Tag: Properties

Image Fragmentation Effect With CSS Masks and Custom Properties

Geoff shared this idea of a checkerboard where the tiles disappear one-by-one to reveal an image. In it, an element has a background image, then a CSS Grid layout holds the “tiles” that go from a filled background color to transparent, revealing the image. A light touch of SCSS staggers the animation.

I have a similar idea, but with a different approach. Instead of revealing the image, let’s start with it fully revealed, then let it disappear one tile at a time, as if it’s floating away in tiny fragments.

Here’s a working demo of the result. No JavaScript handling, no SVG trickery. Only a single <img> and some SCSS magic.

Cool, right? Sure, but here’s the rub. You’re going to have to view this in Chrome, Edge or Opera because those are the only browsers with support for @property at the moment and that’s a key component to this idea. We won’t let that stop us because this is a great opportunity to get our hands wet with cool CSS features, like masks and animating linear gradients with the help of @property.

Masking things

Masking is sometimes hard to conceptualize and often gets confused with clipping. The bottom line: masks are images. When an image is applied as mask to an element, any transparent parts of the image allow us see right through the element. Any opaque parts will make the element fully visible.

Masks work the same way as opacity, but on different portions of the same element. That’s different from clipping, which is a path where everything outside the path is simply hidden. The advantages of masking is that we can have as many mask layers as we want on the same element — similar to how we can chain multiple images on background-image.

And since masks are images, we get to use CSS gradients to make them. Let’s take an easy example to better understand the trick.

img {   mask:     linear-gradient(rgba(0,0,0,0.8) 0 0) left,  /* 1 */     linear-gradient(rgba(0,0,0,0.5) 0 0) right; /* 2 */   mask-size: 50% 100%;   mask-repeat: no-repeat; }

Here, we’re defining two mask layers on an image. They are both a solid color but the alpha transparency values are different. The above syntax may look strange but it’s a simplified way of writing linear-gradient(rgba(0,0,0,0.8), rgba(0,0,0,0.8)).

It’s worth noting that the color we use is irrelevant since the default mask-mode is alpha. The alpha value is the only relevant thing. Our gradient can be linear-gradient(rgba(X,Y,Z,0.8) 0 0) where X, Y and Z are random values.

Each mask layer is equal to 50% 100% (or half width and full height of the image). One mask covers the left and the other covers the right. At the end, we have two non-overlapping masks covering the whole area of the image and, as we discussed earlier, each one has a differently defined alpha transparency value.

We’re looking at two mask layers created with two linear gradients. The first gradient, left, has an alpha value of 0.8. The second gradient, right, has an alpha value of 0.5. The first gradient is more opaque meaning more of the image shows through. The second gradient is more transparent meaning more of the of background shows through.

Animating linear gradients

What we want to do is apply an animation to the linear gradient alpha values of our mask to create a transparency animation. Later on, we’ll make these into asynchronous animations that will create the fragmentation effect.

Animating gradients is something we’ve been unable to do in CSS. That is, until we got limited support for @property. Jhey Tompkins did a deep dive into the awesome animating powers of @property, demonstrating how it can be used to transition gradients. Again, you’ll want to view this in Chrome or another Blink-powered browser:

In short, @property lets us create custom CSS properties where we’re able to define the syntax by specifying a type. Let’s create two properties, --c-0 and--c-1 , that take a number with an initial value of 1.

@property --c-0 {    syntax: "<number>";    initial-value: 1;    inherits: false; } @property --c-1 {    syntax: "<number>";    initial-value: 1;    inherits: false; }

Those properties are going to represent the alpha values in our CSS mask. And since they both default to fully opaque (i.e. 1 ), the entire image shows through the mask. Here’s how we can rewrite the mask using the custom properties:

/* Omitting the @property blocks above for brevity */  img {   mask:     linear-gradient(rgba(0,0,0,var(--c-0)) 0 0) left,  /* 1 */     linear-gradient(rgba(0,0,0,var(--c-1)) 0 0) right; /* 2 */   mask-size: 50% 100%;   mask-repeat: no-repeat;   transition: --c-0 0.5s, --c-1 0.3s 0.4s; }  img:hover {   --c-0:0;   --c-1:0; }

All we’re doing here is applying a different transition duration and delay for each custom variable. Go ahead and hover the image. The first gradient of the mask will fade out to an alpha value of 0 to make the image totally see through, followed but the second gradient.

More masking!

So far, we’ve only been working with two linear gradients on our mask and two custom properties. To create a tiling or fragmentation effect, we’ll need lots more tiles, and that means lots more gradients and a lot of custom properties!

SCSS makes this a fairly trivial task, so that’s what we’re turning to for writing styles from here on out. As we saw in the first example, we have a kind of matrix of tiles. We can think of those as rows and columns, so let’s define two SCSS variables, $ x and $ y to represent them.

Custom properties

We’re going to need @property definitions for each one. No one wants to write all those out by hand, though, so let’s allow SCSS do the heavy lifting for us by running our properties through a loop:

@for $ i from 0 through ($ x - 1) {   @for $ j from 0 through ($ y - 1) {     @property --c-#{$ i}-#{$ j} {       syntax: "<number>";       initial-value: 1;       inherits: false;     }   } }

Then we make all of them go to 0 on hover:

img:hover {   @for $ i from 0 through ($ x - 1) {     @for $ j from 0 through ($ y - 1) {       --c-#{$ i}-#{$ j}: 0;     }   } }

Gradients

We’re going to write a @mixin that generates them for us:

@mixin image() {   $ all_t: (); // Transition   $ all_m: (); // Mask   @for $ i from 0 through ($ x - 1) {     @for $ j from 0 through ($ y - 1) {       $ all_t: append($ all_t, --c-#{$ i}-#{$ j} transition($ i,$ j), comma);       $ all_m: append($ all_m, linear-gradient(rgba(0,0,0,var(--c-#{$ i}-#{$ j})) 0 0) calc(#{$ i}*100%/(#{$ x} - 1)) calc(#{$ j}*100%/(#{$ y} - 1)), comma);     }   }   transition: $ all_t;   mask: $ all_m; }

All our mask layers equally-sized, so we only need one property for this, relying on the $ x and $ y variables and calc():

mask-size: calc(100%/#{$ x}) calc(100%/#{$ y})

You may have noticed this line as well:

$ all_t: append($ all_t, --c-#{$ i}-#{$ j} transition($ i,$ j), comma);

Within the same mixing, we’re also generating the transition property that contains all the previously defined custom properties.

Finally, we generate a different duration/delay for each property, thanks to the random() function in SCSS.

@function transition($ i,$ j) {   @return $ s*random()+s $ s*random()+s; }

Now all we have to do is to adjust the $ x and $ y variables to control the granularity of our fragmentation.

Playing with the animations

We can also change the random configuration to consider different kind of animations.

In the code above, I defined the transition() function like below:

// Uncomment one to use it @function transition($ i,$ j) {   // @return (($ s*($ i+$ j))/($ x+$ y))+s (($ s*($ i+$ j))/($ x+$ y))+s; /* diagonal */   // @return (($ s*$ i)/$ x)+s (($ s*$ j)/$ y)+s; /* left to right */   // @return (($ s*$ j)/$ y)+s (($ s*$ i)/$ x)+s; /* top to bottom */   // @return  ($ s*random())+s (($ s*$ j)/$ y)+s; /* top to bottom random */   @return  ($ s*random())+s (($ s*$ i)/$ y)+s; /* left to right random */   // @return  ($ s*random())+s (($ s*($ i+$ j))/($ x+$ y))+s; /* diagonal random */   // @return ($ s*random())+s ($ s*random())+s; /* full random*/ }

By adjusting the formula, we can get different kinds of animation. Simply uncomment the one you want to use. This list is non-exhaustive — we can have any combination by considering more forumlas. (I’ll let you imagine what’s possible if we add advanced math functions, like sin(), sqrt(), etc.)

Playing with the gradients

We can still play around with our code by adjusting the gradient so that, instead of animating the alpha value, we animate the color stops. Our gradient will look like this:

linear-gradient(white var(--c-#{$ i}-#{$ j}),transparent 0)

Then we animate the variable from 100% to 0%. And, hey, we don’t have to stick with linear gradients. Why not radial?

Like the transition, we can define any kind of gradient we want — the combinations are infinite!

Playing with the overlap

Let’s introduce another variable to control the overlap between our gradient masks. This variable will set the mask-size like this:

calc(#{$ o}*100%/#{$ x}) calc(#{$ o}*100%/#{$ y})

There is no overlap if it’s equal to 1. If it’s bigger, then we do get an overlap. This allows us to make even more kinds of animations:

That’s it!

All we have to do is to find the perfect combination between variables and formulas to create astonishing and crazy image fragmentation effects.


The post Image Fragmentation Effect With CSS Masks and Custom Properties appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , , , ,

How to Play and Pause CSS Animations with CSS Custom Properties

Let’s have a look CSS @keyframes animations, and specifically about how you can pause and otherwise control them. There is a CSS property specifically for it, that can be controlled with JavaScript, but there is plenty of nuance to get into in the details. We’ll also look at my preferred way of setting this up which gives lots of control. Hint: it involves CSS custom properties.

The importance of pausing animations

Recently, while working on the CSS-powered slideshow you’ll see later in this article, I was inspecting the animations in the Layers panel of DevTools. I noticed something interesting I’d never thought about before: animations not currently in the viewport were still running!

Maybe it’s not that unexpected. We know videos do that. Videos just go on until you pause them. But it made me wonder if these playing animations still use the CPU/GPU? Do they consume unnecessary processing power, slowing down other parts of the page?

Inspecting frames in the Performance panel in DevTools didn’t shed any more light on this since I couldn’t see “offscreen”-frames. But, when I scrolled away from my “CSS Only Slideshow” at the first slide, then waited and scrolled back, it was at slide five. The animation hadn’t paused. Animations just run and run, until you pause them.

