Tag: Some

Some Hands-On with the HTML Dialog Element

This is me looking at the HTML <dialog> element for the first time. I’ve been aware of it for a while, but haven’t taken it for a spin yet. It has some pretty cool and compelling features. I can’t decide for you if you should use it in production on your sites, but I’d think it’s starting to be possible.

It’s not just a semantic element, it has APIs and special CSS.

We’ll get to that stuff in a moment, but it’s notable because it makes the browser support stuff significant.

When we first got HTML5 elements like <article>, it pretty much didn’t matter if the browser supported it or not because nothing was worse-off in those scenarios if you used it. You could make it block-level and it was just like a meaningless div you would have used anyway.

That said, I wouldn’t just use <dialog> as a “more semantic <div> replacement.” It’s got too much functionality for that.

Let’s do the browser support thing.

As I write:

  • Chrome’s got it (37+), so Edge is about to get it.
  • Firefox has the User-Agent (UA) styles in place (69+), but the functionality is behind a dom.dialog_element.enabled flag. Even with the flag, it doesn’t look like we get the CSS stuff yet.
  • No support from Safari.

It’s polyfillable.

It’s certainly more compelling to use features with a better support than this, but I’d say it’s close and it might just cross the line if you’re the polyfilling type anyway.

On to the juicy stuff.

A dialog is either open or not.

<dialog>   I'm closed. </dialog>  <dialog open>   I'm open. </dialog>

There is some UA styling to them.

It seems to match in Chrome and Firefox. The UA stylesheet has it centered with auto margins, thick black lines, sized to content.

See the Pen
Basic Open Dialog
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

Like any UA styles, you’ll almost surely override them with your own fancy dialog styles — shadows and typography and whatever else matches your site’s style.

There is a JavaScript API for opening and closing them.

Say you have a reference to the element named dialog:

dialog.show(); dialog.hide();

See the Pen
Basic Togglable Dialog
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

You should probably use this more explicit command though:

dialog.showModal();

That’s what makes the backdrop work (and we’ll get to that soon). I’m not sure I quite grok it, but the the spec talks about a “pending dialog stack” and this API will open the modal pending that stack. Here’s a modal that can open a second stacking modal:

See the Pen
Basic Open Dialog
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

There’s also an HTML-based way close them.

If you put a special kind of form in there, submitting the form will close the modal.

<form method="dialog">   <button>Close</button> </form>

See the Pen
Dialog with Form that Closes Dialog
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

Notice that if you programmatically open the dialog, you get a backdrop cover.

This has always been one of the more finicky things about building your own dialogs. A common UI pattern is to darken the background behind the dialog to focus attention on the dialog.

We get that for free with <dialog>, assuming you open it via JavaScript. You control the look of it with the ::backdrop pseudo-element. Instead of the low-opacity black default, let’s do red with stripes:

See the Pen
Custom Dialog Backdrop
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

Cool bonus: you can use backdrop-filter to do stuff like blur the background.

See the Pen
Native Dialog
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

It moves focus for you

I don’t know much about this stuff, but I can fire up VoiceOver on my Mac and see the dialog come into focus see that when I trigger the button that opens the modal.

It doesn’t trap focus there, and I hear that’s ideal for modals. We have a clever idea for that utilizing CSS you could explore.

Rob Dodson said: “modals are actually the boss battle at the end of web accessibility.” Kinda nice that the native browser version helps with a lot of that. You even automatically get the Escape key closing functionality, which is great. There’s no click outside to close, though. Perhaps someday pending user feedback.

Ire’s article is a go-to resource for building your own dialogs and a ton of accessibility considerations when using them.

The post Some Hands-On with the HTML Dialog Element appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , , ,

Some Notes About Accessibility

Earlier this month Eric Bailey wrote about the current state of accessibility on the web and why it felt like fighting an uphill battle:

As someone with a good deal of interest in the digital accessibility space, I follow WebAIM’s work closely. Their survey results are priceless insights into how disabled people actually use the web, so when the organization speaks with authority on a subject, I listen.

WebAIM’s accessibility analysis of the top 1,000,000 homepages was released to the public on February 27, 2019. I’ve had a few days to process it, and frankly, it’s left me feeling pretty depressed. In a sea of already demoralizing findings, probably the most notable one is that pages containing ARIA—a specialized language intended to aid accessibility—are actually more likely to have accessibility issues.

Following up from that post, Ethan Marcotte jotted down his thoughts on the matter and about who has the responsibility to fix these issues in the long run:

Organizations like WebAIM have, alongside countless other non-profits and accessibility advocates, been showing us how we could make the web live up to its promise as a truly universal medium, one that could be accessed by anyone, anywhere, regardless of ability or need. And we failed.

I say we quite deliberately. This is on us: on you, and on me. And, look, I realize it may sting to read that. Hell, my work is constantly done under deadline, the way I work seems to change every year month, and it can feel hard to find the time to learn more about accessibility. And maybe you feel the same way. But the fact remains that we’ve created a web that’s actively excluding people, and at a vast, terrible scale. We need to meditate on that.

I suppose the lesson I’m taking from this is, well, we need to much, much more than meditating. I agree with Marcy Sutton: accessibility is a civil right, full stop. Improving the state of accessibility on the web is work we have to support. The alternative isn’t an option. Leaving the web in its current state isn’t fair. It isn’t just.

I entirely agree with Ethan here – we all have a responsibility to make the web a better place for everyone and especially when it comes to accessibility where the bar is so very low for us now. This isn’t to say that I know best, because there’s been plenty of times when I’ve dropped the ball when I’m designing something for the web.

What can we do to tackle the widespread issue surrounding web accessibility?

Well, as Eric mentions in his post, it’s first and foremost a problem of education and he points to Firefox and their great accessibility inspector as a tool to help us see and understand accessibility principles in action:

An image of the Firefox Accessibility tool inspecting the CSS-Tricks website

Marco Zehe is on the Firefox accessibility team wrote and about what the inspector is and how to use it:

This inspector is not meant as an evaluation tool. It is an inspection tool. So it will not give you hints about low contrast ratios, or other things that would tell you whether your site is WCAG compliant. It helps you inspect your code, helps you understand how your web site is translated into objects for assistive technologies.

Chris also wrote up some of his thoughts a short while ago, including other accessibility testing tools and checklists that can help us get started making more accessible experiences. The important thing to note here is that these tools need to be embedded within our process for web design if they’re going to solve these issues.

We can’t simply blame our tools.

I know the current state of web accessbility is pretty bad and that there’s an enormous amount of work to do for us all, but to be honest, I can’t help but feel a little optimistic. For the first time in my career, I’ve had designers and engineers alike approach me excitedly about accessibility. Each year, there are tons of workshops, articles, meetups, and talks (and I particularly like this talk by Laura Carvajal) on the matter meaning there’s a growing source of referential content that can teach us to be better.

And I can’t help but think that all of these conversations are a good sign – but now it’s up to us to do the work.

The post Some Notes About Accessibility appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , ,
[Top]