Tag: Platform

Weekly Platform News: Reduced Motion, CORS, WhiteHouse.gov, popups, and 100vw

In this week’s roundup, we highlight a proposal for a new <popup> element, check the use of prefers-reduced-motion on award-winning sites, learn how to opt into cross-origin isolation, see how WhiteHouse.gov approaches accessibility, and warn the dangers of 100vh.

Let’s get into the news!

The new HTML <popup> element is in development

On January 21, Melanie Richards from the Microsoft Edge web platform team posted an explainer for a proposed HTML <popup> element (the name is not final). A few hours later, Mason Freed from Google announced an intent to prototype this element in the Blink browser engine. Work on the implementation is taking place in Chromium issue #1168738.

A popup is a temporary (transient) and “light-dismissable” UI element that is displayed on the the “top layer” of all other elements. The goal for the <popup> element is to be fully stylable and accessible by default. A <popup> can be anchored to an activating element, such as a button, but it can also be a standalone element that is displayed on page load (e.g., a teaching UI).

Two use cases showing a white action menu with four gray menu links below a blue menu button, and another example of a blog button with a large dark blue tooltip beneath it with two paragraphs of text in white.

A <popup> is automatically hidden when the user presses the Esc key or moves focus to a different element (this is called a light dismissal). Unlike the <dialog> element, only one <popup> can be shown at a time, and unlike the deprecated <menu> element, a <popup> can contain arbitrary content, including interactive elements:

We imagine <popup> as being useful for various different types of popover UI. We’ve chosen to use an action menu as a primary example, but folks use popup-esque patterns for many different types of content.

Award-winning websites should honor the “reduce motion” preference

Earlier this week, AWWWARDS announced the winners of their annual awards for the best websites of 2020. The following websites were awarded:

All these websites are highly dynamic and show full-screen motion on load and during scroll. Unfortunately, such animations can cause dizziness and nausea in people with vestibular disorders. Websites are therefore advised to reduce or turn off non-essential animations via the prefers-reduced-motion media query, which evaluates to true for people who have expressed their preference for reduced motion (e.g., the “Reduce motion” option on Apple’s platforms). None of the winning websites do this.

/* (code from animal-crossing.com) */ @media (prefers-reduced-motion: reduce) {   .main-header__scene {     animation: none;   } }

An example of a website that does this correctly is the official site of last year’s Animal Crossing game. Not only does the website honor the user’s preference via prefers-reduced-motion, but it also provides its own “Reduce motion” toggle button at the very top of the page.

Screenshot of the animal crossing game website that is bright with a solid green header above a gold ribbon that displays menu items. Below is the main banner showing a still of the animated game with a wooden welcome to Animal Crossing sign in the foreground.

(via Eric Bailey)

Websites can now opt into cross-origin isolation

Cross-origin isolation is part of a “long-term security improvement.” Websites can opt into cross-origin isolation by adding the following two HTTP response headers, which are already supported in Chrome and Firefox:

Cross-Origin-Embedder-Policy: require-corp Cross-Origin-Opener-Policy: same-origin

A cross-origin-isolated page relinquishes its ability to load content from other origins without their explicit opt-in (via CORS headers), and in return, the page gains access to some powerful APIs, such as SharedArrayBuffer.

if (crossOriginIsolated) {   // post SharedArrayBuffer } else {   // do something else }

The White House recommits to accessibility

The new WhiteHouse.gov website of the Biden administration was built from scratch in just six weeks with accessibility as a top priority (“accessibility was top of mind”). Microsoft’s chief accessibility officer reviewed the site and gave it the thumbs up.

The website’s accessibility statement (linked from the site’s footer) declares a “commitment to accessibility” and directly references the latest version of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, WCAG 2.1 (2018). This is notable because federal agencies in the USA are only required to comply with WCAG 2.0 (2008).

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines are the most widely accepted standards for internet accessibility. … By referencing WCAG 2.1 (the latest version of the guidelines), the Biden administration may be indicating a broader acceptance of the WCAG model.

The CSS 100vw value can cause a useless horizontal scrollbar

On Windows, when a web page has a vertical scrollbar, that scrollbar consumes space and reduces the width of the page’s <html> element; this is called a classic scrollbar. The same is not the case on macOS, which uses overlay scrollbars instead of classic scrollbars; a vertical overlay scrollbar does not affect the width of the <html> element.

macOS users can switch from overlay scrollbars to classic scrollbars by setting “Show scroll bars” to ”Always” in System preferences > General.