So I began to look into how, why and when animations should pause. Performance is an obvious reason, given the findings above. Another reason is control. Users not only love to have control, but they should have control. A couple of years ago, my wife had a really bad concussion. Since then, she has avoided webpages with too many animations, as they make her dizzy. As a result, I consider accessibility perhaps the most important reason for allowing animations to pause.

All together, this is important stuff. We’re talking specifically about CSS keyframe animations, but broadly, that means we’re talking about:

  1. Performance
  2. Control
  3. Accessibility

The basics of pausing an animation

The only way to truly pause an animation in CSS is to use the animation-play-state property with a paused value.

.paused {   animation-play-state: paused; }

In JavaScript, the property is “camelCased” as animationPlayState and set like this:

element.style.animationPlayState = 'paused';

We can create a toggle that plays and pauses the animation by reading the current value of animationPlayState:

const running = element.style.animationPlayState === 'running';

…and then setting it to the opposite value:

element.style.animationPlayState = running ? 'paused' : 'running';

Setting the duration

Another way to pause animations is to set animation-duration to 0s. The animation is actually running, but since it has no duration, you won’t see any action.

But if we change the value to 3s instead:

It works, but has a major caveat: the animations are technically still running. The animation is merely toggling between its initial position, and where it is next in the sequence.

Straight up removing the animation

We can remove the animation entirely and add it back via classes, but like animation-duration, this doesn’t actually pause the animation.

.remove-animation {   animation: none !important; }

Since true pausing is really what we’re after here, let’s stick with animation-play-state and look into other ways of using it.

Using data attributes and CSS custom properties

Let’s use a data-attribute as a selector in our CSS. We can call those whatever we want, so I’m going to use a [data-animation]-attribute on all the elements where I’d like to play/pause animations. That way, it can be distinguished from other animations:

<div data-animation></div>

That attribute is the selector, and the animation shorthand is the property where we’re setting everything. We’ll toss in a bunch of CSS custom properties *(*using Emmet-abbreviations) as values:

[data-animation] {   animation:     var(--animn, none)     var(--animdur, 1s)     var(--animtf, linear)     var(--animdel, 0s)     var(--animic, infinite)     var(--animdir, alternate)     var(--animfm, none)     var(--animps, running); }

With that in place, any animation with this data-attribute will be perfectly ready to accept animations, and we can control individual aspects of the animation with custom properties. Some animations are going to have something in common (like duration, easing-type, etc.), so fallback values are set on the custom properties as well.

Why CSS custom properties? First of all, they can be read and set in both CSS and JavaScript. Secondly, they help significantly reduce the amount of CSS we need to write. And, since we can set them within @keyframes (at least in Chrome at the time of writing), they offer new and exiting ways to work with animations!

For the animations themselves, I’m using class selectors and updating the variables from the [data-animation]-selector:

<div class="circle a-slide" data-animation></div>

Why a class and a data-attribute? At this stage, the data-animation attribute might as well be a regular class, but we’re going to use it in more advanced ways later. Note that the .circle class name actually has nothing to do with the animation — it’s just a class for styling the element.

/* Animation classes */ .a-pulse {   --animn: pulse; } .a-slide {   --animdur: 3s;   --animn: slide; }  /* Keyframes */ @keyframes pulse {   0% { transform: scale(1); }   25% { transform: scale(.9); }   50% { transform: scale(1); }   75% { transform: scale(1.1); }   100% { transform: scale(1); } } @keyframes slide {   from { margin-left: 0%; }   to { margin-left: 150px; } }

We only need to update the values that will change, so if we use some common values in the fallback values for the data-animation selector, we only need to update the name of the animation’s custom property, --animn.

Example: Pausing with the checkbox hack

To pause all the animations using the ol’ checkbox hack, let’s create a checkbox before the animations:

<input type="checkbox" data-animation-pause />

And update the --animps property when checked:

[data-animation-pause]:checked ~ [data-animation] {   --animps: paused; }

That’s it! The animations toggle between played and paused when clicking the checkbox — no JavaScript required.

CSS-only slideshow

Let’s put some of these ideas to work!

I‘ve played with the <details>-tag a lot recently. It’s the obvious candidate for accordions, but it can also be used for tooltips, toggle-tips, drop-downs (styled <select>-look-a-likes), mega-menus… you name it. It is the official HTML disclosure element, after all. Apart from the global attributes and global events that all HTML elements accept, <details> has a single open attribute, and a single toggle event. So, like the checkbox hack, it’s perfect for toggling state — but even simpler:

details[open] {   --state: 1; } details:not([open]) {   --state: 0; }

I decided to do a slideshow, where the slides change automatically via a primary animation called autoplay, and each individual slide has its own unique secondary animation. The animation-play-state is controlled by the --animps-property. Each individual slide can have it’s own, unique animation, defined in a --animn-property:

<figure style="--animn:kenburns-top;--index:0;">   <img src="some-slide-image.jpg" />   <figcaption>Caption</figcaption> </figure>

The animation-play-state of the secondary animations are controlled by the --img-animps-property. I found a bunch of nice Ken Burns-esque animations at Animista and switched between them in the --animn-properties of the slides.

Pausing an animation from another animation

In order to prevent GPU overload, it would be ideal for the primary animation to pause any secondary animations. We noted it briefly earlier, but only Chrome (at the time of writing, and it is a bit shaky) can update a CSS Custom Property from an @keyframe animation — which you can see in the following example where the --bgc-property and --counter-properties are modified at different frames:

The initial state of the secondary animation, the --img-animps -property, needs to be paused, even if the primary animation is running:

details[open] ~ .c-mm__inner .c-mm__frame {   --animps: running;   --img-animps: paused; }

Then, in the main animation @keyframes, the property is updated to running:

@keyframes autoplay {   0.1% {     --img-animps: running; /* START */     opacity: 0;     z-index: calc(var(--z) + var(--slides))   }   5% { opacity: 1 }   50% { opacity: 1 }   51% { --img-animps: paused } /* STOP! */   100% {     opacity: 0;     z-index: var(--z)   } }

To make this work in browsers other than Chrome, the initial value needs to be running, as they cannot update a CSS custom property from a @keyframe.

Here’s the slideshow, with a “details hack” play/pause-button — no JavaScript required:

Enabling prefers-reduced-motion

Some people prefer no animations, or at least reduced motion. It might just be a personal preference, but can also be because of a medical condition. We talked about the importance of accessibility with animations at the very top of this post.

Both macOS and Windows have options that allow users to inform browsers that they prefer reduced motion on websites. This enables us to reach for the prefers-reduced-motion feature query, which Eric Bailey has written all about.

@media (prefers-reduced-motion) { ... }

Let’s use the [data-animation]-selector for reduced motion by giving it different values that are applied when prefers-reduced-motion is enabled*:*

  • alternate = run a different animation
  • once = set the animation-iteration-count to 1
  • slow = change the animation-duration-property
  • stop = set animation-play-state to paused

These are just suggestions and they can be anything you want, really.

<div class="circle a-slide" data-animation="alternate"></div> <div class="circle a-slide" data-animation="once"></div> <div class="circle a-slide" data-animation="slow"></div> <div class="circle a-slide" data-animation="stop"></div>

And the updated media query:

@media (prefers-reduced-motion) {   [data-animation="alternate"] {    /* Change animation duration AND name */     --animdur: 4s;     --animn: opacity;   }   [data-animation="slow"] {     /* Change animation duration */     --animdur: 10s;   }   [data-animation="stop"] {     /* Stop the animation */     --animps: paused;   } }

If this is too generic, and you prefer having unique, alternate animations per animation class, group the selectors like this:

.a-slide[data-animation="alternate"] { /* etc. */ }

Here’s a Pen with a checkbox simulating prefers-reduced-motion. Scroll down within the Pen to see the behavior change for each circle:

Pausing with JavaScript

To re-create the “Pause all animations”-checkbox in JavaScript, iterate all the [data-animation]-elements and toggle the same --animps custom property:

<button id="js-toggle" type="button">Toggle Animations</button>
const animations = document.querySelectorAll('[data-animation'); const jstoggle = document.getElementById('js-toggle');  jstoggle.addEventListener('click', () => {   animations.forEach(animation => {     const running = getComputedStyle(animation).getPropertyValue("--animps") || 'running';     animation.style.setProperty('--animps', running === 'running' ? 'paused' : 'running');   }) });

It’s exactly the same concept as the checkbox hack, using the same custom property: --animps, only set by JavaScript instead of CSS. If we want to support older browsers, we can toggle a class, that will update the animation-play-state.

Using IntersectionObserver

To play and pause all [data-animation]-animations automatically — and thus not unnecessarily overloading the GPU — we can use an IntersectionObserver.

First, we need to make sure that no animations are running at all:

[data-animation] {   /* Change 'running' to 'paused' */   animation: var(--animps, paused);  }

Then, we’ll create the observer and trigger it when an element is 25% or 75% in viewport. If the latter is matched, the animation starts playing; otherwise it pauses.

By default, all elements with a [data-animation]-attribute will be observed, but if prefers-reduced-motion is enabled (set to “reduce”), the elements with [data-animation="stop"] will be ignored.

const IO = new IntersectionObserver((entries) => {   entries.forEach((entry) => {     if (entry.isIntersecting) {       const state = (entry.intersectionRatio >= 0.75) ? 'running' : 'paused';       entry.target.style.setProperty('--animps', state);     }   }); }, {   threshold: [0.25, 0.75] });  const mediaQuery = window.matchMedia("(prefers-reduced-motion: reduce)"); const elements = mediaQuery?.matches ? document.querySelectorAll(`[data-animation]:not([data-animation="stop"]`) : document.querySelectorAll('[data-animation]');  elements.forEach(animation => {   IO.observe(animation); });

You have to play around with the threshold-values, and/or whether you need to unobserve some animations after they’ve triggered, etc. If you load new content or animations dynamically, you might need to re-write parts of the observer as well. It’s impossible to cover all scenarios, but using this as a foundation should get you started with auto-playing and pausing CSS animations!

