Tag: tiny

Cash (Tiny jQuery Alternative)

The README for Cash is straightforward:

Cash is an absurdly small jQuery alternative for modern browsers (IE11+) that provides jQuery-style syntax for manipulating the DOM. Utilizing modern browser features to minimize the codebase, developers can use the familiar chainable methods at a fraction of the file size. 100% feature parity with jQuery isn’t a goal, but Cash comes helpfully close, covering most day to day use cases.

6 KB minified and gzipped, which is even smaller than Zepto. Zepto’s whole point was a smaller jQuery, but it hasn’t been touched in a bunch of years, so there is that too.

I wonder how much smaller Cash would be if it dropped IE 11 support.

jQuery is still huuuuugggggeeee, only just recently having peaked in usage and showing signs of decline. That must be because it comes on most WordPress sites, right?! That’s like 42% of all sites right there.

Anyway, if you tend to reach for jQuery just for some convincing, Cash looks like a nice alternative. I don’t blame you either. Typing $ instead of document.querySelectorAll still feels good to me, not to mention all the other fanciness tucked behind that dollar sign function.

Also worth mentioning: if you’re looking to straight-up remove jQuery from a project, replace-jquery might be worth a look:

Automatically find jQuery methods from existing projects and generate vanilla js alternatives.


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My tiny side project has had more impact than my decade in the software industry

That’s a heartwrenching title from Michael Williamson. I believe it though. It’s kinda like a maximized version of the blogging phenomenon where if you work on a post for weeks it’ll flop compared to a post that’s some dumb 20-minute thought. Or how your off-handed remark to some developer at the perfect time might cause some huge pivot in what they are doing, changing the course of a project forever. For Mike, it was a 3,000 line-of-code side project that had more impact on the world than a career of work as a software developer.

I’ve tried to pick companies working on domains that seem useful: developer productivity, treating diseases, education. While my success in those jobs has been variable – in some cases, I’m proud of what I accomplished, in others I’m pretty sure my net effect was, at best, zero – I’d have a tough time saying that the cumulative impact was greater than my little side project.

Impact is fuzzy though, isn’t it? I don’t know Mike, but assuming he is a kind and helpful person, think of all the people he’s likely helped along the way. Not by just saving them minutes of toil, but helped. Helped grow, helped through hard times, helped guide to where they ought to go. Those things are immeasurable and awfully important.

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Super Tiny Icons

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Parsel: A tiny, permissive CSS selector parser

If you’ve ever thought to yourself, gosh, self, I wish I could have an Abstract Syntax Tree (AST) of this CSS selector, Lea has your back.

If you’ve ever thought that same thing for an entire CSS file, that’s what PostCSS is, which has gone v8. PostCSS doesn’t do anything by itself, remember. It just makes an AST out of CSS and gives it a plugin interface so plugins can be written to transform CSS with it. No shade on PostCSS, but it is funny how saying “We use PostCSS” doesn’t mean anything the way “We use Sass” does.

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