Tag: subgrid

Weekly Platform News: Web Apps in Galaxy Store, Tappable Stories, CSS Subgrid

In this week’s roundup: Firefox gains locksmith-like powers, Samsung’s Galaxy Store starts supporting Progressive Web Apps, CSS Subgrid is shipping in Firefox 70, and a new study confirms that users prefer to tap into content rather than scroll through it.

Let’s get into the news.

Securely generated passwords in Firefox

Firefox now suggests a securely generated password when the user focuses an <input> element that has the autocomplete="new-password" attribute value. This option is also available via the context menu on any password field.


(via The Firefox Frontier)

Web apps in Samsung’s app store

Samsung has started adding Progressive Web Apps (PWA) to its app store, Samsung Galaxy Store, which is available on Samsung devices. The new “Web apps” category is visible initially only in the United States. If you own a PWA, you can send its URL to pwasupport@samsung.com, and Samsung will help you get onboarded into Galaxy Store.

(via Ada Rose Cannon)

Tappable stories on the mobile web

According to a study commissioned by Google, the majority of people prefer tappable stories over scrolling articles when consuming content on the mobile web. Google is using this study to promote AMP Stories, which is a format for tappable stories on the mobile web.

Both studies had participants interact with real-world examples of tappable stories on the mobile web as well as scrolling article equivalents. Forrester found that 64% of respondents preferred the tappable mobile web story format over its scrolling article equivalent.

(via Alex Durán)

The grid form use-case for CSS Subgrid

CSS Subgrid is shipping in Firefox next month. This new feature enables grid items of nested grids to be put onto the outer grid, which is useful in situations where the wanted grid items are not direct children of the grid container.

(via Šime Vidas)

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Hello Subgrid!

Rachel Andrew’s talk at CSSconf is wonderful because it digs into one of the most exciting changes that’s coming soon to a browser near you: subgrid! That’s a change to the CSS Grid spec that allows for much greater flexibility for our visual designs. Subgrid allows us to set one grid on an entire page and let child elements use that very same grid tracks.

The reason why I’m very excited is because this solves one of the most annoying visual layout issues that I’ve come across since becoming a web developer, and if that sounds bonkers and/or wonderful to you, then make sure to check out Rachel’s talk because she does a much better job of describing this than I possibly could:

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Why we need CSS subgrid

I’m a huge fan of CSS Grid and I use it on pretty much every project these days. However, there’s one part of it that makes things much more complicated than they really ought to be: the lack of subgrids. And in this post on the matter, Ken Bellows explains why they’d be so gosh darn useful:

But one thing still missing from the Level 1 spec is the ability to create a subgrid, a grid-item with its own grid that aligns in one or both dimensions with the parent grid. It was originally planned to be in Level 1, but the working group decided they needed more time to work out the details, so it was removed, and it will ship in CSS Grid Layout Module Level 2, which seems to be nearing completion.

There has been a lot of discussion over the last 2 years about the use cases for subgrid, how it should be implemented, and even some debate over whether you even need it. A lot of that discussion was centered around two other approaches that can handle many of the same problems as subgrid: nested grids and display: contents

I remember one of the very first websites I worked on was much like the demo that Ken uses as an example, but this was way back in 2012 and grid didn’t exist yet. Sadly, I had to write a lot more CSS than I felt was necessary to get elements in one div to line up with elements in another. Anyway, this article kinda riffs off of Rachel Andrew’s post about subgrid and what problems it would help solve which is definitely worth checking out, too.

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