Bonus: Adding <audio> to the slideshow with minimal JavaScript

Here’s an idea to add music to the slideshow we built. First, add an audio-tag:

<audio src="/asset/audio/slideshow.mp3" hidden loop></audio>

Then, in Javascript:

const audio = document.querySelector('your-audio-selector'); const details = document.querySelector('your-details-selector'); details.addEventListener('toggle', () => {   details.open ? audio.play() : audio.pause(); })

Pretty simple, huh?

I did a “Silent Movie” (with audio)-demo here, where you get to know my geeky past. 🙂


The post How to Play and Pause CSS Animations with CSS Custom Properties appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , , ,
[Top]

Custom Properties as State

Here’s a fun idea from James Stanley: a CSS file (that presumably updates daily) containing CSS custom properties for “seasonal” colors (e.g. spring is greens, fall is oranges). You’d then use the values to theme your site, knowing that those colors change slightly from day to day.

This is what I got while writing this:

:root {   --seasonal-bg: hsl(-68.70967741935485,9.419354838709678%,96%);   --seasonal-bgdark: hsl(-68.70967741935485,9.419354838709678%,90%);   --seasonal-fg: hsl(-68.70967741935485,9.419354838709678%,30%);   --seasonal-hl: hsl(-83.70967741935485,30.000000000000004%,50%);   --seasonal-hldark: hsl(-83.70967741935485,30.000000000000004%,35%); }

I think it would be more fun if the CSS file provided was just the custom properties and not the opinionated other styles (like what sets the body background and such). That way you could implement the colors any way you choose without any side effects.

This makes me think that a CDN-hosted CSS file like this could have other useful stuff, like today’s date for usage in pseudo content, or other special time-sensitive stuff. Maybe the phase of the moon? Sports scores?! Soup of the day?!

/* <div class="soup">The soup of the day is: </div> */ .soup::after {   content: var(--soupOfTheDay); /* lol kinda */ }

It’s almost like a data API that is tremendously easy to use. Pseudo content is even accessible content these days — but you can’t select the text of pseudo-elements, so don’t read this as an actual endorsement of using CSS as a content API.

Will Boyd just blogged about what is possible to put in a custom property. They are tremendously flexible. Just about anything is a valid custom property value and then the usage tends to behave just how you think it will.

body {   /* totally fine */   --rgba: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.1);   background: var(--rgba);    /* totally fine */   --rgba: 255, 0, 0, 0.1;   background: rgba(var(--rgba));    /* totally fine */   --rgb: 255 0 0;   --a: 0.1;   background: rgb(var(--rgb) / var(--a)); }  body::after {   /* totally fine */   --song: "I need quotes to be pseudo content \A and can't have line breaks without this weird hack \A but still fairly permissive (💧💧💧) ";   content: var(--song);   white-space: pre; }

Bram Van Damme latched onto that flexiblity while covering Will’s article:

That’s why you can use CSS Custom Properties to:

perform conditional calculations

pass data from within your CSS to your JavaScript

inject skin tone / hair color modifiers onto Emoji 

toggle multiple values with one custom property (--foo: ; hack)

Bram points out this “basic” state-flipping quality that a custom property can pull off:

:root {   --is-big: 0; }  .is-big {   --is-big: 1; }  .block {   padding: calc(     25px * var(--is-big) +     10px * (1 - var(--is-big))   );   border-width: calc(     3px * var(--is-big) +     1px * (1 - var(--is-big))   ); }

Add a couple of scoops of complexity and you get The Raven (media queries with custom properties).

Will calls them “CSS variables” which is super common and understandable. You’ll read (and I have written) sentences often that are like “CSS variables (a.k.a CSS Custom Properties)” or “CSS Custom Properties (a.k.a CSS Variables.” Šime Vidas recently noted there is a rather correct way to refer to these things: --this-part is the custom property and var(--this-part) is the variable, which comes right from usage in the spec.

And that reminds me of this Vue proposal. I’m not sure if it went anywhere, but the state of a component would automatically be exposed as CSS custom properties.

<template>   <div class="text">Hello</div> </template>  <script> export default {   data() {     return {       color: 'red'     }   } } </script>  <style vars="{ color }"> .text {   color: var(--color); } </style>

By virtue of having color as part of the state of this component, then --color is available as state to the CSS of this component. I think that’s a great idea.

What if every time you used useState in React, CSS custom properties were put on the :root and were updated automatically. For example, if you did this:

import React, { useState } from 'https://cdn.skypack.dev/react@^16.13.1'; import ReactDOM from 'https://cdn.skypack.dev/react-dom@^16.13.1';  const App = () => {   const [ activeColor, setActiveColor ] = useState("red");   return(     <div className="box">       <h1>Active Color: {activeColor}</h1>       <button onClick={() => {setActiveColor("red")}}>red</button>       <button onClick={() => {setActiveColor("blue")}}>blue</button>     </div>   ); }  ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById("root"))

And you knew you could do like:

.box {   border-color: 2px solid var(--activeColor); }

Because the state automatically mapped itself to a custom property. Someone should make a useStateWithCustomProperties hook or something to do that. #freeidea

Libraries like React and Vue are for building UI. I think it makes a lot of sense that the state that they manage is automatically exposed to CSS.

And speaking of state that CSS should know about, I’ve seen quite a few demos that do fun stuff by mapping over things, like the current mouse position or scroll position, over to CSS. I don’t think it’s entirely unreasonable to ask for that data to be natively exposed to CSS. We already have the concept of environment variables, like env(safe-area-inset-top), and I could see that being used to expose page state, like env(page-scroll-percentage) or env(mouseY).


The post Custom Properties as State appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, ,
[Top]

CSS Individual Transform Properties in Safari Technology Preview

The WebKit blog details how to use individual CSS Transform properties in the latest version of Safari Technology Preview. This brings the browser in line with the CSS Transforms Module Level 2 spec, which breaks out the translate(), rotate() and scale() functions from the transform property into their own individual properties: translate, scale, and rotate.

So, instead of chaining those three functions on the transform property:

.some-element {   transform: translate(50px 50px) rotate(15deg) scale(1.2); }

…we can write those out individually as their own properties:

.some-element {   translate(50px 50px);   rotate(15deg);   scale(1.2); }

If you’re like me, your mind immediately jumps to “why the heck would we want to write MORE lines of code?” I mean, we’re used to seeing individual properties become sub-properties of a shorthand, not the other way around, like we’ve seen with background, border, font, margin, padding, place-items, and so on.

But the WebKit team outlines some solid reasons why we’d want to do this:

  • It’s simpler to write a single property when only one function is needed, like scale: 2; instead of transform: scale(2);.
  • There’s a lot less worry about accidentally overriding other transform properties when they’re chained together.
  • It’s a heckuva lot simpler to change a keyframe animation on an individual property rather than having to “pre-compute” and “recompute” intermediate values when chaining them with transform.
  • We get more refined control over the timing and keyframes of individual properties.

The post points out some helpful tips as well. Like, the new individual transform properties are applied first — translate, rotate, and scale, in that order — before the functions in the transform property.

Oh, and we can’t overlook browser support! It’s extremely limited at the time of writing… basically to just Safari Technology Preview 117 and Firefox 72 and above for a whopping 3.9% global support:

The post suggests using @supports if you want to start using the properties:

@supports (translate: 0) {   /* Individual transform properties are supported */   div {     translate: 100px 100px;   } }  @supports not (translate: 0) {   /* Individual transform properties are NOT supported */   div {     transform: translate(100px, 100px);   } }

That’s the code example pulled straight from the post. Modifying this can help us avoid using the not operator. I’m not sure that’s an improvement to the code or not, but it feels more like progressive enhancement to do something like this:

div {   transform: translate(100px, 100px); }  @supports (translate: 0) {   /* Individual transform properties are supported */   div {     transform: none;     translate: 100px 100px;   } }

That way, we clear the shorthand functions and make way for the individual properties, but only if they’re supported.


The post CSS Individual Transform Properties in Safari Technology Preview appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , , , ,
[Top]

Using CSS Custom Properties to Adjust Variable Font Weights in Dark Mode

Black isn’t always slimming.

When recently testing a dark mode option for one of my sites, I experienced first-hand the issue that Robin Rendle addresses in this article. All of my page text — headings and body copy — appeared to bulk up when I switched to dark mode. And it didn’t matter what fonts I used or which browsers I tried. The same thing happened with all of them.

For example, here’s what happens with Adobe’s Source Sans Pro in Chrome for Windows:

See those blurry edges when we switch to dark mode?

It’s not an illusion. The light characters really are heavier against dark backgrounds. We can zoom in to see better:

The characters really are thicker in dark mode!

And it becomes really obvious when we invert the dark mode portions of those images:

We can really see the difference when putting the characters side-by-side on the same white background.
We can really see the difference when putting the characters side-by-side on the same white background.

One solution

Since variable fonts enjoy wide browser support, we can use them to help us address this issue. The three panels below demonstrate a solution we’ll be working toward:

The top shows us some light text on a dark background. The middle panel shows what happens in dark mode without changing any font weight settings. And the bottom panel demonstrates dark mode text that we’ve thinned out a bit. That third panel is adjusted to match the weight of its light counterpart, which is what we’re trying to accomplish here.