The CSS length value 100vw is equal to the width of the <html> element. However, if a classic vertical scrollbar is added to the page, the <html> element becomes narrower (as explained above), but 100vw stays the same. In other words, 100vw is wider than the page when a classic vertical scrollbar is present.

This can be a problem for web developers on macOS who use 100vw but are unaware of its peculiarity. For example, a website might set width: 100vw on its article header to make it full-width, but this will cause a useless horizontal scrollbar on Windows that some of the site’s visitors may find annoying.

Screenshot of an article on a white background with a large black post title, post date and red tag links above a paragraph of black text. A scrollbar is displayed on the right with two large red arrows illustrating the page width, which is larger than the 100 viewport width unit.

Web developers on macOS can switch to classic scrollbars to make sure that overflow bugs caused by 100vw don’t slip under their radar. In the meantime, I have asked the CSS Working Group for comment.


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Weekly Platform News: WebKit autofill, Using Cursor Pointer, Delaying Autoplay Videos

In this week’s roundup, WebKit’s prefixed autofill becomes a standard, the pointer cursor is for more than just links, and browsers are jumping on board to delay videos set to autoplay until they’re in view… plus more! Let’s jump right into it.

CSS ::-webkit-autofill has become a standard feature

Chrome, Safari, and pretty much every other modern web browser except Firefox (more on that later) have supported the CSS :-webkit-autofill pseudo-class for many years. This selector matches form fields that have been autofilled by the browser. Websites can use this feature to style autofilled fields in CSS (with some limitations) and detect such fields in JavaScript.

let autofilled = document.querySelectorAll(":-webkit-autofill");

There currently does not exist a standard autocomplete or autofill event that would fire when the browser autofills a form field, but you can listen to the input event on the web form and then check if any of its fields match the :-webkit-autofill selector.

The HTML Standard has now standardized this feature by adding :autofill (and :-webkit-autofill as an alias) to the list of pseudo-classes that match HTML elements. This pseudo-class will also be added to the CSS Selectors module.

The :autofill and :-webkit-autofill pseudo-classes must match <input> elements that have been autofilled by the user agent. These pseudo-classes must stop matching if the user edits the autofilled field.

Following standardization, both pseudo-classes have been implemented in Firefox and are expected to ship in Firefox 86 later this month.

In the article “Let’s Bring Spacer GIFs Back!” Josh W. Comeau argues for using a “spacer” <span> element instead of a simple CSS margin to define the spacing between the icon and text of a button component.

In our home-button example, should the margin go on the back-arrow, or the text? It doesn’t feel to me like either element should “own” the space. It’s a distinct layout concern.

CSS Grid is an alternative to such spacer elements. For example, the “Link to issue” link in CSS-Tricks’s newsletter section contains two non-breaking spaces (&nbsp;) to increase the spacing between the emoji character and text, but the link could instead be turned into a simple grid layout to gain finer control over the spacing via the gap property.

The CSS Basic User Interface module defines the CSS cursor property, which allows websites to change the type of cursor that is displayed when the user hovers specific elements. The specification has the following to say about the property’s pointer value:

The cursor is a pointer that indicates a link. … User agents must apply cursor: pointer to hyperlinks. … Authors should use pointer on links and may use on other interactive elements.

Accordingly, browsers display the pointer cursor (rendered as a hand) on links and the default cursor (rendered as an arrow) on buttons. However, most websites (including Wikipedia) don’t agree with this default style and apply cursor: pointer to other interactive elements, such as buttons and checkboxes, as well.

Another interactive element for which it makes sense to use the pointer cursor is the <summary> element (the “toggle button” for opening and closing the parent <details> element).

Browsers delay autoplay until the video comes into view

Compared to modern video formats, animated GIF images are up to “twice as expensive in energy use.” For that reason, browsers have relaxed their video autoplay policies (some time ago) to encourage websites to switch from GIFs to silent or muted videos.

<!-- a basic re-implementation of a GIF using <video> --> <video autoplay loop muted playsinline src="meme.mp4"></video>

If you’re using <video muted autoplay>, don’t worry about pausing such videos when they’re no longer visible in the viewport (e.g., using an Intersection Observer). All major browsers (except Firefox) already perform this optimization by default:

<video autoplay> elements will only begin playing when visible on-screen such as when they are scrolled into the viewport, made visible through CSS, and inserted into the DOM.

