Tag: Videos

Weekly Platform News: WebKit autofill, Using Cursor Pointer, Delaying Autoplay Videos

In this week’s roundup, WebKit’s prefixed autofill becomes a standard, the pointer cursor is for more than just links, and browsers are jumping on board to delay videos set to autoplay until they’re in view… plus more! Let’s jump right into it.

CSS ::-webkit-autofill has become a standard feature

Chrome, Safari, and pretty much every other modern web browser except Firefox (more on that later) have supported the CSS :-webkit-autofill pseudo-class for many years. This selector matches form fields that have been autofilled by the browser. Websites can use this feature to style autofilled fields in CSS (with some limitations) and detect such fields in JavaScript.

let autofilled = document.querySelectorAll(":-webkit-autofill");

There currently does not exist a standard autocomplete or autofill event that would fire when the browser autofills a form field, but you can listen to the input event on the web form and then check if any of its fields match the :-webkit-autofill selector.

The HTML Standard has now standardized this feature by adding :autofill (and :-webkit-autofill as an alias) to the list of pseudo-classes that match HTML elements. This pseudo-class will also be added to the CSS Selectors module.

The :autofill and :-webkit-autofill pseudo-classes must match <input> elements that have been autofilled by the user agent. These pseudo-classes must stop matching if the user edits the autofilled field.

Following standardization, both pseudo-classes have been implemented in Firefox and are expected to ship in Firefox 86 later this month.

In the article “Let’s Bring Spacer GIFs Back!” Josh W. Comeau argues for using a “spacer” <span> element instead of a simple CSS margin to define the spacing between the icon and text of a button component.

In our home-button example, should the margin go on the back-arrow, or the text? It doesn’t feel to me like either element should “own” the space. It’s a distinct layout concern.

CSS Grid is an alternative to such spacer elements. For example, the “Link to issue” link in CSS-Tricks’s newsletter section contains two non-breaking spaces (&nbsp;) to increase the spacing between the emoji character and text, but the link could instead be turned into a simple grid layout to gain finer control over the spacing via the gap property.

The CSS Basic User Interface module defines the CSS cursor property, which allows websites to change the type of cursor that is displayed when the user hovers specific elements. The specification has the following to say about the property’s pointer value:

The cursor is a pointer that indicates a link. … User agents must apply cursor: pointer to hyperlinks. … Authors should use pointer on links and may use on other interactive elements.

Accordingly, browsers display the pointer cursor (rendered as a hand) on links and the default cursor (rendered as an arrow) on buttons. However, most websites (including Wikipedia) don’t agree with this default style and apply cursor: pointer to other interactive elements, such as buttons and checkboxes, as well.

Another interactive element for which it makes sense to use the pointer cursor is the <summary> element (the “toggle button” for opening and closing the parent <details> element).

Browsers delay autoplay until the video comes into view

Compared to modern video formats, animated GIF images are up to “twice as expensive in energy use.” For that reason, browsers have relaxed their video autoplay policies (some time ago) to encourage websites to switch from GIFs to silent or muted videos.

<!-- a basic re-implementation of a GIF using <video> --> <video autoplay loop muted playsinline src="meme.mp4"></video>

If you’re using <video muted autoplay>, don’t worry about pausing such videos when they’re no longer visible in the viewport (e.g., using an Intersection Observer). All major browsers (except Firefox) already perform this optimization by default:

<video autoplay> elements will only begin playing when visible on-screen such as when they are scrolled into the viewport, made visible through CSS, and inserted into the DOM.

(via Zach Leatherman)

Chrome introduces three new @font-face descriptors

Different browsers and operating systems sometimes use different font metrics even when rendering the same font. These differences affect the vertical position of text, which is especially noticeable on large headings.

Similarly, the different font metrics of a web font and its fallback font can cause a layout shift when the fonts are swapped during page load.

