centered strip on our page, Billing will be the one that spans our whole page.

Here’s the Sandbox with what we have so far.

The Billing section looks good, but the Settings section pushes our footer off screen. Not only that, but if we scroll, the entire page scrolls, causing us to lose our header. That may be desirable in some cases, but we want both the header and footer to stay in view, so let’s fix that.

Fixed header, fixed footer

When we initially set up our grid, we gave it a height of 100vh, which is the entire height of the viewport. We then assigned the rows for the header and footer an auto height, and the main a height of 1fr to take up the remaining space. Unfortunately, when content exceeds the space available, it expanded beyond the viewport bounds, pushing our footer down and out of view.

The fix here is trivial: adding overflow: auto will cause our <main> element to scroll, while keeping our <header> and <footer> elements in place.

#app > main {   grid-area: main;   overflow: auto;   padding: 15px 5px 10px 5px; }

Here’s the updated demo that puts this to use.

Adjustable width main section

We want our <main> element to either span the whole width of the viewport, or be centered in a 600px space. You might think we could simply make <main> a 600px fixed width, with an auto margins on either side. But since this is a post about grid, let’s use moar grid. (Plus, as we’ll see later, a fixed width won’t work anyway).

To achieve our centered 600px element, we’ll actually make the <main> element a grid container. That’s right, a grid within a grid! Nesting grids is a totally legit approach, and will even get easier in the future when subgrid is officially supported across browsers. In this scenario, we’ll make <main> a grid with three column tracks of 1fr 600px 1fr or, stated simply, 600px in the middle, with the remaining space equally divided on the sides.

#app > main {   display: grid;   grid-template-rows: 1fr;   grid-template-columns: 1fr 600px 1fr; }

Now let’s position our the content in the grid. Our different modules all render in a <section> child. Let’s say that by default, content will occupy the middle section, unless it has a .full class, in which case it will span the entire grid width. We won’t use named areas here, and instead specify precise grid coordinates of the form [row-start] / [col-start] / [row-end] / [col-end]:

#app > section {   grid-area: 1 / 2 / 1 / 3; } 
 #app > section.full {   grid-area: 1 / 1 / 1 / 4 }

You might be surprised to see a col-end value of 4, given that there’s only three columns. This is because the column and row values are column and row grid lines. It takes four grid lines to draw three grid columns. 

Our <section> will always be in the first row, which is the only row. By default it’ll span column lines 2 through 3, which is the middle column, unless the section has a full class on it, in which case it’ll span column lines 1 through 4, which is all three columns.

Here’s an updated demo with this code. It’ll probably look good, depending on your CodeSandbox layout, but there’s still a problem. If you shrink the display to smaller than 600px, the content is abruptly truncated. We don’t really want a fixed 600px width in the middle. We want a width of up to 600px. It turns out grid has just the tool for us: the minmax() function. We specify a minimum width and a maximum width, and the grid will compute a value that falls in that range. That’s how we prevent the content from blowing out of the grid.

All we need to do is swap out that 600px value with minmax(0, 600px):

main {   display: grid;   grid-template-rows: 1fr;   grid-template-columns: 1fr minmax(0, 600px) 1fr; }

Here’s the demo for the finished code.

One more approach: The traditional fixed footer

Earlier, we decided to prevent the footer from being pushed off the screen and did that by setting the <main> element’s overflow property to auto.

But, as we briefly called out, that might be a desirable effect. In fact, it’s more of a classic “sticky” footer that solves that annoying issue, and places the footer on the bottom edge of the viewport when the content is super short.

Hey, get back to the bottom!

How could we keep all of our existing work, but allow the footer to get pushed down, instead of fixing itself to the bottom in persistent view?

Right now our content is in a grid with this HTML structure:

<div id="app">   <header />   <main>     <section />   </main>   <footer /> </div>

…where <main> is a grid container nested within the #app grid container, that contains one row and three columns that we use to position our module’s contents, which go in the <section> tag.

 Let’s change it to this:

<div id="app">   <header />   <main>     <section />     <footer />   </main> </div>

…and incorporate <footer> into the <main> element’s grid. We’ll start by updating our parent #app grid so that it now consists of two rows instead of three:

#app {   /* same as before */ 
   grid-template-columns: 1fr;   grid-template-rows: auto 1fr;   grid-template-areas:      'header'     'main'; }

Just two rows, one for the header, and the other for everything else. Now let’s update the grid inside our <main> element:

#app > main {   display: grid;   grid-template-rows: 1fr auto;   grid-template-columns: 1fr minmax(0, 600px) 1fr; }

We’ve introduced a new auto-sized row. That means we now have a 1fr row for our content, that holds our <section>, and an auto row for the footer.

Now we position our <footer> inside this grid, instead of directly in #app:

#app > footer {   grid-area: 2 / 1 / 2 / 4; }

Since <main> is the element that has scrolling, and since this element now has our footer, we’ve achieved the sticky footer we want! This way, if <main> has content that exceeds the viewport, the whole thing will scroll, and that scrolling content will now include our footer, which sits at the very bottom of the screen as we’d expect.