(via Zach Leatherman)

Chrome introduces three new @font-face descriptors

Different browsers and operating systems sometimes use different font metrics even when rendering the same font. These differences affect the vertical position of text, which is especially noticeable on large headings.

Similarly, the different font metrics of a web font and its fallback font can cause a layout shift when the fonts are swapped during page load.

To help websites avoid layout shift and create interoperable text layouts, Chrome recently added the following three new CSS @font-face descriptors for overriding the font’s default metrics:

  • ascent-override (ascent is the height above the baseline)
  • descent-override (descent is the depth below the baseline)
  • line-gap-override
@font-face {   font-family: Roboto;   /* Merriweather Sans has 125.875px ascent     * and 35px descent at 128px font size.    */   ascent-override: calc(125.875 / 128 * 100%);   descent-override: calc(35 / 128 * 100%);   src: local(Roboto-Regular); }

The following video shows how overriding the ascent and descent metrics of the fallback font (Roboto) to match the same metrics of the web font (Merriweather Sans) can avoid layout shift when swapping between these two fonts.


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Weekly Platform News: The :not() pseudo-class, Video Media Queries, clip-path: path() Support

Hey, we’re back with weekly updates about the browser landscape from Šime Vidas.

In this week’s update, the CSS :not pseudo class can accept complex selectors, how to disable smooth scrolling when using “Find on page…” in Chrome, Safari’s support for there media attribute on <video> elements, and the long-awaited debut of the path() function for the CSS clip-path property.

Let’s jump into the news…

The enhanced :not() pseudo-class enables new kinds of powerful selectors

After a years-long wait, the enhanced :not() pseudo-class has finally shipped in Chrome and Firefox, and is now supported in all major browser engines. This new version of :not() accepts complex selectors and even entire selector lists.

For example, you can now select all <p> elements that are not contained within an <article> element.

/* select all <p>s that are descendants of <article> */ article p { }  /* NEW! */ /* select all <p>s that are not descendants of <article> */ p:not(article *) { }

In another example, you may want to select the first list item that does not have the hidden attribute (or any other attribute, for that matter). The best selector for this task would be :nth-child(1 of :not([hidden])), but the of notation is still only supported in Safari. Luckily, this unsupported selector can now be re-written using only the enhanced :not() pseudo-class.

/* select all non-hidden elements that are not preceded by a non-hidden sibling (i.e., select the first non-hidden child */ :not([hidden]):not(:not([hidden]) ~ :not([hidden])) { }

The HTTP Refresh header can be an accessibility issue

The HTTP Refresh header (and equivalent HTML <meta> tag) is a very old and widely supported non-standard feature that instructs the browser to automatically and periodically reload the page after a given amount of time.

<!-- refresh page after 60 seconds --> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="60">

According to Google’s data, the <meta http-equiv="refresh"> tag is used by a whopping 2.8% of page loads in Chrome (down from 4% a year ago). All these websites risk failing several success criteria of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG):

If the time interval is too short, and there is no way to turn auto-refresh off, people who are blind will not have enough time to make their screen readers read the page before the page refreshes unexpectedly and causes the screen reader to begin reading at the top.

However, WCAG does allow using the <meta http-equiv="refresh"> tag specifically with the value 0 to perform a client-side redirect in the case that the author does not control the server and hence cannot perform a proper HTTP redirect.

(via Stefan Judis)

How to disable smooth scrolling for the “Find on page…” feature in Chrome

CSS scroll-behavior: smooth is supported in Chrome and Firefox. When this declaration is set on the <html> element, the browser scrolls the page “in a smooth fashion.” This applies to navigations, the standard scrolling APIs (e.g., window.scrollTo({ top: 0 })), and scroll snapping operations (CSS Scroll Snap).

Unfortunately, Chrome erroneously keeps smooth scrolling enabled even when the user performs a text search on the page (“Find on page…” feature). Some people find this annoying. Until that is fixed, you can use Christian Schaefer’s clever CSS workaround that effectively disables smooth scrolling for the “Find on page…” feature only.

