Tag: People

More People Dipping Toes Into Web Monetization

Léonie Watson:

I do think that Coil and Web Monetization are at the vanguard of a quiet revolution.

Here’s me when I’m visiting Léonie’s site:

Browser Extension opened saying "Coil is Paying".
Enjoy the pennies!

My Coil subscription ($ 5/month) doles out money to sites I visit that have monetization set up and installed.

Other Coil subscribers deposit small bits of money directly into my online wallet (I’m using Uphold). I set this up over a year ago and found it all quick and easy to get started. But to be fair, I wasn’t trying to understand every detail of it and I’m still not betting anything major on it. PPK went as far to say it was user-hostile and I’ll admit he has some good points…

Signing up for payment services is a complete hassle, because you don’t know what you’re doing while being granted the illusion of free choice by picking one of two or three different systems — that you don’t understand and that aren’t explained. Why would I pick EasyMoneyGetter over CoinWare when both of them are black boxes I never heard of?

Also, these services use insane units. Brave use BATs, though to their credit I saw a translation to US$ — but not to any other currency, even though they could have figured out from my IP address that I come from Europe. Coil once informed me I had earned 0.42 XBP without further comment. W? T? F?

Bigger and bigger sites are starting to use it. TechDirt, is one example. I’ve got it on CodePen as well.

If this was just a “sprinkle some pennies at sites” play, it would be doomed.

I’m pessimistic at that approach. Micropayments have been done over and over and it hasn’t worked and I just don’t see it ever having enough legs to do anything meaningful to the industry.

At a quick glance, that’s what this looks like, and that’s how it is behaving right now, and that deserves a little skepticism.

There are two things that make this different

  1. This has a chance of being a web standard, not something that has to be installed to work.
  2. There are APIs to actually do things based on people transferring money to a site.

Neither of these things are realized, but if both of them happen, then meaningful change is much more likely to happen.

With the APIs, a site could say, “You’ll see no ads on this site if you pay us $ 1/month,” and then write code to make that happen all anonymously. That’s so cool. Removing ads is the most basic and obvious use case, and I hope some people give that a healthy try. I don’t do that on this site, because I think the tech isn’t quite there yet. I’d want to clearly be able to control the dollar-level of when you get that perk (you can’t control how much you give sites on Coil right now), but more importantly, in order to really make good on the promise of not delivering ads, you need to know very quickly if any given user is supporting you at the required level or not. For example, you can’t wait 2600 milliseconds to decide whether ads need to be requested. Well, you can, but you’ll hurt your ad revenue. And you can’t simply request the ads and hide them when you find out, lest you are not really making good on a promise, as trackers’n’stuff will have already done their thing.

Coil said the right move here is the “100+20” Rule, which I think is smart. It says to give everyone the full value of your site, but then give people extra if they hit monetization thresholds. For example, on this site, if you’re a supporter (not a Coil thing, this is old-school eCommerce), you can download the screencast originals (nobody else can). That’s the kind of thing I’d be happy to unlock via Web Monetization if it became easy to write the code to do that.

Maybe the web really will get monetized at some point and thus fix the original sin of the internet. I’m not really up on where things are in the process, but there is a whole site for it.

I’m not really helping, yet

While I have Coil installed and I’m a fan of all this, what will actually make a difference is having sites that actually do things for users that pay them. Like my video download example above. Maybe recipe sites offer some neat little printable PDF shopping list for people that pay them via Web Monetization. I dunno! Stuff like that! I’m not doing anything cool like that yet, myself.

If this thing gets legs, we’ll see all sorts of creative stuff, and the standard will make it so there is no one service that lords over this. It will be standardized APIs, so there could be a whole ecosystem of online wallets that accept money, services that help dole money out, fancy in-browser features, and site owners doing creative things.


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People Problems

Just the other day, Jeremy Keith wrote that problems with performance work isn’t only a matter of optimization and fixing code, but also tackling people problems:

It struck me that there’s a continuum of performance challenges. On one end of the continuum, you’ve got technical issues. These can be solved with technical solutions. On the other end of the continuum, you’ve got human issues. These can be solved with discussions, agreement, empathy, and conversations (often dreaded or awkward).

