Tag: Regarding

Regarding CSS’s Global Scope

html {   font-family: Roboto, sans-serif; }

With the except of some form elements, you’ve just set a font on every bit of text on a site! Nice! That’s probably what you were trying to do, because of the probably hundreds of elements all over your site, setting that font-family every time would be tedious and error-prone.

CSS is global by nature. On purpose!

I like how David Khourshid put it:

You ever stop and think about why CSS has a global scope? Maybe we want to use consistent typography, colors, sizing, spacing, layout, transitions, etc. and have our websites & apps feel like one cohesive unit?

Love the cascade, the cascade is your friend.

And yet. The global nature of CSS is perhaps the most-pointed-at anti-feature of CSS. Some people really don’t like it. We all know it’s very easy to write a single CSS rule that has implications all over a site, breaking things you really didn’t want to break.

There are whole new categories of testing to assist with these problems.

Scoped styles aren’t the only reason there is such interest and adoption in the landscape of tools that is CSS-in-JS, but it’s a big one. There are loads of sites that don’t directly author any CSS at all — even preprocessed styles — and go for a JavaScript library instead where styles are authored quite literally in JavaScript. There is a playground demonstrating the syntax of the various options. Here’s how styled-components works:

import React from 'react'; import styled from 'styled-components';  const Container = styled.main`   display: flex;   flex-direction: column;   min-height: 100%;   width: 100%;   background-color: #f6f9fc; `;  export default function Login() {   return (     <Container>       ... Some stuff ....     </Container>   ); }

There are literally dozens of options, each doing things a bit differently while offering slightly different syntaxes and features. Vue even offers scoped CSS directly in .vue files:

<style scoped> .example {   color: red; } </style>  <template>   <div class="example">hi</div> </template>

Unfortunately, <style scoped> never quite made it as a native web platform feature. There is shadow DOM, though, where a style block can be injected in a template and those styles will be isolated from the rest of the page:

let myElement = document.querySelector('.my-element');  let shadow = myElement.attachShadow({   mode: 'closed' }); shadow.innerHTML = `   <style>     p {        color: red;     }   </style>    <p>Element with Shadow DOM</p> `;

No styles will leak into or out of that shadow DOM boundary. That’s pretty cool for people seeking this kind of isolation, but it could be tricky. You’d likely have to architect the CSS to have certain global styles that can be imported with the shadow DOM’d web component so it can achieve some styling cohesion in your site. Personally, I wish it was possible to make the shadow DOM one-way permeable: styles can leak in, but styles defined inside can’t leak out.

CSS-in-JS stuff is only one way to scope styles. There are actually two sides to the spectrum. You could call CSS-in-JS total isolation, whereas you could author CSS directly with total abstraction:

Total abstraction might come from a project, like Tachyons, that gives you a fixed set of class names to use for styling (Tailwind is like a configurable version of that), or a programmatic tool (like Atomizer) that turns specially named HTML class attributes into a stylesheet with exactly what it needs.

Even adhering 100% to BEM across your entire site could be considered total CSS isolation, solving the problems that the global scope may bring.

Personally, I’d like to see us move to this kind of future:

When we write styles, we will always make a choice. Is this a global style? Am I, on purpose, leaking this style across the entire site? Or, am I writing CSS that is specific to this component? CSS will be split in half between these two. Component-specific styles will be scoped and bundled with the component and used as needed.

Best of both worlds, that.

Anyway, it’s tricky.

Maybe this will be the hottest CSS topic in 2019.

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Browser Diversity Commentary, Regarding the Edge News

Still no word from the horse’s mouth about the reported EdgeHTML demise, but I hear that’s coming later today. The blog posts are starting to roll in about the possible impact of this though.

Andre Garzia: While we Blink, we loose the Web:

Even though Opera, Beaker and Brave are all doing very good work, it is still Chrome engine behind them and that limits the amount of stuff they can build and innovate. It is like as if they were building cars, there is a lot they can do without actually changing the engine itself, and thats what the Web Browsers are becoming, everyone is working on parts of the car but all the engines are now Chrome and believe me, you don’t want all the engines to be the same, not even if they are all Gecko or if somehow we resurrect Presto, we want diversity of engines and not monoculture.

Tim Kadlec, Risking a Homogeneous Web:

I can understand the logic. Microsoft can’t put as many folks on Edge (including EdgeHTML for rendering and Chakra for JavaScript) as Google has done with Chromium (using Blink for rendering and V8 for JavaScript), so keeping up was always going to be a challenge. Now they can contribute to the same codebase and try to focus on the user-focused features. Whether this gets people to pay more attention to their next browser or not remains to be seen, but I get the thinking behind the move.

The big concern here is we’ve lost another voice from an engine perspective.

Ferdy Christant, The State of Web Browsers:

Edge is doomed. It was doomed and its next version will be equally doomed from the start. For the simple reason that Microsoft has close to no say in how browsers get installed: on mobile as a default app, and on desktop via web services under the control of Google. Switching to Chromium makes no difference in market share, as the only way to compete now is through the browser’s UI, not via the engine. Which isn’t a competition at all, since browser UI is a commodity.

I’ll link up the official statements as they come out.

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