@keyframes smoothscroll1 {   from,   to {     scroll-behavior: smooth;   } }  @keyframes smoothscroll2 {   from,   to {     scroll-behavior: smooth;   } }  html {   animation: smoothscroll1 1s; }  html:focus-within {   animation-name: smoothscroll2;   scroll-behavior: smooth; }

In the following demo, notice how clicking the links scrolls the page smoothly while searching for the words “top” and “bottom” scrolls the page instantly.

Safari still supports the media attribute on video sources

With the HTML <video> element, it is possible to declare multiple video sources of different MIME types and encodings. This allows websites to use more modern and efficient video formats in supporting browsers, while providing a fallback for other browsers.

<video>   <source src="/flower.webm" type="video/webm">   <source src="/flower.mp4" type="video/mp4"> </video>

In the past, browsers also supported the media attribute on video sources. For example, a web page could load a higher-resolution video if the user’s viewport exceeded a certain size.

<video>   <source media="(min-width: 1200px)" src="/large.mp4" type="video/mp4">   <source src="/small.mp4" type="video/mp4"> </video>

The above syntax is in fact still supported in Safari today, but it was removed from other browsers around 2014 because it was not considered a good feature:

It is not appropriate for choosing between low resolution and high resolution because the environment can change (e.g., the user might fullscreen the video after it has begun loading and want high resolution). Also, bandwidth is not available in media queries, but even if it was, the user agent is in a better position to determine what is appropriate than the author.

Scott Jehl (Filament Group) argues that the removal of this feature was a mistake and that websites should be able to deliver responsive video sources using <video> alone.

For every video we embed in HTML, we’re stuck with the choice of serving source files that are potentially too large or small for many users’ devices … or resorting to more complicated server-side or scripted or third-party solutions to deliver a correct size.

Scott has written a proposal for the reintroduction of media in video <source> elements and is welcoming feedback.

The CSS clip-path: path() function ships in Chrome

It wasn’t mentioned in the latest “New in Chrome 88” article, but Chrome just shipped the path() function for the CSS clip-path property, which means that this feature is now supported in all three major browser engines (Safari, Firefox, and Chrome).

The path() function is defined in the CSS Shapes module, and it accepts an SVG path string. Chris calls this the ultimate syntax for the clip-path property because it can clip an element with “literally any shape.” For example, here’s a photo clipped with a heart shape:


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Weekly Platform News: Strict Tracking Protection, Dark Web Pages, Periodic Background Sync

In this week’s news: Firefox gets strict, Opera goes to the dark side, and Chrome plans to let web apps run in the background.

Let’s get into the news.

Firefox for Android will block tracking content

Mozilla has announced that the upcoming revamped Firefox for Android (currently available in a test version under the name “Firefox Preview”) will include strict tracking protection by default.

On the phone or tablet, most users care much more about performance and blocking of annoyances compared to desktop. Users are more forgiving when a site doesn’t load exactly like it’s meant to. So we decided that while Firefox for desktop’s default mode is “Standard,” Firefox Preview will use “Strict” mode.

Strict tracking protection additionally blocks “tracking content”: ads, videos, and other content with tracking code.

(via Mozilla)

Opera adds option that renders all websites in dark mode

Opera for Android has added a “Dark web pages” option that renders all websites in dark mode. If a website does not provide dark mode styles (via the CSS prefers-color-scheme media feature), Opera applies its own “clever CSS changes” to render the site in dark mode regardless.

(via Stefan Stjernelund)

Periodic Background Sync is coming to Chrome

Google intends to ship Periodic Background Sync in the next version of Chrome (early next year). This feature will enable installed web apps to run background tasks at periodic intervals with network connectivity.

Chrome’s implementation restricts the API to installed web apps. Chrome grants the permission on behalf of the user for any installed web app. The API is not available outside of installed PWAs.

Apple and Mozilla are currently opposed to this API. At Mozilla, there are opinions that the feature is “harmful in its current state,” while Apple states multiple privacy and security risks.

(via Mugdha Lakhani)

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Weekly Platform News: Upgrading Navigations to HTTPS, Sale of .org Domains, New Browser Engine

In this week’s roundup: DuckDuckGo gets smarter encryption, a fight over the sale of dot org domains, and a new browser engine is in the works.

Let’s get into the news!

DuckDuckGo upgrades and open-sources its encryption

DuckDuckGo has open-sourced its “Smarter Encryption” technology that enables upgrading from HTTP to HTTPS, and Pinterest (a popular social network) is already using it for outbound traffic — when people navigate from Pinterest to other websites — with great results: Their outbound HTTPS traffic increased from 60% to 80%.