I think that, as developers, we tend to gravitate towards the technical issues. That’s our safe space. But I suspect that bigger gains can be reaped by tackling the uncomfortable human issues.

This was definitely shocking to learn when I joined a company a few years ago and found that there was a mountain of performance work that I couldn’t do alone. I started trying to teach folks about performance, as well as holding office hours and hopping onto projects and teams that needed help. But I realized that all this work didn’t help. The website I was working on in my spare time was getting slower, despite my best efforts.

Frustrated and exhausted, one day I sat back in my chair and realized that I couldn’t do all this work alone. The real problem was this: there’s no incentive for folks to care. If performance magically improved by ten thousand percent, no one in the company would have noticed. Customers would have noticed, but we all probably wouldn’t have. Except me, because I’m a nerd.

In Ethan Marcotte’s latest talk, he describes this people problem when it comes to design systems:

Creating modular components isn’t the primary goal or even the primary benefit of creating a design system. And what’s more, a focus on process and people always leads to more sustainable systems.

Design systems are about good, quality front-end code just like performance is, too. But if people within an organization are not incentivized to use the components within a library or talk to the design systems team, then that’s where things quickly get bonkers.

I’d maybe simplify this people problem a bit: the codebase is easy to change, but the incentives within a company are not. And yet it’s the incentives that drive what kind of code gets written — what is acceptable, what needs to get fixed, how people work together. In short, we cannot be expected to fix the code without fixing the organization, too.

The most obvious incentives are money and performance ratings, or even hiring a person or team dedicated to this particular line of work. Improving visibility into performance problems and celebrating big wins is another thing that can be done to shift the balance and make folks care more about this whole new area of expertise. But these things really have to come from the top down; not from the the bottom up. At least that’s been true in my experience.

My point here is that there’s no single solution to fix the incentive problem in large organizations. It sounds silly, but in order to make that website, the biggest hurdles to overcome are those incentives. If no one cares about performance work today, then shouting and screaming and being a jerk about it won’t help at all.

Trust me, I have been that jerk.


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People Digging into Grid Sizing and Layout Possibilities

Jen Simmons has been coining the term intrinsic design, referring to a new era in web layout where the sizing of content has gone beyond fluid columns and media query breakpoints and into, I dunno, something a bit more exotic. For example, columns that are sized more by content and guidelines than percentages. And not always columns, but more like appropriate placement, however that needs to be done.

One thing is for sure, people are playing with the possibilities a lot right now. In the span of 10 days I’ve gathered these links:

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People Talkin’ Shapes

Codrops has a very nice article on CSS Shapes from Tania Rascia. You might know shape-outside is for redefining the area by which text is floated around that element, allowing for some interesting design opportunities. But there are a couple of genuine CSS tricks in here:

  1. Float shape-outside elements both right and left to get text to flow between them.
  2. You can set shape-outside to take an image and use shape-image-threshold to adjust where the text flows, meaning you could even use a gradient!


Shapes are in the water recently, as Heydon Pickering recently published a short video on using them. He also covers things like clip-path and canvas and such:


We recently moved our long-time page on (basically faking) CSS shapes over to a blog post so it’s easier to maintain.

Robin also wrote Working with Shapes in Web Design that digs into all this. So many tricks!

See the Pen 10c03204463e92a72a6756678e6348d1 by CSS-Tricks (@css-tricks) on CodePen.


When we talk about CSS shapes, it’s almost like we’re talking about values moreso than properties. What I mean is that the value functions like polygon(), circle(), ellipse(), offset(), path(), etc. are more representative of “CSS shapes” than the properties they are applied to. Multiple properties take them, like shape-outside, clip-path, and offset-path.

I once did a whole talk on this:

The only thing that’s changed since then is that Firefox started allowing clip-path: path() behind the flag layout.css.clip-path-path.enabled (demo).


And don’t forget Jen Simmons was talking about the possibilities of CSS Shapes (in her lab demos) years earlier!

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