Here’s how we can get this improved effect:

  1. Reduce font-weight properties in dark mode via one of the following methods:
    1. Manually changing each font-weight assignment directly in a dark mode media query.
    2. Creating a single --font-weight-multiplier custom property that changes its value in dark mode, and by which we can then multiply by each element’s default font-weight value.
    3. Same thing, but instead of calculating each element’s font-weight property individually, we take advantage of CSS variable scoping and the universal selector (*) to apply our multiplier calculation everywhere at once.
  2. Adjust a variable font’s grade (“GRAD”) axis. Not all variable fonts support this specific feature, but Roboto Flex, does. Altering this axis value changes the font’s apparent weight, without affecting the width of the letters.
  3. Adjust a variable font’s darkmode ("DRKM") axis. Dalton Maag’s aptly-named Darkmode, with its eponymous darkmode axis, is uniquely suited for this. As with the Roboto Flex’s grade axis, adjusting Darkmode’s darkmode axis changes the font’s apparent weight. But while the grade axis requires some fine-tuning of values, the darkmode axis is simply switched on (thinner) or off (regular).

The techniques in the first group work for most variable fonts. The solution Robin uses in his article is actually the very first item in the group. I’ll expand on the second and third items in the group by introducing custom properties that help us automatically adjust font weights in dark mode.

The second and third groups involve less common font-variation-settings axes. Though these strategies apply to fewer typefaces, they may be preferable when available. The trick is knowing what a variable font supports before choosing it.

I’ve made a demonstration page including all the strategies covered in this article. You can see what some different variable fonts look like in light mode, in dark mode with no adjustment, and in dark mode with our solutions for thinning out characters.

In addition to the strategies listed above, there’s always one more option: don’t do anything! If you think your fonts look good enough in light and dark mode, or you don’t have the bandwidth right now to wrestle with reflow, element resizing, browser/display inconsistencies, and extra CSS to maintain, then you may not have to change a thing. Focus on the rest of your site and leave yourself open to the possibility of revisiting this topic later.

Strategy 1: Reducing the font-weight value

Most variable text fonts have a weight axis, which lets us assign any specific font-weight value within the weight range available to that font (e.g. 0-1000, 300-800, etc.). Each technique in this strategy takes advantage of this fine control over the weight axis to reduce font-weight values in dark mode. (The need for such font-weight precision is also what renders most non-variable fonts unsuitable for this solution.)

If you’re using variable fonts you have locally, you can check their axes and value ranges at Wakamai Fondue:

At Wakamai Fondue, you can view any local font’s variable axes and ranges.

Keep in mind that, if you’re using the @font-face rule to load fonts, you should set a font-weight range for each of them at the same time:

@font-face {   src: url('Highgate.woff2') format('woff2-variations');   font-family: 'Highgate';   font-weight: 100 900; }

If you neglect this step, some variable fonts may not properly reflect specific font-weight values in current Chromium browsers.

Dalton Maag Highgate’s font-weight set to 800 in Chrome without (left) and with (right) a font-weight range specified in the @font-face rule.

The basic solution: Manually entering each weight

Here’s the technique most of us may reach for. We create a dark mode media query in which we enter some font-weight values that are a bit lower than their defaults.

/* Default (light mode) CSS */  body {   font-weight: 400; }  strong, b, th, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 {   font-weight: 700; }  /* Dark mode CSS */ @media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) {   body {     font-weight: 350;   }    strong, b, th, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 {     font-weight: 600;   } }

It works, and it’s no problem to maintain — so long as we’re not planning on adding or editing any other weights at our site! But if we do start incorporating more weights, it can get unwieldy fast. Remember to enter each selector/property combo both outside and inside the prefers-color-scheme media query. We’ll have to do some manual calculations (or guesswork) to determine the dark mode property values for each element.

Creating a weight multiplier custom property and using it in a calculation when setting an element’s weight

I generally try to adhere to Mike Riethmuller’s credo that “media queries are only used to change the value of custom properties.” And that’s the improvement we make in this solution. Instead of having to enter font weights for all our elements in and out of dark mode, the only thing we’re putting in our media query is a --font-weight-multiplier custom property:

@media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) {   :root {     --font-weight-multiplier: .85;   } }

Then, for all our font-weight properties throughout the stylesheet, we’ll multiply the variable’s value by our preferred default weight value for each element — thus lowering the font weight by 15% in dark mode. If we’re not in dark mode, we’ll multiply the default weight by 1, meaning it doesn’t change at all.

Here’s what I mean. Normally, we’d use this to set a body font weight of 400:

body {   font-weight: 400; }

For this solution, we use this:

body {   font-weight: calc(400 * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1)); }

In the var() function, notice that our variable has a fallback value of 1. Because --font-weight-multiplier is only set in dark mode, this fallback value will be used the rest of the time. So, by default, our font weight for body text stays at 400 (400*1). But in dark mode, the weight decreases to 340 (400*.85).

We’ll also do this with bold elements:

strong, b, th, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 {   font-weight: calc(700 * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1)); }

These weights will decrease from 700 to 595 (700*.85) in dark mode.

And we can use the same technique for any other elements where we want to set the font-weight to something other than 400 by default.

I’m using a value of .85 for --font-weight-multiplier, because I’ve found that to be a good general value for most fonts (like Adobe Source Sans Pro, the free typeface I use in most of this article’s demos). But feel free to play around with that number.

Here’s how this looks put together:

/* DARK-MODE-SPECIFIC CUSTOM PROPERTIES */ @media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) {   :root {     --font-weight-multiplier: .85;   } }  /* DEFAULT CSS STYLES... */ body {   font-weight: calc(400 * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1)); }  strong, b, th, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 {   font-weight: calc(700 * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1)); }

Creating a weight multiplier variable and automatically calculating and applying it to all elements at once.

When using many CSS custom properties, I think many of us stick to a “set as needed and manually apply everywhere” approach. That’s what the previous solution does. We set our custom property value in the :root (and/or use a fallback value), set it again in a media query, then apply it with calc() and var() functions throughout our stylesheet each time we assign a font-weight value.

The code might look something like this:

h1 {   font-weight: calc(800 * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1); }  summary {   font-weight: calc(600 * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1); }

But when we use this technique for various elements, you can see we have to do these three things every time we assign font-weight values:

  • Include the calc() function
  • Include the var() function
  • Remember the --font-weight-multiplier custom property’s name and default value

Instead, I’ve recently started inverting this approach for certain tasks, taking advantage of CSS variable scope with a “set everywhere and apply once” method. For this technique, I replace every font-weight property in the stylesheet with a --font-weight variable, keeping the name the same except for the dashes, for simplicity’s sake. I then set this value to the default weight for that particular selector (e.g. 400 for body text). Neither calc() nor var() is needed — yet. This is how we set everywhere.

Then we apply once, with a lone font-weight property in our stylesheet that sets every text element’s weight via the universal selector. Modifying our snippet above, we’d now have this:

h1 {   --font-weight: 800; }  summary {   --font-weight: 600; }  * {   font-weight: calc(var(--font-weight, 400) * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1); }

The calc() function multiplies each of our --font-weight custom properties by our multiplier variable, and the font-weight property then applies the value to its appropriate element.

It’s unnecessary to use only a single var() for each custom property in the stylesheet. But I often like doing so when performing calculations and/or using a helper variable, as we do here. That said, while this is certainly the cleverest technique for adjusting font weights, that doesn’t mean it’s the best technique for all projects. There is at least one serious caveat.

The primary advantage of using the universal selector technique — that it applies to everything — also introduces its chief risk. There may be some elements that we don’t want thinned out! For example, if our form elements retain dark text on light backgrounds in dark mode, they may still get steamrolled by the universal selector.

There are ways to mitigate this risk. We could replace * with a long selector string containing a list of only elements to thin out (having them opt-in to the calculation). Or we could hard-code font weights for the elements that we don’t want affected (opt-out):

* {   font-weight: calc(var(--font-weight, 400) * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1)); }  button, input, select, textarea {   font-weight: 400; }

Such fixes may ultimately make code just as complicated as the previous technique. So, you’ll have to gauge which is appropriate for your project. If you still have concerns over performance, code complexity, or think this technique might introduce undesired (even unpredictable) results, the previous technique might be safest.

The final code:

/* DEFAULT CUSTOM PROPERTIES */ :root {   --font-weight: 400;   --font-weight-multiplier: 1; } strong, b, th, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 {   --font-weight: 700; }  /* DARK-MODE-SPECIFIC CUSTOM PROPERTIES */ @media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) {   :root {     --font-weight-multiplier: .85;   } }  /* APPLYING THE CUSTOM PROPERTIES... */ * {   font-weight: calc(var(--font-weight, 400) * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1)); }

We’re not required to set the default --font-weight: 400 and --font-weight-multiplier: 1 custom properties in the above code, because we’ve included the fallback values in the var() functions. But as code gets more complicated, I often like assigning them in a logical place, just in case I want to find and alter them later.

A final note on this strategy: we can also apply weights with the font-variation-settings property and a "wght" axis value, instead of font-weight. If you’re using a typeface with several axes, maybe you find it more manageable to do all your font tweaking that way. I know of at least one font (Type Network’s Roboto Flex, which we’ll be using later in this article) that has 13 axes!

Here’s how to apply our solution via a font-variation-settings property:

* {   --wght: calc(var(--font-weight, 400) * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1));   font-variation-settings: "wght" var(--wght); }

Strategy 1 Addendum: Handling letter-spacing

One side effect of lowering our type weight is that, for most non-monspaced fonts, it also narrows the characters.

Here again is what happens when we lighten Source Sans Pro with our multiplier. The top two panels below show Source Sans Pro in light and dark mode by default. And the lower panel shows the lighter version.

Adobe’s Source Sans Pro in light mode, dark mode by default, and dark mode thinned out.