DuckDuckGo uses its crawler to automatically generate and maintain a huge list of websites that support HTTPS, approximately 12 million entries. For comparison, Chromium’s HSTS Preload List contains only about 85 thousand entries.

(via DuckDuckGo)

Nonprofits oppose the sale of the .org domain

A coalition of organizations consisting of EFF, Wikimedia, and many others, are urging the Internet Society to stop the sale of the nonprofit organization that operates the .org domain to an investment firm.

Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) all over the world rely on the .org top-level domain. […] We cannot afford to put them into the hands of a private equity firm that has not earned the trust of the NGO community.

In a separate blog post, Mark Surman (CEO of Mozilla Foundation) urges the Internet Society to “step back and provide public answers to questions of interest to the public and the millions of organizations that have made dot org their home online for the last 15 years.”

(via Elliot Harmon)

A new browser engine is in development

Ekioh (a company from Cambridge, U.K.) is developing an entirely new browser engine for their Flow browser, which also includes Mozilla’s SpiderMonkey as its JavaScript engine. The browser can already run web apps such as Gmail (mostly), and the company plans to release it on desktop soon.

(via Flow Browser)

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Weekly Platform News: Contrast Ratio Range, replaceAll Method, Native File System API

In this week’s roundup: Firefox’s new contrast checker, a simpler way to lasso substrings in a string, and a new experimental API that will let apps fiddle with a user’s local files.

Firefox shows the contrast ratio range for text on a multicolored background

According to Success Criterion 1.4.3 of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), text should have a contrast ratio of at least 4.5. (A lower contrast ratio is acceptable only if the text is 24px or larger.)

If the background of the text is not a solid color but a color gradient or photograph, you can use the special element picker in Firefox’s Accessibility panel to get a range of contrast ratios based on the element’s actual background.

(via Šime Vidas)

Replacing all instances of a substring in a string

The new JavaScript replaceAll method makes it easier to replace all instances of a substring in a string without having to convert the substring to a regex first, which is “hard to get right since JavaScript doesn’t offer a built-in mechanism to escape regular expression patterns.”

// BEFORE str = str.replace(/foo/g, "bar");  // AFTER str = str.replaceAll("foo", "bar");

This new string method has not yet shipped in browsers, but you can start using it today via Babel (since it’s automatically polyfilled by @babel/preset-env).

(via Mathias Bynens)

Try out the Native File System API in Chrome

The Native File System API, which is experimentally supported in Chrome, allows web apps to read or save changes directly to local files on the person’s computer. The app is granted permission to view and edit files in a specific folder via two separate prompts.

You can try out this new feature by visiting labs.vaadin.com in Chrome on desktop.

(via Thomas Steiner)

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Weekly Platform News: Internet Explorer Mode, Speed Report in Search Console, Restricting Notification Prompts

In this week’s roundup: Internet Explorer finds its way into Edge, Google Search Console touts a new speed report, and Firefox gives Facebook’s notification the silent treatment.

Let’s get into the news!

Edge browser with new Internet Explorer mode launches in January

Microsoft expects to release the new Chromium-based Edge browser on January 15, on both Windows and macOS. This browser includes a new Internet Explorer mode that allows Edge to automatically and seamlessly render tabs containing specific legacy content (e.g., a company’s intranet) using Internet Explorer’s engine instead of Edge’s standard engine (Blink).

Here’s a sped-up excerpt from Fred Pullen’s presentation that shows the new Internet Explorer mode in action:

(via Kyle Pflug)

Speed report experimentally available in Google Search Console

The new Speed report in Google’s Search Console shows how your website performs for real-world Chrome users (both on mobile and desktop). Pages that “pass a certain threshold of visits” are categorized into fast, moderate, and slow pages.

Tip: After fixing a speed issue, use the “Validate fix” button to notify Google Search. Google will verify the fix and re-index the pages if the issue is resolved.

(via Google Webmasters)

Facebook’s notification prompt will disappear in Firefox

Firefox will soon start blocking notification prompts on websites that request the notification permission immediately on page load (Facebook does this). Instead of the prompt, a small “speech balloon” icon will be shown in the URL bar.

Websites will still be able to show a notification prompt in Firefox as long as they request permission in response to a user interaction (a click, tap, or key press).

