Tag: product

Let’s Make One of Those Fancy Scrolling Animations Used on Apple Product Pages

Apple is well-known for the sleek animations on their product pages. For example, as you scroll down the page products may slide into view, MacBooks fold open and iPhones spin, all while showing off the hardware, demonstrating the software and telling interactive stories of how the products are used.

Just check out this video of the mobile web experience for the iPad Pro:

Source: Twitter

A lot of the effects that you see there aren’t created in just HTML and CSS. What then, you ask? Well, it can be a little hard to figure out. Even using the browser’s DevTools won’t always reveal the answer, as it often can’t see past a <canvas> element.

Let’s take an in-depth look at one of these effects to see how it’s made so you can recreate some of these magical effects in our own projects. Specifically, let’s replicate the AirPods Pro product page and the shifting light effect in the hero image.

The basic concept

The idea is to create an animation just like a sequence of images in rapid succession. You know, like a flip book! No complex WebGL scenes or advanced JavaScript libraries are needed.

By synchronizing each frame to the user’s scroll position, we can play the animation as the user scrolls down (or back up) the page.

Start with the markup and styles

The HTML and CSS for this effect is very easy as the magic happens inside the <canvas> element which we control with JavaScript by giving it an ID.

In CSS, we’ll give our document a height of 100vh and make our <body> 5⨉ taller than that to give ourselves the necessary scroll length to make this work. We’ll also match the background color of the document with the background color of our images.

The last thing we’ll do is position the <canvas>, center it, and limit the max-width and height so it does not exceed the dimensions of the viewport.

html {   height: 100vh; } 
 body {   background: #000;   height: 500vh; } 
 canvas {   position: fixed;   left: 50%;   top: 50%;   max-height: 100vh;   max-width: 100vw;   transform: translate(-50%, -50%); }

Right now, we are able to scroll down the page (even though the content does not exceed the viewport height) and our <canvas> stays at the top of the viewport. That’s all the HTML and CSS we need.

Let’s move on to loading the images.

Fetching the correct images

Since we’ll be working with an image sequence (again, like a flip book), we’ll assume the file names are numbered sequentially in ascending order (i.e. 0001.jpg, 0002.jpg, 0003.jpg, etc.) in the same directory.

We’ll write a function that returns the file path with the number of the image file we want, based off of the user’s scroll position.

const currentFrame = index => (   `https://www.apple.com/105/media/us/airpods-pro/2019/1299e2f5_9206_4470_b28e_08307a42f19b/anim/sequence/large/01-hero-lightpass/$ {index.toString().padStart(4, '0')}.jpg` )

Since the image number is an integer, we’ll need to turn it in to a string and use padStart(4, '0') to prepend zeros in front of our index until we reach four digits to match our file names. So, for example, passing 1 into this function will return 0001.

That gives us a way to handle image paths. Here’s the first image in the sequence drawn on the <canvas> element:

As you can see, the first image is on the page. At this point, it’s just a static file. What we want is to update it based on the user’s scroll position. And we don’t merely want to load one image file and then swap it out by loading another image file. We want to draw the images on the <canvas> and update the drawing with the next image in the sequence (but we’ll get to that in just a bit).

We already made the function to generate the image filepath based on the number we pass into it so what we need to do now is track the user’s scroll position and determine the corresponding image frame for that scroll position.

Connecting images to the user’s scroll progress

To know which number we need to pass (and thus which image to load) in the sequence, we need to calculate the user’s scroll progress. We’ll make an event listener to track that and handle some math to calculate which image to load.

We need to know:

  • Where scrolling starts and ends
  • The user’s scroll progress (i.e. a percentage of how far the user is down the page)
  • The image that corresponds to the user’s scroll progress

We’ll use scrollTop to get the vertical scroll position of the element, which in our case happens to be the top of the document. That will serve as the starting point value. We’ll get the end (or maximum) value by subtracting the window height from the document scroll height. From there, we’ll divide the scrollTop value by the maximum value the user can scroll down, which gives us the user’s scroll progress.

Then we need to turn that scroll progress into an index number that corresponds with the image numbering sequence for us to return the correct image for that position. We can do this by multiplying the progress number by the number of frames (images) we have. We’ll use Math.floor() to round that number down and wrap it in Math.min() with our maximum frame count so it never exceeds the total number of frames.

window.addEventListener('scroll', () => {     const scrollTop = html.scrollTop;   const maxScrollTop = html.scrollHeight - window.innerHeight;   const scrollFraction = scrollTop / maxScrollTop;   const frameIndex = Math.min(     frameCount - 1,     Math.floor(scrollFraction * frameCount)   ); });

Updating <canvas> with the correct image

We now know which image we need to draw as the user’s scroll progress changes. This is where the magic of  <canvas> comes into play. <canvas> has many cool features for building everything from games and animations to design mockup generators and everything in between!