With no adjustments, the characters in light mode and dark mode are the same width. But when we lower the font weight, those characters now take up less space. You may not like how this change affects your flow or element sizes (e.g. narrower buttons). And some designers think it’s a good idea to add letter spacing in dark mode, anyway. So, if you want, you can create another custom property to add some space.

Implementing a custom property for letter spacing

Just like we did with our font-weight multiplier variable, we’re going to create a letter spacing variable with a default value that gets overridden in dark mode. In our default (light mode) :root, we set our new --letter-spacing custom property to 0 for now:

:root {   /* ...other custom variables... */   --letter-spacing: 0; }

Then, in our dark mode query, we raise the value to something greater than 0. I’ve entered it as .02ch here (which combines pretty well with a --font-weight-multiplier value of .85). You could even get clever and fine-tune it with some calculations based on your font weights and/or sizes, if you like. But I’ll use this hard-coded value for now:

@media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) {   :root {     /* ...other custom variables... */     --letter-spacing: .02ch;   } }

Finally, we apply it via our universal selector (with a fallback value of 0):

* {   /* ...other property settings... */   letter-spacing: var(--letter-spacing, 0); }

Note: Though I use the ch unit in this example, using em also works, if you prefer. For Source Sans Pro, a value of .009em is about equal to .02ch.

Here’s the full code for a font weight multiplier with letter spacing:

/* DEFAULT CSS CUSTOM PROPERTIES */ :root {   --font-weight: 400;   --font-weight-multiplier: 1;   --letter-spacing: 0; }  strong, b, th, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 {   --font-weight: 700; }  /* DARK MODE CSS CUSTOM PROPERTIES */ @media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) {   :root {     /* Variables to set the dark mode bg and text colors for our demo. */     --background: #222;     --color: #fff;      /* Variables that affect font appearance in dark mode. */     --font-weight-multiplier: .85;     --letter-spacing: .02ch;   } }  /* APPLYING CSS STYLES... */ * {   font-weight: calc(var(--font-weight, 400) * var(--font-weight-multiplier, 1));   letter-spacing: var(--letter-spacing, 0); }  body {   background: var(--background, #fff);   color: var(--color, #222); } 

Fonts with constant-width characters (aka multi-plexed fonts)

In addition to monospaced fonts, there are some other typefaces specifically designed so that their individual characters take up the same amount of horizontal space, regardless of weight. For example, if an “i” occupies five horizontal pixels of space at a weight of 400, and a “w” occupies thirteen pixels at the same weight, they will still occupy five and thirteen pixels, respectively, when their weights are increased to 700.

Arrow Type’s Recursive Sans is one such typeface. The following image shows how Recursive’s characters maintain the same widths in light mode, default dark mode, and dark mode with our font weight multiplier, respectively:

The characters in Arrow Type’s Recursive maintain their widths regardless of font weight.

Multi-plexed typefaces, like Recursive, are designed so you won’t need to adjust letter spacing when changing their font weights in dark mode. Your element sizes and page flow will remain intact.

Strategy 2: Adjust a variable font’s grade axis

The grade axis ("GRAD") changes a font’s apparent weight without changing its actual font-weight value or the widths of its characters. When using fonts with this axis, you may not need our font weight multiplier variable at all.

For Type Network’s free Roboto Flex font, a grade of -1 is thinnest, 0 (default) is normal, and 1 is thickest. With this font, I start by assigning its grade axis a value of around -.75 for dark mode.

Roboto Flex in light mode, dark mode default, and dark mode with “GRAD” set to -.75
:root {   --GRAD: 0; }  @media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) {   :root {     --GRAD: -.75;   } }  body {   font-variation-settings: "GRAD" var(--GRAD, 0); }

So, adjusting the grade axis seems like the perfect solution if it’s available to you, right? Well, maybe. There are a few things to keep in mind when considering it.

First, the scale for all fonts doesn’t always go from -1 to 1. Some range from 0 to 1. At least one typeface uses percents, making 100 the default. And other fonts align the grade scale with font weights, so the range may be something like 100-900. If you want to use the grade axis in the latter case, you may have to set all your font weights everywhere to a default of 400, and then use the grade axis for all weight changes. For dark mode, you’ll then want to treat grade essentially like we do in our font weight multiplier solution — applying the multiplier to the "GRAD" axis in font-variation settings.

The second caveat is that some typefaces don’t let you grade a font to a value below its default weight. So, grade can’t lighten it at all. Apple’s San Francisco typeface (which can be tested via font-family: system-ui; on Apple devices) has both of these issues. As of macOS Catalina, San Francisco has a grade axis. It’s scaled to line up with font weights, and its minimum value is 400.

San Francisco’s grade and weight axes use the same scale, but have different ranges.

Because we can’t set the grade to a value lower than 400, we can’t lighten fonts from a default of 400 in dark mode. If we want to go lower, we’ll need to lower the weight axis value, instead.

Strategy 3: Adjusting a variable font’s darkmode axis

There’s currently only one typeface with a darkmode ("DRKM") axis at the time of this writing: Dalton Maag’s Darkmode.

The darkmode axis is essentially a grade axis without any fine-tuning. Just turn it on (1) for a thinner appearance in dark mode, and leave it off (0, the default) for normal display.

Darkmode in light mode, in dark mode with “DRKM” unset, and in dark mode with “DRKM” set to 1.
:root {   --DRKM: 0; }  @media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) {   :root {     --DRKM: 1;   } }  body {   font-variation-settings: "DRKM" var(--DRKM, 0); }

I like the Darkmode font a lot. But beware that it is a commercial license that’s required for professional use. Dalton Maag offers a trial version that can be used for “academic, speculative, or pitching purposes only.” I’m hoping this typeface is a pilot for more Dalton Maag families to get a darkmode axis, and that other font foundries will then follow suit!

Other factors to consider

We’ve covered a few big strategies for working with variable fonts in a dark mode context. But, as with most things, there are other things to consider that might sway you toward one solution or another.

Dark mode on high-resolution (“retina”) screens

On screens with higher pixel densities (e.g. most modern phones, MacBooks, iMacs, etc.), the thickening effect of dark mode is often less pronounced. Therefore, you may not want to thin the fonts on these screens out as much — if at all!

If you still want to lighten fonts a bit, you can add another media query to make the effect less severe. Depending which solution you’re using, you can raise the --font-weight-multiplier value closer to 1, raise the --GRAD value closer to 0, or disable --DRKM altogether (since it’s either on or off, with no in-between).

If you add this query, remember to place it below the original prefers-color-scheme query, or it may have no effect. Media queries don’t add CSS specificity, so their order matters!

@media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio: 2),         (prefers-color-scheme: dark) and (min-resolution: 192dpi) {    :root {     --font-weight-multiplier: .92;     /* Or, if you're using grade or darkmode axis instead: */     /* --GRAD: -.3; */     /* --DRKM: 0; */   } }

If you don’t want to lighten fonts at all on high density screens in dark mode, you can update your original dark mode prefers-color-scheme query to the following, to omit these screens:

@media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) and (-webkit-max-device-pixel-ratio: 1.9),         (prefers-color-scheme: dark) and (max-resolution: 191dpi) {     /* Custom properties for dark mode go here. */  }

Mixing fonts with different axes (and mixing variable fonts with non-variable fonts)

If you’re using more than one typeface on your site, you’ll need to consider what effects these adjustments may have on all of them. For example, if you’re using multiple fonts with intersecting axes, you could wind up accidentally combining the effects of multiple strategies (e.g. reducing both grade and weight simultaneously):

If your stylesheet includes solutions for several typefaces/axes, then the effect on fonts that have multiple axes (like this example’s Roboto Flex, which has both grade and weight axes) may be cumulative.

If all the fonts on your site are variable and have a grade axis with a matching scale and range (e.g. if they all range from -1 to 1), that’s the solution I’d recommend. However, you’ll have to revisit this if you plan to add other fonts later that don’t meet those criteria. Same goes for the darkmode axis, too, if it becomes more widespread.

If all your fonts are variable, but they don’t all share the same axes (e.g. grade and darkmode), then using only the --font-weight-multiplier custom property may be your safest bet.

Finally, if you’re mixing variable and non-variable fonts, know that the non-variable fonts will not change appearance with any of these solutions — with some exceptions. For example, if you’re using the font weight multiplier with the font-weight property, it is possible that some — but maybe not all — of your font weights will change enough to move to the next lower weight name.

Say your site includes a font with three weights: regular (400), semi-bold (600), and bold (700). In dark mode, your bold text may lighten up enough to display as semi-bold. But your regular font will still stay regular (as that’s the lowest weight included on the site). If you want to avoid that inconsistency, you could apply your variable font weights via font-variation-settings, and not font-weight, so your non-variable fonts aren’t affected at all. They’ll just always maintain their default weight in dark mode.

In closing

It’s always a happy coincidence when complementary technologies attain common usage near the same time. With the rise in popularity of both dark mode and variable fonts, we have the luxury of using the latter to mitigate one of the challenges of the former. Using CSS custom properties in conjunction with weight, grade, and darkmode axes, we can bring some consistency to the look of our text in both light and dark modes.

You can visit my interactive demo with the fonts and axes from this article.


The post Using CSS Custom Properties to Adjust Variable Font Weights in Dark Mode appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , , , , , , ,
[Top]

Color Theming with CSS Custom Properties and Tailwind

Custom properties not only enable us to make our code more efficient, but allow us to work some real magic with CSS too. One area where they have huge potential is theming. At Atomic Smash we use Tailwind CSS, a utility class framework, for writing our styles. In this article, we’ll look at how custom properties can be used for theming, and how we can integrate them with Tailwind to maximize the reusability of our code. We won’t cover getting up and running with Tailwind — check out the official documentation for that — but even if you’re new to it you might find some of these tips useful.

Theming overview

Let’s say we have a “Call To Action” (CTA) component with a heading, body copy, and button.