Here’s an updated demo. Note that the footer will be at the bottom of the screen if possible; otherwise it’ll scroll as needed. 

I made a few other small changes, like minor adjustments to paddings here and there; we can’t have any left or right paddings on <main>, because the <footer> would no longer go edge-to-edge.

I also made a last-minute adjustment during final edits to the <section> element—the one we enabled adjustable width content on. Specifically, I set its display to flex, its width to 100%, and its immediate descendant to overflow: auto. I did this so the <section> element’s content can scroll horizontally, within itself, if it exceeds our grid column boundary, but without allowing any vertical scrolling.

Without this change, the work we did would amount to the fixed footer approach we covered earlier. Making section> a flex container forces its immediate child — the <div> that contains the content — to take up all of the available vertical space. And, of course, setting that child div to overflow: auto enables scrolling. If you’re wondering why I didn’t just set the section’s overflow-x to auto, and overflow-y to visible, well, it turns out that’s not possible.

Parting thoughts 

We haven’t done anything revolutionary in this post, and certainly nothing that couldn’t be accomplished before CSS Grid. Our fixed width <main> container could have been a block element with a max-width value of 600px, and auto margins on the left and right. Our fixed footer could have been made with position: fixed (just make sure the main content doesn’t overlap with it). And, of course, there are various ways to get a more traditional “sticky footer.”

But CSS Grid provides a single, uniform layout mechanism to accomplish all of this, and it’s fun to work with — honestly fun. In fact, the idea of moving the footer from fixed to sticky wasn’t even something I planned at first. I threw it in at the last minute because I thought the post was a bit too light without it. It was trivial to accomplish, basically moving grid rows around, not unlike putting lego blocks together. And again, these UIs were trivial. Imagine how brightly grid will shine with more ambitious designs!


The post How to Use CSS Grid for Sticky Headers and Footers appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , ,
[Top]

To grid or not to grid

Sarah Higley does accessibility work and finds that “tables and grids are over-represented in accessibility bugs.”

The drum has been banged a million times: don’t use a <table> for layout. But what goes around comes around. What’s the the #1 item in a list of “some of the ways tables and grids can go wrong”?

Using a grid when a table is needed, or vice versa

The day has come. CSS grid has dug its way into usage so deeply that developers are using it by default instead of using a classic <table>. And we don’t even have flying cars yet!

Sarah shows clear examples of both techniques and how the same information can be presented in different ways both visually and semantically. For example, a list of upcoming concerts can be displayed as a <table>, and that might be fine if you can imagine the purpose of the table being used for sorting or comparing, but it can also be presented as a grid, which has other advantages, like headers that are easier to skim.

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink


The post To grid or not to grid appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

[Top]

Accordion Rows in CSS Grid

I’d bet grid-template-columns is used about 10× more than grid-template-rows, but maybe everyone has just been missing out. Eric Meyer chucks a bunch of row lines onto his main site layout grid like this:

grid-template-rows: repeat(7, min-content) 1fr repeat(3, min-content);

That way, if you need to use them they are they for you:

like this pattern. It feels good to me, having two sets of rows where the individual rows accordion open to accept content when needed, and collapse to zero height when not, with a “blank” row in between the sets that pushes them apart. It’s flexible, and even allows me to add more rows to the sets without having to rewrite all my layout styles.

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink


The post Accordion Rows in CSS Grid appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, ,
[Top]

Posters! (for CSS Flexbox and CSS Grid)

Any time I chat with a fellow web person and CSS-Tricks comes up in conversation, there is a good chance they’ll say: oh yeah, that guide on CSS flexbox, I use that all the time!

Indeed that page, and it’s cousin the CSS grid guide, are among our top trafficked pages. I try to take extra care with them making sure the information on them is current, useful, and the page loads speedily and properly. A while back, in a round of updates I was doing on the guides, I reached out to Lynn Fisher, who always does incredible work on everything, to see if she’d be up for re-doing the illustrations on the guides. Miraculously, she agreed, and we have the much more charismatic illustrations that live on the guides today.

In a second miracle, I asked Lynn again if she’d be up for making physical paper poster designs of the guides, and see agreed again! And so they live!

Here they are:

You better believe I have it right next to me in my office:

They are $ 25 each which includes shipping anywhere in the world.

The post Posters! (for CSS Flexbox and CSS Grid) appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, ,
[Top]

How-to guide for creating edge-to-edge color bars that work with a grid

Hard-stop gradients are one of my favorite CSS tricks. Here, Marcel Moreau combines that idea with CSS grid to solve an issue that’s otherwise a pain in the butt. Say you have like a 300px right sidebar on a desktop layout with a unique background color. Easy enough. But then say you want that background color to stretch to the right edge of the browser window even though the grid itself is width-constrained. Tricker.

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

The post How-to guide for creating edge-to-edge color bars that work with a grid appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , , , , , ,
[Top]