Tag: work

How to Work With WordPress Block Patterns

Just a little post I wrote up over at The Events Calendar blog. The idea is that a set of blocks can be grouped together in WordPress, then registered in a register_block_pattern() function that makes the group available to use as a “block pattern” in any page or post.

Block patterns are becoming upper-class citizens in the WordPress block editor. They were announced without much fanfare in WordPress 5.5 back in August, but have been given prominent real estate in the block inserter with its own tab next to blocks, including 10 or so default ones right out of the box.

Block patterns are sandwiched between Blocks and Reusable Blocks in the block inserter, which is a perfect metaphor for where it fits in the bigger picture of WordPress editing.

If the 5.6 Beta 3 release notes are any indication, then it looks like more patterns are on the way for default WordPress themes. And, of course, the block registration function has an unregister_block_pattern() companion should you need to opt out of any patterns.

What I find interesting is how the blocks ecosystem is evolving. We started with a set of default blocks that can be inserted into a post. We got reusable blocks that provide a way to assemble a group of blocks with consistent content across all pages of posts. Now we have a way to do the same, but in a much more flexible and editable way. The differences are subtle, but the use cases couldn’t be more different. We’ve actually been using reusable blocks here at CSS-Tricks for post explanations, like this:

We drop some text in here when we think there’s something worth calling out or that warrants a little extra explanation.

Any reusable block can be converted to a “regular” block. The styles are maintained but the content is not. That’s been our hack-y approach for speeding up our process around here, but now that block patterns are a thing, previous reusable blocks we’ve been using now make more sense as patterns.

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How-to guide for creating edge-to-edge color bars that work with a grid

Hard-stop gradients are one of my favorite CSS tricks. Here, Marcel Moreau combines that idea with CSS grid to solve an issue that’s otherwise a pain in the butt. Say you have like a 300px right sidebar on a desktop layout with a unique background color. Easy enough. But then say you want that background color to stretch to the right edge of the browser window even though the grid itself is width-constrained. Tricker.

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Why does writing matter in remote work?

Talk to anyone who has an active blog and I bet they’ll tell you it’s been valuable to them. Maybe it’s opened doors. Maybe it’s got them a job. Maybe it’s got them a conference invite. Maybe they just like the thrill of knowing people have read and responded to it. Maybe they learned a lot through its creation and maintenance.

Khoi Vinh said:

It’s hard to overstate how important my blog has been, but if I were to try to distill it down into one word, it would be: “amplifier.”

But what about other kinds of writing? Just day to day writing? Is that important for web workers? “Especially now”?

Tim Casasola:

In remote work, we communicate primarily through writing. We send messages in Slack. We document projects in Notion. We send meeting invites with a written description of the purpose. We’re writing all the time.

It’s just so damn important for team work of any kind, particularly when you aren’t next to each other physically.

While writing forces people to think clearly, writing also forces teams to think clearly. In my experience, having a clearly written thing makes it easy for folks to collaborate with me. This is because people naturally enjoy poking holes in arguments, adding points that were missed, or mentioning any risks that weren’t taken into account. I’ve found it helpful to use this human tendency to my advantage. Extra opinions and poked holes are hard to surface if you didn’t write something in the first place.

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How Auto Margins Work in Flexbox

Robin has covered this before, but I’ve heard some confusion about it in the past few weeks and saw another person take a stab at explaining it, and I wanted to join the party.

Say you have a flex container with some flex items inside that don’t fill the whole area.

See the Pen
ZEYLVEX
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

Now I want to push that “Menu” item to the far right. That’s where auto margins come in. If I put a margin-left: auto; on it, it’ll push as far away as it possibly can on that row.

See the Pen
WNbRLbG
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

Actually, you might consider margin-inline-start: auto; instead and start using logical properties everywhere so that you’re all set should you need to change direction.

See the Pen
gObgZpb
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

Also, note that auto margins work in both directions as long as there is room to push. In this example, it’s not alignment that is moving the menu down, it’s an auto margin.

See the Pen
XWJpobE
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

The post How Auto Margins Work in Flexbox appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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Footnotes That Work in RSS Readers

Feedbin is the RSS reader I’m using at the moment. I was reading one of Harry’s blog posts on it the other day, and I noticed a nice little interactive touch right inside Feedbin. There was a button-looking element with the number one which, as it turned out, was a footnote. I hovered over it, and it revealed the note.