A box with a light red heading that reads join our mailing list above a dark red body that reads be the first to hear about our new offerings right before a red signup button.

Writing regular (non-Tailwind) CSS for this color scheme would look something like this:

.cta {   background-color: #742a2a; // dark red   color: #ffffff; //white }      .cta__heading {   background-color: #e53e3e; // medium red   color: #742a2a; } 
 .cta__button {   background-color: #e53e3e; }

Using Tailwind, we would apply these colors as utility classes in our HTML:

<div class="bg-red-900 text-white">   <h3 class="bg-red-600 text-red-900">Join our mailing list</h3>   <div>     <p>Be the first to hear about our new offerings</p>     <button class="bg-red-600" type="button">Sign up</button>   </div> </div>

I’ve deliberately left out classes relating to anything other than the basic color scheme, but you can see the example in its entirety in this demo:

Now, if we wanted to apply a different color scheme to our component, we would need to override the color values of our original component. Without Tailwind, a common way to do that would be to append a theme class to the component itself, and redefine the color values lower down in the cascade. So for a component with a modifier class of .cta--blue (using the BEM convention) we’ll apply the CSS values for a blue color scheme:

.cta--blue {   background-color: #2a4365; // dark blue } 
 .cta--blue .cta__heading {   background-color: #3182ce; // medium blue   color: #2a4365; } 
 .cta--blue .cta__button {   background-color: #3182ce; }
A box with a light blue heading that reads join our mailing list above a dark bluebody that reads be the first to hear about our new offerings right before a blue signup button.

If we’re using Sass or another preprocessor, it’s likely we’ll make life easier for ourselves by using variables for those color names, and we might nest the .cta__heading and .cta__body selectors. It doesn’t exactly make our code more concise, but it does make it more manageable by having a single place to update those values.

Now, suppose we have 10 different color schemes, as was my experience on a recent project. Our code starts to get longer, as we’re basically duplicating the above example 10 times in order to change those color values. Now imagine every component in our design system needs 10 color schemes, and many of those components are far more complex than our simple CTA. Maybe our themes need different fonts too. Suddenly we have a lot of CSS to write.

Theming with Tailwind

If we’re using Tailwind, on the other hand, we’d need to change multiple classes in the HTML itself. Even if we’re using a JavaScript framework, like React or Vue, this is not exactly a trivial task. In order to ensure unused styles are removed in a production build, Tailwind discourages the use of string concatenation for class names (at the time of writing). So building our themes means potentially piling a lot of logic into our components.

Theming with Custom Properties

By using custom properties for our color themes, we can drastically reduce the amount of code we need to write, and alleviate the maintenance burden. Let’s first take a look at how we can do this in regular CSS.

We define our custom properties as variables on the :root selector, making them global variables. (The body selector would serve us just as well.) Then we can use those variables in a selector, in place of our color property values:

:root {   --primary: #742a2a; // dark red;   --secondary: #e53e3e; // medium red } 
 .cta {   background-color: var(--primary);   color: white; } 
 .cta__heading {   background-color: var(--secondary);   color: var(--primary); } 
 .cta__button {   background-color: var(--secondary); }

This is where the real magic happens: now the code for creating each of our themes becomes a case of only updating those custom property values. The new values will be inherited wherever we apply our theme class:

.th-blue {   --primary: #2a4365; // dark blue   --secondary: #3182ce; // medium blue }

If we want a blue color scheme, we can apply that .th-blue class to the component, or even use it on the <body> tag to apply to apply a page-wide theme, which can be overridden on individual components as desired. Using a utility class potentially saves us writing even more code compared to a component-specific class (such as .cta--blue in the original code), as it could be applied anywhere in our codebase.

Handling older browsers

Like many agencies, plenty of our clients at Atomic Smash still require us to support Internet Explorer 11. While I’m okay with a progressive enhancement approach in most cases (by providing simpler fallback layouts for browsers that don’t support CSS Grid, for instance), I find theming is one area that often doesn’t allow for easy compromise. Clients want their brand colors and fonts seen, even on older browsers. Providing fallbacks using feature queries would entail a lot of extra work that would negate the benefits of using custom properties in the first place. To overcome this, we need a polyfill.

There are a couple of options for polyfilling custom properties in IE 11.

postcss-custom-properties

The first is using a PostCSS plugin called postcss-custom-properties. If you’re already using PostCSS in your workflow, this is fairly simple to add. It works by processing your CSS and outputting the result of the variable as the property value. So if you have the following CSS:

:root {   --color: red; } 
 h1 {   color: var(--color); }

The processed result will be:

h1 {   color: red;   color: var(--color); }

Browsers that don’t support custom properties will ignore the second rule and fall back to the regular property value. There is also an option to remove the rules with the custom properties in the output, so the file size will be smaller. This means that no browsers will get the custom property — which is an issue if you’re updating variables dynamically — but you’ll be able to use them for static values in your code with no ill effects.

Unfortunately this polyfill has some limitations:

  1. You need to specify the file (or files) in your config where you’re defining the custom properties.
  2. Custom properties can only be defined on the :root selector.

The first limitation is relatively trivial, but the second unfortunately renders this polyfill entirely useless for our theming use case. It means we can’t redefine variables on a selector to create our themes.

ie11CustomProperties

This polyfill option involves serving a client-side script, rather than preprocessing the CSS. We can add the following script to our head to ensure the polyfill will only be loaded in IE 11:

<script>window.MSInputMethodContext && document.documentMode && document.write('<script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/gh/nuxodin/ie11CustomProperties@4.1.0/ie11CustomProperties.min.js"></script>');</script>

This permits us to enjoy the full benefits of custom properties as in the examples here, so it’s the solution I decided to go with. It has a limitation where custom properties set in style attributes aren’t polyfilled. But I’ve tested it for the theming example above and it works just fine.

But what does this have to do with Tailwind? 

As we’ve already seen, utility classes — single-purpose classes that can be applied anywhere in our HTML — can make our code more reusable. That’s the main selling point of Tailwind and other utility class frameworks — the size of the CSS file you ship should end up smaller as a result. Tailwind makes multiple color classes available: .bg-red-medium would give us a red background-color property value, .text-red-medium for color and so on for border, box-shadow, or any place you can think of that you might need a color value. 

Colors can be defined in a config file:

module.exports = {   theme: {     colors: {       red: {         medium: '#e53e3e',         dark: '#742a2a'       },       blue: {         medium: '#3182ce',         dark: '#2a4365'       }     }   } }

If we want to use custom property values for our Tailwind classes, we can specify them in the config:

module.exports = {   theme: {     colors: {       'th-primary': 'var(--primary)',       'th-secondary': 'var(--secondary)'     }   } }

I’m prefixing my colors and theme-related class names with th- so that it’s obvious they’re specifically related to theming, but feel free to use whatever convention suits you.

Now those classes will be available to us through Tailwind. Using .bg-th-primary gives us the equivalent of writing:

.some-element {   background-color: var(--primary); }

In our CSS we can define our custom properties for our themes as before:

:root {   --primary: #742a2a;   --secondary: #742a2a; } 
 .th-blue {   --primary: #2a4365;   --secondary: #3182ce; }

Let’s apply those classes to our HTML. The first example gives us a component with our default theme (the variables defined on the :root). The second has our blue theme. The only difference is the addition of the .th-blue class on the component. (Once again, I’ve omitted the classes unrelated to the theme, for brevity and clarity.)

<!--Component with default (red) theme--> <div class="bg-th-primary">   <h3 class="bg-th-secondary text-th-primary">Join our mailing list</h3>   <div>     <p>Be the first to hear about our new offerings</p>     <button class="bg-th-secondary" type="button">Sign up</button>   </div> </div> 
 <!--Component with blue theme--> <div class="th-blue bg-th-primary">   <h3 class="bg-th-secondary text-th-primary">Join our mailing list</h3>   <div>     <p>Be the first to hear about our new offerings</p>     <button class="bg-th-secondary" type="button">Sign up</button>   </div> </div>

Using the config as a style guide

Tailwind encourages you to define all variables in the config, and personally I agree that it’s a better approach. It means that the config file can be a single source of truth rather than (potentially) ending up with multiple places to define your colors and other theme values. Luckily, we can also use values from the Tailwind config file for our custom properties. We’ll need to first define all of our colors in the config (assuming we’re not using the default color palette included with Tailwind):

module.exports = {   theme: {     colors: {       red: {         medium: '#e53e3e',         dark: '#742a2a'       },       blue: {         medium: '#3182ce',         dark: '#2a4365'       },       'th-primary': 'var(--primary)',       'th-secondary': 'var(--secondary)'     }   } }

Then we can access the theme object in the CSS:

:root {   --th-primary: theme('colors.red.dark');   --th-secondary: theme('colors.red.medium'); } 
 .th-blue {   --th-primary: theme('colors.blue.dark');   --th-secondary: theme('colors.blue.medium'); }

Wrapping up

I’m really excited about the benefits of being able to use custom properties without having to worry about browser support, even more so to be able to integrate them smoothly with our existing workflow. It’s hard to overstate the amount of time they will save us for theming. I hope that even if you’re not a Tailwind user, this article might encourage you to give custom properties a go for this use case.


The post Color Theming with CSS Custom Properties and Tailwind appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , , ,
[Top]

Using @property for CSS Custom Properties

Una Kravetz digs into how Chrome now allows you to declare CSS custom properties directly from CSS with more information than just a string.

So rather than something like this:

html {   --stop: 50%; }

…can be declared with more details like this:

@property --stop {   syntax: "<percentage>";   initial-value: 50%;   inherits: false; }

The browser then knows this specific custom property is a percentage rather than a string. It can be other useful stuff like <integer> and <color>. Now that we have a way to communicate this sort of information to the browser, we get some new abilities, like being able to transition between two values.

