Tag: Multiple

Radio Buttons Are Like Selects; Checkboxes Are Like Multiple Selects

I was reading Anna Kaley’s “Listboxes vs. Dropdown Lists” post the other day. It’s a fairly straightforward comparison between different UI implementations of selecting options. There is lots of good advice there. Classics like that you should use radio buttons (single select) or checkboxes (multiple select) if you’re showing five or fewer options, and the different options when the number of options grows from there.

One thing that isn’t talked about is how you implement these things. I imagine that’s somewhat on purpose as the point is to talk UX, not tech. But how you implement them plays a huge part in UX. In web design and development circles, the conversation about these things usually involves whether you can pull these things off with native controls, or if you need to rebuild them from scratch. If you can use native controls, you often should, because there are tons of UX that you get for free that that might otherwise be lost or forgotten when you rebuild — like how everything works via the keyboard.

The reason people chose “rebuild” is often for styling reasons, but that’s changing slowly over time. We’ve got lots of control over radios and checkboxes now. We can style the outside of selects pretty well and even the inside with trickery.

But even without custom styling, we still have some UI options. If you need to select one option from many, we’ve got <input type="radio"> buttons, but data and end-result-wise, that’s the same as a <select>. If you need to select multiple options, we’ve got <input type="checkbox">, but that’s data and end-result-wise the same as <select multiple>.

You pick based on the room you have available and the UX of whatever you’re building.

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CSS :not() with Multiple Classes

Say you want to select an element when it doesn’t have a certain class. That’s what the :not() selector is for.

body:not(.home) {    }

But what if there are multiple classes you want to avoid?

There are no logical combinators with :not(), like and or or, but you can chain them, which is effectively like and.

body:not(.home):not(.away):not(.page-50) {    }

The :not() selector doesn’t add any specificy by itself, but what is inside does, so :not(.foo) adds the same weight as .foo does.

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Managing Multiple Backgrounds with Custom Properties

One cool thing about CSS custom properties is that they can be a part of a value. Let’s say you’re using multiple backgrounds to pull off a a design. Each background will have its own color, image, repeat, position, etc. It can be verbose!

You have four images:

body {      background-position:     top 10px left 10px,     top 10px right 10px,     bottom 10px right 10px,     bottom 10px left 10px;      background-repeat: no-repeat;      background-image:     url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-left.svg),     url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-right.svg),     url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-right.svg),     url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-left.svg);    }

You want to add a fifth in a media query:

@media (min-width: 1500px) {   body {     /* REPEAT all existing backgrounds, then add a fifth. */   } }

That’s going to be super verbose! You’ll have to repeat each of those four images again, then add the fifth. Lots of duplication there.

One possibility is to create a variable for the base set, then add the fifth much more cleanly:

body {   --baseBackgrounds:      url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-left.svg),     url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-right.svg),     url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-right.svg),     url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-left.svg);    background-position:     top 10px left 10px,     top 10px right 10px,     bottom 10px right 10px,     bottom 10px left 10px;      background-repeat: no-repeat;      background-image: var(--baseBackgrounds); } @media (min-width: 1500px) {   body {     background-image:        var(--baseBackgrounds),       url(added-fifth-background.svg);   } }

But, it’s really up to you. It might make more sense and be easier manage if you made each background image into a variable, and then pieced them together as needed.

body {   --bg1: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-left.svg);   --bg2: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-right.svg);   --bg3: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-right.svg);   --bg4: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-left.svg);   --bg5: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-left.svg);      background-image: var(--bg1), var(--bg2), var(--bg3), var(--bg4); } @media (min-width: 1500px) {   body {     background-image: var(--bg1), var(--bg2), var(--bg3), var(--bg4), var(--bg5);   } }

Here’s a basic version of that, including a supports query:

See the Pen
Multiple BGs with Custom Properties
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

Dynamically changing just the part of a value is a huge strength of CSS custom properties!

Note, too, that with backgrounds, it might be best to include the entire shorthand as the variable. That way, it’s much easier to piece everything together at once, rather than needing something like…

--bg_1_url: url(); --bg_1_size: 100px; --bg_1_repeat: no-repeat; /* etc. */

It’s easier to put all of the properties into shorthand and use as needed:

body {     --bg_1: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-left.svg) top 10px left 10px / 86px no-repeat;   --bg_2: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-top-right.svg) top 10px right 10px / 86px no-repeat;   --bg_3: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-right.svg) bottom 10px right 10px / 86px no-repeat;   --bg_4: url(https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/s.cdpn.io/3/angles-bottom-left.svg) bottom 10px left 10px  / 86px no-repeat;        background:     var(--bg_1), var(--bg_2),var(--bg_3),var(--bg_4); }

Like this.

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CSS Triangles, Multiple Ways

I like Adam Laki’s Quick Tip: CSS Triangles because it covers that ubiquitous fact about front-end techniques: there are always many ways to do the same thing. In this case, drawing a triangle can be done:

  • with border and a collapsed element
  • with clip-path: polygon()
  • with transform: rotate() and overflow: hidden
  • with glyphs like ▼

I’d say that the way I’ve typically done triangles the most over the years is with the border trick, but I think my favorite way now is using clip-path. Code like this is fairly clear, understandable, and maintainable to me: clip-path: polygon(50% 0, 0 100%, 100% 100%); Brain: Middle top! Bottom right! Bottom left! Triangle!

My 2nd Place method goes to an option that didn’t make Adam’s list: inline <svg>! This kind of thing is nearly just as brain-friendly: <polygon points="0,0 100,0 50,100"/>.

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Multiple Background Clip

You know how you can have multiple backgrounds?

body {   background-image:      url(image-one.jpg),     url(image-two.jpg); }

That’s just background-image. You can set their position too, as you might expect. We’ll shorthand it:

body {   background:      url(image-one.jpg) no-repeat top right,     url(image-two.jpg) no-repeat bottom left; }

I snuck background-repeat in there just for fun. Another one you might not think of setting for multiple different backgrounds, though, is background-clip. In this linked article, Stefan Judis notes that this unlocks some pretty legit CSS-Trickery!

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