To help websites avoid layout shift and create interoperable text layouts, Chrome recently added the following three new CSS @font-face descriptors for overriding the font’s default metrics:

  • ascent-override (ascent is the height above the baseline)
  • descent-override (descent is the depth below the baseline)
  • line-gap-override
@font-face {   font-family: Roboto;   /* Merriweather Sans has 125.875px ascent     * and 35px descent at 128px font size.    */   ascent-override: calc(125.875 / 128 * 100%);   descent-override: calc(35 / 128 * 100%);   src: local(Roboto-Regular); }

The following video shows how overriding the ascent and descent metrics of the fallback font (Roboto) to match the same metrics of the web font (Merriweather Sans) can avoid layout shift when swapping between these two fonts.


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Some Recent Videos About Websites That Are Pretty Good

Here’s a little hodgepodge of videos I’ve recently bookmarked (and watched). I couldn’t decide if each one of them should be a separate blog post or if I should do this combined list post thing. If I had a lot more to say about each video I would have split them off, but I went with the combined post and fewer words here. Let me know in the comments if you have a preference on that kind of thing.

Here’s Tom Scott explaining why the web is such a mess

Cookies. It all cookies fault. Kinda. Also humans.

This is the same Tom that did that super neat video that updated it’s own title with the view count.

I don’t know this person’s name but I appreciated how it gets the details right in this recreation of the Discord sidebar

Except the fact that the :hover was on the <li> itself rather than a link that went somewhere sensible, but hey, I guess it’s slightly better than the actual Discord markup where it’s <div class="listItem_">.

Heydon gets all weird about progressive enhancment

I can’t embed it here because, even though it looks like Heydon switched over to Vimeo rather than just straight up <video> tags, the privacy settings have it locked to briefs.video only.

I liked the point about “the basic layout is not a broken layout,” except, doesn’t it seem like in that exact case it wouldn’t matter if you wrapped the grid-template-rows in a @supports or not? I love that @supports is a thing, and even more so now that we’ve passed the awkward years where @supports itself didn’t have full browser support, but I don’t find myself reaching for it that much, as it’s only really useful if you need to do something different than “just let it not work,” which I don’t find terribly common.

Houssein Djirdeh and Jason Miller get into “modern JavaScript”

We’ve gotta be so careful about compiled code. There is an example where one line of JavaScript gets compiled into 7000 bytes, which is bigger and far slower than intended. Taking care of older browsers when you have a significant number of users using that old browser is a really great thing, but you might be surprised at the browser support of “modern JavaScript” and find you are compiling more than you need to.

The kicker is that you only really control what you write, but probably most of what you ship is third-party. That means npm, which is absolutely loaded with very non-modern JavaScript. The sweet spot, they say, is calling ES 2017 the compile target in general. If you need even older support, use the ol’ differential serving trick.

There’s a blog version of this video, too.

Jessica Chan challenges William Candillon to a CSSBattle

Like literally CSSBattle, the website.

They go back and forth trying to figure out how to make this little spiky virus-looking thing. I totally relate to their approaches! Neither of them are like amazingly clever with either the HTML or CSS — they just try to get it done. That’s why I could never get into CSSBattle myself. I appreciate people’s trickery (duh), but my actual CSS writing style is almost like verbose-on-purpose.


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Five 5-minute Videos from Ethan on Design & Accessibility

Ethan:

I’ve been working with Aquent Gymnasium to produce a series of five short tutorial videos, which have been launching over the course of this past week. Since the last video just went live, I’m thrilled to share the whole list with you:

Introduction to using VoiceOver on macOS
Designing beautiful focus states
Flexible and accessible typesetting
Responsively designing with viewport units
Designing beautiful and accessible drop caps

Five minutes is a real sweet spot for a how-to video. Ain’t no time to screw around. I loved every minute of these.

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I’m getting back to making videos

It’s probably one part coronavirus, one part new-fancy-video setup, and one part “hey this is good for CodePen too,” but I’ve been doing more videos lately. It’s nice to be back in the swing of that for a minute. There’s something fun about coming back to an old familiar workflow.

Where do the videos get published? I’m a publish-on-your-own site kinda guy, as I’m sure you know, so there is a whole Videos section of this site where every video we’ve ever published lives. There is also a YouTube channel, of course, which is probably the most practical way for most people to subscribe. We’re about halfway to Wes Bos-level, so let’s go people!