One of those features is a method called requestAnimationFrame that works with the browser to update <canvas> in a way we couldn’t do if we were working with straight image files instead. This is why I went with a <canvas> approach instead of, say, an <img> element or a <div> with a background image.

requestAnimationFrame will match the browser refresh rate and enable hardware acceleration by using WebGL to render it using the device’s video card or integrated graphics. In other words, we’ll get super smooth transitions between frames — no image flashes!

Let’s call this function in our scroll event listener to swap images as the user scrolls up or down the page. requestAnimationFrame takes a callback argument, so we’ll pass a function that will update the image source and draw the new image on the <canvas>:

requestAnimationFrame(() => updateImage(frameIndex + 1))

We’re bumping up the frameIndex by 1 because, while the image sequence starts at 0001.jpg, our scroll progress calculation starts actually starts at 0. This ensures that the two values are always aligned.

The callback function we pass to update the image looks like this:

const updateImage = index => {   img.src = currentFrame(index);   context.drawImage(img, 0, 0); }

We pass the frameIndex into the function. That sets the image source with the next image in the sequence, which is drawn on our <canvas> element.

Even better with image preloading

We’re technically done at this point. But, come on, we can do better! For example, scrolling quickly results in a little lag between image frames. That’s because every new image sends off a new network request, requiring a new download.

We should try preloading the images new network requests. That way, each frame is already downloaded, making the transitions that much faster, and the animation that much smoother!

All we’ve gotta do is loop through the entire sequence of images and load ‘em up:

const frameCount = 148; 
 const preloadImages = () => {   for (let i = 1; i < frameCount; i++) {     const img = new Image();     img.src = currentFrame(i);   } }; 
 preloadImages();

Demo!

A quick note on performance

While this effect is pretty slick, it’s also a lot of images. 148 to be exact.

No matter much we optimize the images, or how speedy the CDN is that serves them, loading hundreds of images will always result in a bloated page. Let’s say we have multiple instances of this on the same page. We might get performance stats like this:

1,609 requests, 55.8 megabytes transferred, 57.5 megabytes resources, load time of 30.45 seconds.

That might be fine for a high-speed internet connection without tight data caps, but we can’t say the same for users without such luxuries. It’s a tricky balance to strike, but we have to be mindful of everyone’s experience — and how our decisions affect them.

A few things we can do to help strike that balance include:

  • Loading a single fallback image instead of the entire image sequence
  • Creating sequences that use smaller image files for certain devices
  • Allowing the user to enable the sequence, perhaps with a button that starts and stops the sequence

Apple employs the first option. If you load the AirPods Pro page on a mobile device connected to a slow 3G connection and, hey, the performance stats start to look a whole lot better:

8 out of 111 requests, 347 kilobytes of 2.6 megabytes transferred, 1.4 megabytes of 4.5 megabytes resources, load time of one minute and one second.

Yeah, it’s still a heavy page. But it’s a lot lighter than what we’d get without any performance considerations at all. That’s how Apple is able to get get so many complex sequences onto a single page.


Further reading

If you are interested in how these image sequences are generated, a good place to start is the Lottie library by AirBnB. The docs take you through the basics of generating animations with After Effects while providing an easy way to include them in projects.

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Product Search and Filters Are a Snap With WooCommerce

Let’s say you visit an e-commerce site because you want to buy the latest banana peeler model. Bananas are hard enough to peel, right? Only a tool will do!

What’s the first thing you’re going to do on the site? Chances are, it’s entering something into the (hopefully) prominent search field. You need a way to tell the store what you’re looking for in order to get recommendations and that’s the first step.

What’s next? Again, chances are you will need to get more specific with what you’re looking for. You may need the search results to be filtered to get a more precise and increase the chance that your banana peeler surfaces to the top. That might be filtering by a specific brand, color, size, availability, or whatever.

Developing an e-commerce site is already a difficult task and throwing in things like search and filters make it even tougher. That’s why WooCommerce is worth looking into. It’s a WordPress plugin that transforms any site into a full-fledged e-commerce machine, complete with product inventory, shipping methods, payment gateways and, yes, front-end functionality for things like search and filtering.

Take the latest WooCommerce release for example. It introduces a new “All Products” block for the Gutenburg block editor. You can literally drop this block on any WordPress page and it will render a fully customizable grid of products from your inventory. Pretty slick!

Photo courtesy of WooCommerce

And what about filtering? There are specific blocks for that too. Drop any number of filtering options on the same page as the All Products block and the filters will automatically know to filter from the products in the block. And there’s a ton of ways to filter products, including price and attributes (e.g. color, size, etc.). Oh, and filters can be combined, of course, so they can be used together for even more fine-grained search results.

