Tag: Saved

Some Articles About Accessibility I’ve Saved Recently

  • “Good news about display: contents and Chrome” — Rachel Andrew notes that the accessibility danger of using display: contents; is fixed in Chrome. The problem was that, say you had a parent div that is laid out as a grid and inside you have a <ul> with <li> elements, and you wanted the <li> elements to participate on that same parent grid. We have subgrid, but it’s not really the same thing. What you want is just to pretend like the <ul> isn’t there at all and that the <li> elements can hang out on the grid like anything else. The problem was that if you did that, you wiped out the accessible semantics of the list. But no more!
  • “Grid, content re-ordering, and accessibility”  — Speaking of grids and accessibility, here’s Rachel again teaching us (through this slide deck) how it’s all-too-easy to really diverge the source order and display order of content with modern layout techniques. At the moment, the solution is essentially not to do that, but the future might hold a way for browsers to update tab order to be visually sensible when you do dramatically alter the layout.
  • “The most useful accessibility testing tools and techniques” — Atrem Sapegin lists out some good ones, like eslint-plugin-jsx-a11y, storybook-addon-a11y, cypress-axe, Contrast app, Spectrum browser extension, and… using your tab key (lolz).
  • ButtonBuddy — Tool from Stephanie Eckles that helps generate CSS for buttons. But the real point of it is to give you colors as custom properties that satisfy color contrast guidelines.
  • “Are your Anchor Links Accessible?” — Amber Wilson goes through five iterations of an anchor link in/by a header before landing on a good one and, even then, there are questions to tackle.
  • “Don’t put pointer-events: none on form labels” — I’m a little shocked that anyone would do this at all, but it turns out it comes from Material Design’s “floating label” pattern. I think that pattern is so silly. It doesn’t actually save any space because you need the space where you float the label to anyway. Gosh.
  • “Accessible Text Labels For All” — Sara Soueidan tests real accessibility software and how it presents common interactive elements. For example, a “read more” link isn’t very useful (read more what?), and “add to cart” isn’t very useful alone (add what to cart?). You can add, for example, product names to those “add to cart” buttons, but don’t do it in the middle of the button as that can break things. Add the extra text at the end.

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WooCommerce Payments, Now with Support for Subscriptions and Saved Cards

A little while back we shared the news that WooCommerce shipped a beta payments feature as part of its 4.0 release. It’s a free plugin with no monthly costs or setup fees. You only pay when you make a sale.

We’re actually using this right here at CSS-Tricks. In fact, Chris blogged it back in July. Back then, we were using the WooCommerce Payments beta so we could start selling memberships here on the site and do it while taking payments without anyone having to leave the site to complete the transaction with a third-party.

The big news now is that WooCommerce Payments now supports WooCommerce Subscriptions. This is game-changer. It means you can offer a recurring payment option on subscription-based products and have all of those payments integrated with WooCommerce Payments reporting and features.

WooCommerce Payments works alongside other payment methods! We’ve enabled PayPal for anyone who prefers paying that way.

Enter subscriptions

The thing that makes WooCommerce Subscriptions such a great extension is that it turns any WooCommerce product into a possible subscription. So, yes, even a t-shirt can generate recurring payments (a shirt is not a good example of a subscription product, but the point is that subscriptions can be tied to anything). Anything you want to renew after a period of time is fair game. That could be a publication subscription that renews annually, a record of the month club with a monthly subscription, or even a payment plan that allows customers to pay for large purchases in monthly installments.

No no, the poster is not a subscription… but you can buy it with a one-time payment!

Now that WooCommerce Payments supports WooCommerce Subscriptions, not only are recurring payments a thing, but it brings all of those transactions to your store’s dashboard, making it a cinch to track those payments, as well as your cash flow. Payment disputes can even be handled without ever having to leave WordPress.

Oh, and saved credit cards!

In addition to subscriptions, WooCommerce Payments also supports saved credit cards. So now, when someone purchases anything on your site — whether it’s a single product or a recurring subscription — they can choose to save their payment information with you for faster transactions on future purchases!

Heck yeah, checking out next time will be a breeze!

All the things, all on WordPress

WooCommerce has been great for a long time, but it’s these sorts of enhancements that make it not just a killer experience but makes powerful e-commerce capabilities open to big and small stores alike. Get started with WooCommerce and WooCommerce Payments — it’s totally free to pick up and try out.


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