I had literally forgotten about it, but ages ago when I set this up, I created a special RSS feed for the videos so I could submit it as a video podcast on iTunes. That’s all still there and working! An interesting side note is that this enables offline viewing, as most podcatchers can cache subscriptions. Why build an app when you get the core ability for free, right?

I keep the original videos, of course. On individual video pages, I show a YouTube player that could be somewhat easily swapped out for another player if something crazy happened, like YouTube closes down or drastically changed their business model in some way that makes it problematic to show videos with their player. The originals are stored in an S3 bucket. If you’re an MVP Supporter, I give you the original high-quality download link right on the video pages.

If your curious about my workflow, I’m still using ScreenFlow. I don’t make nearly enough use of it, but it feels good in that it’s fairly easy to use, very reliable and fast, and I can always learn and do more with it. Shooting my screen is easy and a built-in feature of ScreenFlow of course. I also have a Rode Podcaster on a boom arm at my desk so the audio is passable. And I just went through a whole process to use a DSLR camera at my desk too, and I think the quality from that is great. It’s all a little funny because I have this whole sound recording booth as well, with a $ 1,000 audio setup in there, but I only use that for podcasting. The lighting sucks in there, making it no good for video.

It’s this new desk setup that has inspired me to do more video, and I suspect it will continue! One thing I could really use is a new high quality intro video. Just like a five-second thing with refreshed aesthetics. Anyone do that kind of work?

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Weekly Platform News: Layout Shifts, Stalled High-Bitrate Videos, Screenshots in Firefox

In this week’s roundup: fighting shifty layouts, some videos might be a bit stalled, and a new way to take screenshots in Firefox.

Let’s get into the news!

Identifying the causes of layout shifts during page load

You can now use WebPageTest to capture any layout shifts that occur on your website during page load, and identify what caused them.

Step 1: Paste a snippet

Paste the following snippet into the “Custom Metrics” on webpagetest.org in field in the Custom tab (under Advanced Settings) and make sure that a Chrome browser is selected.

[LayoutShifts] return new Promise(resolve => {   new PerformanceObserver(list => {     resolve(JSON.stringify(list.getEntries().filter(entry => !entry.hadRecentInput)));   }).observe({type: "layout-shift", buffered: true}); });

Step 2: Inspect entries

After completing the test, inspect the captured LayoutShifts entries on the Custom Metrics page, which is linked from the Details section.

Step 3: Check the filmstrip

Based on the "startTime" and "value" numbers in the data, use WebPageTest’s filmstrip view to pinpoint the individual layout shifts and identify their causes.

(via Rick Viscomi)

A high bitrate can cause your videos to stall

If you serve videos for your website from your own web server, keep an eye on the video bitrate (the author suggests FFmpeg and streamclarity.com). If your video has a bitrate of over 1.5 Mbps, playback may stall one or more times for people on 3G connections, depending on the video’s length.

50% of videos in this study have a bitrate that is greater than the downlink speed of a 3G connection — meaning that video playback will be delayed and contain stalls.

(via Doug Sillars)

Firefox’s :screenshot command

Firefox’s DevTools console includes a powerful command for capturing screenshots of the current web page. Like in Chrome DevTools, you can capture a screenshot of an individual element, the current viewport, or the full page, but Firefox’s :screenshot command also provides advanced options for adjusting the device pixel ratio and setting a delay.

// capture a full-page screenshot at a device pixel ratio of 2 :screenshot --fullpage --dpr 2  // capture a screenshot of the viewport with a 5-second delay :screenshot --delay 5

(via Reddit)


Read even more news in my weekly Sunday issue, which can be delivered to you via email every Monday morning.

Web Platform News: Sunday issue →

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8 Little Videos About the Firefox Shape Path Editor

It sometimes takes a quick 35 seconds for a concept to really sink in. Mikael Ainalem delivers that here, in the case that you haven’t quite grokked the concepts behind path-based CSS properties like clip-path and shape-outside.

Here are two of my favorites. The first demonstrates animating text into view using a polygon as a clip.

The second shows how the editor can help morph one shape into another.

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