(via Marcos Càceres)

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Weekly Platform News: Web Apps in Galaxy Store, Tappable Stories, CSS Subgrid

In this week’s roundup: Firefox gains locksmith-like powers, Samsung’s Galaxy Store starts supporting Progressive Web Apps, CSS Subgrid is shipping in Firefox 70, and a new study confirms that users prefer to tap into content rather than scroll through it.

Let’s get into the news.

Securely generated passwords in Firefox

Firefox now suggests a securely generated password when the user focuses an <input> element that has the autocomplete="new-password" attribute value. This option is also available via the context menu on any password field.


(via The Firefox Frontier)

Web apps in Samsung’s app store

Samsung has started adding Progressive Web Apps (PWA) to its app store, Samsung Galaxy Store, which is available on Samsung devices. The new “Web apps” category is visible initially only in the United States. If you own a PWA, you can send its URL to pwasupport@samsung.com, and Samsung will help you get onboarded into Galaxy Store.

(via Ada Rose Cannon)

Tappable stories on the mobile web

According to a study commissioned by Google, the majority of people prefer tappable stories over scrolling articles when consuming content on the mobile web. Google is using this study to promote AMP Stories, which is a format for tappable stories on the mobile web.

Both studies had participants interact with real-world examples of tappable stories on the mobile web as well as scrolling article equivalents. Forrester found that 64% of respondents preferred the tappable mobile web story format over its scrolling article equivalent.

(via Alex Durán)

The grid form use-case for CSS Subgrid

CSS Subgrid is shipping in Firefox next month. This new feature enables grid items of nested grids to be put onto the outer grid, which is useful in situations where the wanted grid items are not direct children of the grid container.

(via Šime Vidas)

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Using the Platform

Tim Kadlec:

So much care and planning has gone into creating the web platform, to ensure that even as new features are added, they’re added in a way that doesn’t break the web for anyone using an older device or browser. Can you say the same for any framework out there? I don’t mean that to be perceived as throwing shade (as the kids say). Building the actual web platform requires a deeper level of commitment to these sorts of things out of necessity.

The platform (meaning using standard features built into browsers) might not have everything you need (it often won’t) and using those features will bring long-term resiliency to what you build in a way that a framework may not. The web evolves and very likely won’t break things. Frameworks evolve and very likely will break things.

Sorta evokes the story of MooTools and Smooshgate.

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Weekly Platform News: WebAPK Limited to Chrome, Discernible Focus Rectangles, Modal Window API

In this week’s roundup: “Add to home screen” has different meanings in Android, Chrome and Edge add some pop to focus rectangles on form inputs, and how third-party sites may be coming to a modal near you.

Let’s get into the news.

WebAPKs are not available to Firefox on Android

On Android, both Chrome and Firefox have an “Add to home screen” option, but while Firefox merely adds a shortcut for the web app to the user’s home screen, Chrome actually installs the web app (as long as it meets the PWA install criteria) via a WebAPK.

Progressive Web Apps installed in such a way are added to the device’s app drawer, and URLs that are within the PWA’s scope (as specified in its manifest) open in the PWA instead of the default browser.

Tiger Oakes who is implementing PWA-related features at Mozilla, explains why Firefox cannot install PWAs on Android: “WebAPK is not available to us since we don’t own an app store like Google Play and Galaxy Apps.”

(via Tiger Oakes)

More accessible focus rectangles are coming to Chrome and Edge

Microsoft and Google have made accessibility improvements to various form controls. The two main changes are the larger touch targets on the time and date inputs, and the redesigned focus rectangles that are now easily discernible on any background.

The updated form controls are available in the preview version of Edge. Mac users may have to manually enable the “Web Platform Fluent Controls” flag on the about:flags page.

(via Microsoft Edge Dev)

A newly proposed API for loading third-parties in modal windows

The proposed Modal Window API would allow a website to load another website in a modal window (in a top-level browsing context) for the purposes of authentication, payments, sharing, access to third-party services, etc.

Only a single modal window would be allowed at a time, and the two websites could communicate with each other via message events (postMessage method).

This API is intended as a better alternative to existing methods, such as pop-ups, which can be confusing to users and blocked by browsers, and redirects, which cause the original context to be torn down and recreated (or completely lost in the case of an error in the third-party service).

(via Adrian Hope-Bailie)

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