Photo courtesy of WooCommerce

This is just one of the many, many ways WooCommerce is lowering the bar to entry for e-commerce while setting high standards for what to expect on an e-commerce site. It’s free and has been downloaded more than 40 million times… now it’s your turn to give it a spin.

If you’re thinking of pulling the trigger on WooCommerce and think you might need to buy some plugins, it’s about to the absolute perfect time of year to do that. Kicking off on Black Friday and running through Cyber Monday, literally everything WooCommerce is 40% off. And if you’d rather do eCommerce on a totally hosted platform, WordPress.com can do that and that’s all 20% off.

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While solving for collaboration, we built a product that our own teams love and use everyday!

(This is a sponsored post.)

Flock is a messaging and collaboration tool built for both designers and developers. With close-to-zero setup, it brings together all your team’s conversations, appointments, and files in one place, helping you spend more time on what you are best at — building awesome stuff!

Building software is hard. Building software that is a delight to use every day is even harder, given the exacting standards most of us in the design and development community have for our tools. So, when we set out to change how people communicate in the modern workplace, we had but one goal – build something that we would objectively love!

Today, thousands of design and development teams use Flock every day, validating our UX-led approach to building a team collaboration tool for all kinds of teams. But how did we get here? Here’s our story.

At Flock, our designers frequently share creatives and design assets with the rest of the organization and using email to share links to files gets real old, real fast. So we started by looking at one of the biggest challenges to efficient collaboration at work — the “app-juggling” one had to master even for something as simple as sharing a file.

“Emails on one platform, files on another, real-time conversations on yet another one, and we would often need to shuffle between these apps to find and share relevant files with team members. That was an invisible time-sink!”
—Aaron Durham, Designer at Flock

We realized that bringing together our files and the conversations around them in one place would save us a lot of time and effort, and built integrations for Flock with Google Drive, OneDrive, Box, and Dropbox. Now, it is incredibly easy to find and share relevant files from the sidebar and discuss them with the team immediately, with dynamic previews and permission controls.

The next challenge we tackled was the time spent in getting feedback on designs and prototypes from colleagues in our geographically distributed design and development team. We knew that it was difficult to convey visual feedback on creatives through plain text/emails because our designers often struggled to understand what part of an illustration the feedback was aimed at.

And then, we thought, “Wouldn’t it be so much easier if we could hop on a call and show colleagues exactly what we see?” So, we built a seamless video and audio conferencing experience into Flock that allows us to start a video call with one or more team members and walk them through the feedback by sharing screens.

Like most startups, we have a few irons in the fire at any given time. So, one group of designers and developers might be working on a prototype of our newest product while another group works on landing pages for a marketing campaign. Conversations around these projects need to happen simultaneously and seamlessly. But with a team of over a hundred rock-stars, it’s difficult to keep track of conversations on various projects and keep those conversations on track. We had to create a system that accomplished both.

So, for every project, the Project Lead creates a Channel on Flock (a group conversation) where everyone involved can discuss the project. We create other channels for shared interests and water-cooler chats, so conversations in project channels are focused and more efficient.

Another reason for the dreaded “app-juggling” act? Our designers and developers use a lot of apps and services that they have to check for updates at various times of the day. So we built integrations for third-party services right into Flock. Now, team members receive notifications from all their favorite apps in one place — Flock — and can choose to take action when required.

Our App Store has over 60 integrations with popular third-party business apps and services, so we can work with all our favorite tools in one place. And we can connect hundreds of applications and web services to Flock using Zapier and IFTTT. From Dribble and Asana to Jira and GitHub, we connect almost every service we use to Flock. Last but not least, developers can build custom apps and integrations using our open API.

Many early adopters of Flock were teams with designers and developers who were happy to share feedback. We found that a lot of these teams worked with external consultants or clients, particularly at creative agencies. And these conversations were, again, on email, on the phone or, sometimes, verbal instructions with no record for later reference.

To ensure all these conversations could be brought into one window, we created Guests in Flock, an incredibly simple way of adding external collaborators to team workflows while maintaining a firewall of access between conversations within the team and conversations with guest users. This makes it easier to collaborate with clients and consultants, feedback can be shared and acted upon in real-time, and the built-in image annotation feature allows designers to share visual feedback on creatives.

Our thinking from the get-go has been that effective communication is a basic utility in every workplace, and it should add to productivity way more than it does to expenses. Which is why we priced Flock starting from free, with an option to unlock all functionality for $ 4.50 a user per month on the Pro plan — a third as much as our competitors.

Our designers and developers have found incredible success in building Flock and becoming its first power users, and the business case for adopting a team collaboration platform has never been clearer. Whether one wants to discuss ideas, share collateral’s, collect feedback from teammates and clients, or get code-push notifications from Gitlab, Flock just works.

Try Flock Now

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