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“All these things are quite easy to do, they just need somebody to sit down and just go through the website”

I saw a video posted on Twitter from Channel 5 News in the UK (I have no idea what the credibility of them is, it’s an ocean away from me) with anchor Claudia Liza asking Glen Turner and Kristina Barrick questions about website accessibility.

Apparently, they often post videos with captions, but this particular video doesn’t (ironically). So, I’ve transcribed it here as I found them pretty well-spoken.

[Claudia Liza]: … you do have a visual impairment. How does that make it difficult for you to shop online?

[Glen Turner]: Well, I use various special features on my devices to shop online to make it easier. So, I enlarge the text, I’ll invert the colors to make the background dark so that I don’t have glare. I will zoom in on pictures, I will use speech to read things to me because it’s too difficult sometimes. But sometimes websites and apps aren’t designed in a way that is compatible with that. So sometimes the text will be poorly contrasted so you’ll have things like brown on black, or red on black, or yellow on white, something like that. Or the menu system won’t be very easy to navigate, or images won’t have descriptions for the visually impaired because images can have descriptions embedded that a speech reader will read back to them. So all these various factors make it difficult or impossible to shop on certain websites.

[Claudia Liza]: What do you need retailers to do? How do they need to change their technology on their websites and apps to make it easier?

It’s quite easy to do a lot of these things, really. Check the colors on your website. Make sure you’ve got light against dark and there is a very clear distinctive contrast. Make sure there are descriptions for the visually impaired. Make sure there are captions on videos for the hearing impaired. Make sure your menus are easy to navigate and make it easy to get around. All these things are quite easy to do, they just need somebody to sit down and just go through the website and check that it’s all right and consult disabled people as well. Ideally, you’ve got disabled people in your organization you employ, but consult the wider disabled community as well. There is loads of us online there is loads of us spread all over the country. There is 14 million of us you can talk to, so come and talk to us and say, “You know, is our website accessible for you? What can we do to improve it?” Then act on it when we give you our advice.

[Claudia Liza]: It makes sense doesn’t it, Glen? It sounds so simple. But Christina, it is a bit tricky for retailers. Why is that? What do other people with disabilities tell you?

So, we hear about content on websites being confusing in the way it’s written. There’s lots of information online about how to make an accessible website. There’s a global minimum legal standard called WCAG and there’s lot of resources online. Scope has their own which has loads of information on how to make your website accessible.

I think the problem really is generally lack of awareness. It doesn’t get spoken about a lot. I think that disabled consumers – there’s not a lot of places to complain. Sometimes they’ll go on a website and there isn’t even a way to contact that business to tell them that their website isn’t accessible. So what Scope is trying to do is raise the voices of disabled people. We have crowdsourced a lot of people’s feedback on where they experience inaccessible websites. We’re raising that profile and trying to get businesses to change.

[Claudia Liza]: So is it legal when retails aren’t making their websites accessible?

Yeah, so, under the Equality Act 2010, it’s not legal to create an inaccessible website, but what we’ve found is that government isn’t generally enforcing that as a law.

[Claudia Liza]: Glenn, do you feel confident that one day you’ll be able to buy whatever you want online?

I would certainly like to think that would be the case. As I say, you raise enough awareness and get the message out there and alert business to the fact that there is a huge consumer market among the disabled community, and we’ve got a 274 billion pound expenditure a year that we can give to them. Then if they are aware of that, then yeah, hopefully they will open their doors to us and let us spend our money with them.

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Become a Front-End Master in 2020 With These 10 Project Ideas

This is a little updated cross-post from a quickie article I wrote on DEV. I’m publishing here ‘cuz I’m all IndieWeb like that.

I love this post by Simon Holdorf. He’s got some ideas for how to level up your skills as a front-end developer next year. Here they are:

  • Build a movie search app using React
  • Build a chat app with Vue
  • Build a weather app with Angular
  • Build a to-do app with Svelte

… and 5 more like that.

All good ideas. All extremely focused on JavaScript frameworks.
I like thinking of being a front-end developer as being someone who is a browser person. You deal with people who use some kind of client to use the web on some kind of device. That’s the job.

I love JavaScript frameworks, but knowing them isn’t what makes you a good front-end developer. Being performance-focused and accessibility-focused, and thus user-focused is what makes you a front-end master, beyond executing the skills required to get the website built.

In that vein, here’s some more ideas.

  • Go find a Dribbble shot that appeals to you. Re-build it in HTML and CSS in the cleanest and most accessible way you can.
  • Find a component you can abstract in your codebase, and abstract it so you can re-use it efficiently. Consider accessibility as you do it. Could you make it more accessible in a way that benefits the entire site? How about your SVG icon component — how’s that looking these days?
  • Try out a static site generator (perhaps one that isn’t particularly JavaScript focused, just to experience it). What could the data source be? What could you make if you ran the build process on a timed schedule?
  • Install the Axe accessibility plugin for DevTools and run it on an important site you control. Make changes to improve the accessibility as it suggests.
  • Spin up a copy of Fractal. Check out how it can help you think about building front-ends as components, even at the HTML and CSS level.
  • Build a beautiful form in HTML/CSS that does something useful for you, like receive leads for freelance work. Learn all about form validation and see how much you can do in just HTML, then HTML plus some CSS, then with some vanilla JavaScript. Make the form work by using a small dedicated service.
  • Read a bit about Serverless and how it can extend your front-end developer skillset.
  • Figure out how to implement an SVG icon system. So many sites these days need an icon set. Inlining SVG is a great simple solution, but how you can abstract that to easily implement it with your workflow? How can it work with the framework you use?
  • Try to implement a service worker. Read a book about them. Do something very small. Check out a framework centered around them.
  • Let’s say you needed to put up a website where the entire thing was the name and address of the company, and a list of hours it is open. What’s the absolute minimum amount of work and technical debt you could incur to do it?

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