While playing around, I noticed you have to very specifically call out the property to be transitioned (because a catch-all transition won’t do it). Try hovering on this demo, which is a re-creation of what Una did in the post:

Note that I’m animating the color stop’s position (which is a percentage), but I’m also trying to animate the color, which still does not work. I assumed it would with this new feature. I know people have been confused about the lack of being able to animate gradients for a long time. (See Ana Tudor’s article.)

You can always re-declare the properties somewhere at a high-level to “support” browsers that can’t read custom properties. Feels like a funny time to be talking about that. Safari seems to signal strong interest in this Houdini-based stuff, but hasn’t yet. Firefox? Eeesh, I dunno. Best we know is they labeled it as “Worth Prototyping” before all the layoffs.

This will also help with a the weird fallback issue with CSS custom properties that we mentioned in the newsletter:

As with any other custom property, you can get (using var) or set (write/rewrite) values, but with Houdini custom properties, if you set a falsey value when overriding it, the CSS rendering engine will send the initial value (its fallback value) instead of ignoring the line.


The post Using @property for CSS Custom Properties appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , ,
[Top]

Timer Bars in CSS with Custom Properties

I was working on a thing the other day that needed a visible timer. There was UI precedent for this type of timer on the project. People didn’t want to see numbers ticking downward; it was more ideal to see a “bar” drain away from full to empty. I mention that because there are tons and tons of ways you could approach a “timer” UI. This isn’t an exploration of all of those (a search on CodePen would be more helpful there), but an exploration of the one way that was useful to me.

The kind of timer I needed was what the project called a “round time” bar. An action is performed. It may cause a round time, and most further actions are blocked until the round time is over. So, a very clear red bar that ticks away was the right UI. It gives a sense of rhythm and flow where you can kinda feel the end of the timer and time your next action.

a linear animation that shrinks the bar to zero.

Setting this up is fairly easy…

Let’s give ourselves a parent/child thing, just in case we want to style the empty part of the container at some point.

<div class="round-time-bar">   <div></div> </div>

For now, let’s just style the bar inside.

.round-time-bar div {   height: 5px;   background: linear-gradient(to bottom, red, #900); }

That gives us a nice little red bar we can use for the time indicator.

Next we need to make it tick down, but here’s where we need to think about functionality. A timer like this needs to know how long it’s timing! We can give it that information right in the HTML. This doesn’t mean we’re avoiding JavaScript — we’re embracing it. We’re saying, “hey JavaScript, please give us the duration as a variable and we’ll take it from there.”

<div class="round-time-bar" style="--duration: 5;">   <div></div> </div>

In fact, this way is very friendly to modern DOM-handling JavaScript. As long as that --variable is correct, it is free to re-render that DOM element at any time and we can make sure the design handles that just fine. We’ll make a variation that does that.

For now, let’s make the animation happen. Good news, it’s easy. Here’s a one-liner keyframe:

@keyframes roundtime {   to {     /* More performant than animating `width` */     transform: scaleX(0);   } }

We can “squish” the bar because the design of the bar doesn’t have anything that will look squished when we scale it horizontally. If we did, we could animate the width. It’s not that big of a deal, especially since it doesn’t reflow anything else.

Now we apply it to the bar:

.round-time-bar div {   /* ... */   animation: roundtime calc(var(--duration) * 1s) steps(var(--duration)) forwards;   transform-origin: left center; }

See how we’re yanking that --duration variable to set the duration of the animation? That does the heavy lifting. I’m also using it to set the same number of steps() so it “ticks” down. That “ticking” might be a visual UI thing that you like (I do), but it also accommodates the idea that JavaScript might re-render this bar at any time, and the ticks make it so you are less likely to notice. I used an integer for the duration value so that it could do double-duty like this.

If you want a smooth animation though, we could do that as a variation, like:

<div class="round-time-bar" data-style="smooth" ... />

Then not do the steps:

.round-time-bar[data-style="smooth"] div {   animation: roundtime calc(var(--duration) * 1s) linear forwards; }

Note we’re also using a linear animation, which seems to make sense for a timer. Time, as it were, doesn’t ease. Or does it? Whatever, it’s your call. If you want a timer that appears to speed up or slow down at certain points, go for it.

We can use the same variation data-attribute-driven API for things like color variations:

.round-time-bar[data-color="blue"] div {   background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #64b5f6, #1565c0); }

And one final variation is making each “second” a fixed width. That way, a 10 second timer will literally look longer than a 5 second timer:

.round-time-bar[data-style="fixed"] div {   width: calc(var(--duration) * 5%); }

Here’s the demo:

Notice the little trick in there for restarting CSS animation.

Oh, and hey, I know there is a <meter> element which is maybe a bit more semantic, but it brings it’s own UI which isn’t animatable like I wanted things to be here — at least not without fighting it. But I wonder if it’s more accessible? Does it announce its current value in a useful way? Would it be a more accessible timer if we were updating a <meter> in real-time with JavaScript? If anyone knows, I can link up a solution here.


The post Timer Bars in CSS with Custom Properties appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , ,
[Top]

How to Get All Custom Properties on a Page in JavaScript

We can use JavaScript to get the value of a CSS custom property. Robin wrote up a detailed explanation about this in Get a CSS Custom Property Value with JavaScript. To review, let’s say we’ve declared a single custom property on the HTML element:

html {   --color-accent: #00eb9b; }

In JavaScript, we can access the value with getComputedStyle and getPropertyValue:

const colorAccent = getComputedStyle(document.documentElement)   .getPropertyValue('--color-accent'); // #00eb9b

Perfect. Now we have access to our accent color in JavaScript. You know what’s cool? If we change that color in CSS, it updates in JavaScript as well! Handy.

What happens, though, when it’s not just one property we need access to in JavaScript, but a whole bunch of them?

html {   --color-accent: #00eb9b;   --color-accent-secondary: #9db4ff;   --color-accent-tertiary: #f2c0ea;   --color-text: #292929;   --color-divider: #d7d7d7; }

We end up with JavaScript that looks like this:

const colorAccent = getComputedStyle(document.documentElement).getPropertyValue('--color-accent'); // #00eb9b const colorAccentSecondary = getComputedStyle(document.documentElement).getPropertyValue('--color-accent-secondary'); // #9db4ff const colorAccentTertiary = getComputedStyle(document.documentElement).getPropertyValue('--color-accent-tertiary'); // #f2c0ea const colorText = getComputedStyle(document.documentElement).getPropertyValue('--color-text'); // #292929 const colorDivider = getComputedStyle(document.documentElement).getPropertyValue('--color-text'); // #d7d7d7

We’re repeating ourselves a lot. We could shorten each one of these lines by abstracting the common tasks to a function.

const getCSSProp = (element, propName) => getComputedStyle(element).getPropertyValue(propName); const colorAccent = getCSSProp(document.documentElement, '--color-accent'); // #00eb9b // repeat for each custom property...

That helps reduce code repetition, but we still have a less-than-ideal situation. Every time we add a custom property in CSS, we have to write another line of JavaScript to access it. This can and does work fine if we only have a few custom properties. I’ve used this setup on production projects before. But, it’s also possible to automate this.

Let’s walk through the process of automating it by making a working thing.

What are we making?

We’ll make a color palette, which is a common feature in pattern libraries. We’ll generate a grid of color swatches from our CSS custom properties. 

Here’s the complete demo that we’ll build step-by-step.

A preview of our CSS custom property-driven color palette. Showing six cards, one for each color, including the custom property name and hex value in each card.
Here’s what we’re aiming for.

Let’s set the stage. We’ll use an unordered list to display our palette. Each swatch is a <li> element that we’ll render with JavaScript. 

<ul class="colors"></ul>

The CSS for the grid layout isn’t pertinent to the technique in this post, so we won’t look at in detail. It’s available in the CodePen demo.

Now that we have our HTML and CSS in place, we’ll focus on the JavaScript. Here’s an outline of what we’ll do with our code:

  1. Get all stylesheets on a page, both external and internal
  2. Discard any stylesheets hosted on third-party domains
  3. Get all rules for the remaining stylesheets
  4. Discard any rules that aren’t basic style rules
  5. Get the name and value of all CSS properties
  6. Discard non-custom CSS properties
  7. Build HTML to display the color swatches

Let’s get to it.

Step 1: Get all stylesheets on a page

The first thing we need to do is get all external and internal stylesheets on the current page. Stylesheets are available as members of the global document.

document.styleSheets

That returns an array-like object. We want to use array methods, so we’ll convert it to an array. Let’s also put this in a function that we’ll use throughout this post.

const getCSSCustomPropIndex = () => [...document.styleSheets];

When we invoke getCSSCustomPropIndex, we see an array of CSSStyleSheet objects, one for each external and internal stylesheet on the current page.

The output of getCSSCustomPropIndex, an array of CSSStyleSheet objects

Step 2: Discard third-party stylesheets

If our script is running on https://example.com any stylesheet we want to inspect must also be on https://example.com. This is a security feature. From the MDN docs for CSSStyleSheet:

In some browsers, if a stylesheet is loaded from a different domain, accessing cssRules results in SecurityError.

That means that if the current page links to a stylesheet hosted on https://some-cdn.com, we can’t get custom properties — or any styles — from it. The approach we’re taking here only works for stylesheets hosted on the current domain.

CSSStyleSheet objects have an href property. Its value is the full URL to the stylesheet, like https://example.com/styles.css. Internal stylesheets have an href property, but the value will be null.

Let’s write a function that discards third-party stylesheets. We’ll do that by comparing the stylesheet’s href value to the current location.origin.

const isSameDomain = (styleSheet) => {   if (!styleSheet.href) {     return true;   } 
   return styleSheet.href.indexOf(window.location.origin) === 0; };

Now we use isSameDomain as a filter ondocument.styleSheets.

const getCSSCustomPropIndex = () => [...document.styleSheets]   .filter(isSameDomain);

With the third-party stylesheets discarded, we can inspect the contents of those remaining.

