Tag: screen

Thinking in Behaviors, Not Screen Sizes

Chase McCoy wrote a nifty post about the “gap problem” when making a grid of items. His argument might be summarized like this: how should we space elements with margins in CSS? He notes that the gap property isn’t quite ready for prime time when it comes to using it with flexbox, like this:

.grid {   display: flex;   gap: 10px; }

Right now, using gap with flexbox is only supported in Firefox and I’ve already caught myself forgetting about that in a few projects. So watch out for that.

Anyway, the part about Chase’s blog post that I love is where he mentions Andy Bell’s technique for creating a responsive layout with no media queries, like this:

.grid {   display: grid;   grid-gap: 10px;   grid-template-columns: repeat(auto-fill, minmax(150px, 1fr)); }

This CSS is doing the following:

  • Make a grid with a 10px gap between each column and row.
  • Each column should have a minimum width (150px).
  • Each column should also be equal width (1fr).
  • The grid should auto-fill as many columns that can fit.

The nifty thing about all this is that our grid is now effectively responsive because of minmax — if you resize the browser, then the grid will snap down into fewer columns, just like this:

No media queries at all! Although sure, there’s a few other ways that you could get this to work but I think this is neat not just because we’re avoiding media queries — instead, it’s because it teaches us to think in a new way when designing and building components.

Chase continues:

With this technique, instead of using breakpoints to specify the screen size where your items should stack, you specify the minimum size an element should be before it stacks. I like this because it encourages developers to think about responsive design in terms of behaviors instead of screen sizes.

“Behaviors instead of screen sizes” is such a great way to think about component design! A lot of the problems I’ve encountered when making components for a design system is when I’ve been thinking about screen sizes — mobile, tablet, desktop, etc. — and trying to make those components fit within those constraints.

Thinking in behaviors is always more effective because there are so many things that can impact a component beyond what screen or device width we’re working with. Perhaps we want that component to fit inside another component. Or we want to align some helper text to the side of it for comparison.

Either way, thinking about behaviors instead of screen sizes isn’t really going to be fully impossible until we have container queries, as Chris writes:

Container queries are always on the top of the list of requested improvements to CSS. The general sentiment is that if we had container queries, we wouldn’t write as many global media queries based on page size. That’s because we’re actually trying to control a more scoped container, and the only reason we use media queries for that now is because it’s the best tool we have in CSS. I absolutely believe that.

The post Thinking in Behaviors, Not Screen Sizes appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , ,

The difference between keyboard and screen reader navigation

There are a few differences between keyboards and screen readers and Léonie Watson highlights of them:

When using the tab key, keyboard focus and screen reader focus are synchronised with each other. The rest of the time, screen reader users have an enormous range of commands at their disposal for reading and navigating content independently of keyboard focus. The commands vary between screen readers, but they all have one thing in common: they’re tied to different HTML elements.

This is also a good reminder that screen readers behave differently from one another. It’s worth doing some research to see how our sites work in all these environments. One thing is clear from this post though: writing semantic and concise HTML is the best way to improve accessibility for both users with keyboards and screen readers. For example, Scott O’Hara has this recent post on best practices using the tabindex attribute to ensure accessible navigation using the keyboard.

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

The post The difference between keyboard and screen reader navigation appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , , , ,
[Top]