The HTML for the footnote on the blog post itself looks like this:

<p>...they’d managed to place 27.9MB of images onto the Critical Path.  Almost 30MB of previously non-render blocking assets had just been  turned into blocking ones on purpose with no escape hatch. Start  render time was as high as 27.1s over a cable connection<sup id="fnref:1"> <a href="#fn:1" class="footnote">1</a></sup>.</p>

Just an anchor link that points to #fn:1, and the <sup> makes it look like a footnote link. This is how the styling would look by default:

The HTML for the list of footnotes at the bottom of the blog post looks like this:

<div class="footnotes">   <ol>     <li id="fn:1">      <p>5Mb up, 1Mb down, 28ms RTT.&nbsp;<a href="#fnref:1" class="reversefootnote">&#x21a9;</a></p>     </li>   </ol> </div>

As a little side note, I notice Harry is using scroll-behavior to smooth the scroll. He’s also got some nice :target styling in there.

All in all, we have:

  1. a link to go down and read the note
  2. a link to pop back up

Nothing special there. No fancy libraries or anything. Just semantic HTML. That should work in any RSS reader, assuming they don’t futz with the hash links and maintain the IDs on the elements as written.

It’s Feedbin that sees this markup pattern and decides to do the extra UI styling and fancy interaction. By inspecting what’s going on, it looks like they hide the originals and replace them with their own special stuff:

Ah ha! A Bigfoot spotting! It’s right in their source.

That means they fire off Bigfoot when articles are loaded and it does the trick. Like this:

See the Pen
Bigfoot Footnotes
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

That said, it’s based on an already functional foundation. Lemme end this with that same markup pattern, and I’ll try to look at it in different RSS readers to see what they do. Feel free to report what it does in your RSS reader of choice in the comments, if it does anything at all.


Azul is an abstract board game designed by Michael Kiesling and released by Plan B Games1 in 2017. From two to four players collect tiles to fill up a 5×5 player board. Players collect tiles by taking all the tiles of one color from a repository, and placing them in a row, taking turns until all the tiles for that round are taken. At that point, one tile from every filled row moves over to each player’s 5×5 board, while the rest of the tiles in the filled row are discarded. Each tile scores based on where it is placed in relation to other tiles on the board. Rounds continue until at least one player has made a row of tiles all the way across their 5×5 board.

  1. Plan B makes other cool games like Century and Reef. 

The post Footnotes That Work in RSS Readers appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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Deliver your best work with the help of monday.com

(This is a sponsored post.)

Here’s the situation: You’ve bashed out a complicated design over two weeks of near full-time effort, gotten everything down to the exact spec of the design file, turn it in for stakeholder review and… you’re way off scope. Turns out a few folks on the team put their heads together, made some changes, and never sent you an updated comp.

Boo!

The unfortunate truth is that this happens all too often in front-end development, but it’s really no one person’s fault because it boils down to simple collective miscommunication and a lack of transparency on the team.

Well, that’s where a project management platform like monday.com comes into play. Even if you’re on a remote team or sitting in an office with cubicle walls up to the ceiling, monday.com bridges gaps and tears down walls that could throw a project off-track. With powerful and intuitive tools, like instant messaging for those ad hoc meetings, file storage for a centralized repository of assets, and an activity dashboard for catching up on the status of a project at a glance, monday.com brings project out into the light so everyone is in the loop and on the same page.

(more…)

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[Top]

Deliver your best work with the help of monday.com

(This is a sponsored post.)

Here’s the situation: You’ve bashed out a complicated design over two weeks of near full-time effort, gotten everything down to the exact spec of the design file, turn it in for stakeholder review and… you’re way off scope. Turns out a few folks on the team put their heads together, made some changes, and never sent you an updated comp.

Boo!

The unfortunate truth is that this happens all too often in front-end development, but it’s really no one person’s fault because it boils down to simple collective miscommunication and a lack of transparency on the team.

Well, that’s where a project management platform like monday.com comes into play. Even if you’re on a remote team or sitting in an office with cubicle walls up to the ceiling, monday.com bridges gaps and tears down walls that could throw a project off-track. With powerful and intuitive tools, like instant messaging for those ad hoc meetings, file storage for a centralized repository of assets, and an activity dashboard for catching up on the status of a project at a glance, monday.com brings project out into the light so everyone is in the loop and on the same page.

(more…)

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