Step 3: Get all rules for the remaining stylesheets

Our goal for getCSSCustomPropIndex is to produce an array of arrays. To get there, we’ll use a combination of array methods to loop through, find values we want, and combine them. Let’s take a first step in that direction by producing an array containing every style rule.

const getCSSCustomPropIndex = () => [...document.styleSheets]   .filter(isSameDomain)   .reduce((finalArr, sheet) => finalArr.concat(...sheet.cssRules), []);

We use reduce and concat because we want to produce a flat array where every first-level element is what we’re interested in. In this snippet, we iterate over individual CSSStyleSheet objects. For each one of them, we need its cssRules. From the MDN docs:

The read-only CSSStyleSheet property cssRules returns a live CSSRuleList which provides a real-time, up-to-date list of every CSS rule which comprises the stylesheet. Each item in the list is a CSSRule defining a single rule.

Each CSS rule is the selector, braces, and property declarations. We use the spread operator ...sheet.cssRules to take every rule out of the cssRules object and place it in finalArr. When we log the output of getCSSCustomPropIndex, we get a single-level array of CSSRule objects.

Example output of getCSSCustomPropIndex producing an array of CSSRule objects

This gives us all the CSS rules for all the stylesheets. We want to discard some of those, so let’s move on.

Step 4: Discard any rules that aren’t basic style rules

CSS rules come in different types. CSS specs define each of the types with a constant name and integer. The most common type of rule is the CSSStyleRule. Another type of rule is the CSSMediaRule. We use those to define media queries, like @media (min-width: 400px) {}. Other types include CSSSupportsRule, CSSFontFaceRule, and CSSKeyframesRule. See the Type constants section of the MDN docs for CSSRule for the full list.

We’re only interested in rules where we define custom properties and, for the purposes in this post, we’ll focus on CSSStyleRule. That does leave out the CSSMediaRule rule type where it’s valid to define custom properties. We could use an approach that’s similar to what we’re using to extract custom properties in this demo, but we’ll exclude this specific rule type to limit the scope of the demo.

To narrow our focus to style rules, we’ll write another array filter:

const isStyleRule = (rule) => rule.type === 1;

Every CSSRule has a type property that returns the integer for that type constant. We use isStyleRule to filter sheet.cssRules.

const getCSSCustomPropIndex = () => [...document.styleSheets]   .filter(isSameDomain)   .reduce((finalArr, sheet) => finalArr.concat(     [...sheet.cssRules].filter(isStyleRule)   ), []);

One thing to note is that we are wrapping ...sheet.cssRules in brackets so we can use the array method filter.

Our stylesheet only had CSSStyleRules so the demo results are the same as before. If our stylesheet had media queries or font-face declarations, isStyleRule would discard them.

Step 5: Get the name and value of all properties

Now that we have the rules we want, we can get the properties that make them up. CSSStyleRule objects have a style property that is a CSSStyleDeclaration object. It’s made up of standard CSS properties, like color, font-family, and border-radius, plus custom properties. Let’s add that to our getCSSCustomPropIndex function so that it looks at every rule, building an array of arrays along the way:

const getCSSCustomPropIndex = () => [...document.styleSheets]   .filter(isSameDomain)   .reduce((finalArr, sheet) => finalArr.concat(     [...sheet.cssRules]       .filter(isStyleRule)       .reduce((propValArr, rule) => {         const props = []; /* TODO: more work needed here */         return [...propValArr, ...props];       }, [])   ), []);

If we invoke this now, we get an empty array. We have more work to do, but this lays the foundation. Because we want to end up with an array, we start with an empty array by using the accumulator, which is the second parameter of reduce. In the body of the reduce callback function, we have a placeholder variable, props, where we’ll gather the properties. The return statement combines the array from the previous iteration — the accumulator — with the current props array.

Right now, both are empty arrays. We need to use rule.style to populate props with an array for every property/value in the current rule:

const getCSSCustomPropIndex = () => [...document.styleSheets]   .filter(isSameDomain)   .reduce((finalArr, sheet) => finalArr.concat(     [...sheet.cssRules]       .filter(isStyleRule)       .reduce((propValArr, rule) => {         const props = [...rule.style].map((propName) => [           propName.trim(),           rule.style.getPropertyValue(propName).trim()         ]);         return [...propValArr, ...props];       }, [])   ), []);

rule.style is array-like, so we use the spread operator again to put each member of it into an array that we loop over with map. In the map callback, we return an array with two members. The first member is propName (which includes color, font-family, --color-accent, etc.). The second member is the value of each property. To get that, we use the getPropertyValue method of CSSStyleDeclaration. It takes a single parameter, the string name of the CSS property. 

We use trim on both the name and value to make sure we don’t include any leading or trailing whitespace that sometimes gets left behind.

Now when we invoke getCSSCustomPropIndex, we get an array of arrays. Every child array contains a CSS property name and a value.

Output of getCSSCustomPropIndex showing an array of arrays containing every property name and value

This is what we’re looking for! Well, almost. We’re getting every property in addition to custom properties. We need one more filter to remove those standard properties because all we want are the custom properties.

Step 6: Discard non-custom properties

To determine if a property is custom, we can look at the name. We know custom properties must start with two dashes (--). That’s unique in the CSS world, so we can use that to write a filter function:

([propName]) => propName.indexOf("--") === 0)

Then we use it as a filter on the props array:

const getCSSCustomPropIndex = () =>   [...document.styleSheets].filter(isSameDomain).reduce(     (finalArr, sheet) =>       finalArr.concat(         [...sheet.cssRules].filter(isStyleRule).reduce((propValArr, rule) => {           const props = [...rule.style]             .map((propName) => [               propName.trim(),               rule.style.getPropertyValue(propName).trim()             ])             .filter(([propName]) => propName.indexOf("--") === 0); 
           return [...propValArr, ...props];         }, [])       ),     []   );

In the function signature, we have ([propName]). There, we’re using array destructuring to access the first member of every child array in props. From there, we do an indexOf check on the name of the property. If -- is not at the beginning of the prop name, then we don’t include it in the props array.

When we log the result, we have the exact output we’re looking for: An array of arrays for every custom property and its value with no other properties.

The output of getCSSCustomPropIndex showing an array of arrays containing every custom property and its value

Looking more toward the future, creating the property/value map doesn’t have to require so much code. There’s an alternative in the CSS Typed Object Model Level 1 draft that uses CSSStyleRule.styleMap. The styleMap property is an array-like object of every property/value of a CSS rule. We don’t have it yet, but If we did, we could shorten our above code by removing the map:

// ... const props = [...rule.styleMap.entries()].filter(/*same filter*/); // ...

At the time of this writing, Chrome and Edge have implementations of styleMap but no other major browsers do. Because styleMap is in a draft, there’s no guarantee that we’ll actually get it, and there’s no sense using it for this demo. Still, it’s fun to know it’s a future possibility!

We have the data structure we want. Now let’s use the data to display color swatches.

Step 7: Build HTML to display the color swatches

Getting the data into the exact shape we needed was the hard work. We need one more bit of JavaScript to render our beautiful color swatches. Instead of logging the output of getCSSCustomPropIndex, let’s store it in variable.

const cssCustomPropIndex = getCSSCustomPropIndex();

Here’s the HTML we used to create our color swatch at the start of this post:

<ul class="colors"></ul>

We’ll use innerHTML to populate that list with a list item for each color:

document.querySelector(".colors").innerHTML = cssCustomPropIndex.reduce(   (str, [prop, val]) => `$ {str}<li class="color">     <b class="color__swatch" style="--color: $ {val}"></b>     <div class="color__details">       <input value="$ {prop}" readonly />       <input value="$ {val}" readonly />     </div>    </li>`,   "");

We use reduce to iterate over the custom prop index and build a single HTML-looking string for innerHTML. But reduce isn’t the only way to do this. We could use a map and join or forEach. Any method of building the string will work here. This is just my preferred way to do it.

I want to highlight a couple specific bits of code. In the reduce callback signature, we’re using array destructuring again with [prop, val], this time to access both members of each child array. We then use the prop and val variables in the body of the function.

To show the example of each color, we use a b element with an inline style:

<b class="color__swatch" style="--color: $ {val}"></b>

That means we end up with HTML that looks like:

<b class="color__swatch" style="--color: #00eb9b"></b>

But how does that set a background color? In the full CSS we use the custom property --color as the value of  background-color for each .color__swatch. Because external CSS rules inherit from inline styles, --color  is the value we set on the b element.

.color__swatch {   background-color: var(--color);   /* other properties */ }

We now have an HTML display of color swatches representing our CSS custom properties!


This demo focuses on colors, but the technique isn’t limited to custom color props. There’s no reason we couldn’t expand this approach to generate other sections of a pattern library, like fonts, spacing, grid settings, etc. Anything that might be stored as a custom property can be displayed on a page automatically using this technique.

The post How to Get All Custom Properties on a Page in JavaScript appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , ,
[Top]

Global CSS options with custom properties

With a preprocessor, like Sass, building a logical “do this or don’t” setting is fairly straightforward:

$  option: false;  @mixin doThing {   @if $  option {     do-thing: yep;   } }  .el {   @include doThing; }

Can we do that in native CSS with custom properties? Mark Otto shows that we can. It’s just a smidge different.

html {   --component-shadow: 0 .5rem 1rem rgba(0,0,0,.1); }  .component {   box-shadow: var(--component-shadow); }  <!-- override the global anywhere more specific! like      <div class="component remove-shadow">      or      <body class="remove-shadow"> --> .remove-shadow {   --component-shadow: none; }

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

The post Global CSS options with custom properties appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , ,
[Top]