Tag: Management

Workflow Considerations for Using an Image Management Service

There are all these sites out there that want to help you with your images. They do things like optimize your images and help you serve them performantly.

Here’s the type of service I mean.

That’s a very good thing. By any metric, images are a major slice of the resources on websites, and we’re notoriously bad at optimizing them and doing all the things we could to lower the performance hit from them. I’m sitting at a conference right now and Dave just bet everyone in the audience $ 100 that he could find an unoptimized image on their site. I wasn’t about to take him up on it.

So you use some service to help you deliver images better. Smart. Many of them will make managing and optimizing images a lot easier. But I don’t consider them a no-brainer. There is a lot to think about, like making choices that don’t paint you into a corner.

I should be able to upload images from my own CMS.

I don’t want to go to your site to upload my assets. I want to use the media management in my own CMS. So, the service should have an API at a minimum, and possible even officially maintained CMS plugins.

This site uses WordPress. I can drag and drop images into the media library and posts very easily. I can search my media library for images I’ve uploaded before. I like that, and I want to take advantage of it today, and as it evolves.

The images should be uploaded to my own server.

If it also has to be uploaded to the image service, that’s fine. But it should go to my server first, then to the service. That way, I still maintain ownership of the source file.

Images within content should use functional, semantic markup in my CMS.

I’d prefer that the images within content are stored as totally functional HTML in my database:

<img src="/images/flower.jpg" alt="a blue flower">

It could be fancier than that, like using srcset (but probably not sizes as that will change as the design changes), or be contained within <picture> or <figure> elements… whatever you like that makes sense as semantic HTML. The most important thing being that the content in my database has fully functional HTML with a src on the image that points to a real image on my real server.

The implementation of the image service will involve filtering that HTML to do whatever it needs to do, like replace the URLs to generate fancier responsive image markup and whatnot.

Between having functional HTML and images on my server, that enables me to turn off the image service if I need to. Services have a habit of coming and going, or changing in ways that make them more or less palatable. I don’t want to be locked-in; I want freedom. I want to be able turn off the service and have a perfectly functional site with perfectly functional images, and not be obstructed from moving to a different service — or no service at all.

Even if I didn’t use the service in the past, I want all my images to benefit from it.

I just mentioned filtering the HTML for images in my database. That should happen for all the images on my site, even if they were uploaded and used before I started using the image service.

This probably means the services offers a URL-based “get” API to optimize images on-the-fly pulled from their canonical locations.

I shouldn’t have to think about format or size.

I want to upload whatever I have. Probably some huge un-optimized screenshot I just took. If I think about it at all, I want to upload something much too big and much too high-quality so that I know I have a great original version available. The service will create optimized, sized, and formatted images as needed.

I also want to upload SVG and have it stay SVG (that’s also optimized).

The images will ultimately be served on a CDN.

CDNs are vital for speed. Australians get images from servers hosted in Australia. Canadians get images from servers hosted in Canada. The servers are configured to be fast and cookie-less and all the fancy over-my-head things that make an asset CDN scream.

The images should serve in the right format.

If you serve images in WebP format to browsers that support it, you’ll probably get as much or more performance out of that optimization than serving re-sized images with responsive images syntax. It’s a big deal.

I want the service to know what the best possible format for any particular image for any particular browser and serve the image in that format. This is going to change over time, so I want the service to stay on top of this so I don’t have to.

I know that involved formats like JPEG-XR and JPEG-2000 three years ago. Is that still the case? I have no idea. This is a core value proposition for the service.

It should optimize the images and handle quality.

This is perhaps the most obvious feature and the reason you reach for an image service in the first place. Images need optimization. There are perhaps dozens of image optimization tools/algorithms that aim to squeeze every last byte out of images. The image service probably uses those or even has its own fancy tech for it. Ideally, the default is to optimize an image the most it possibly can be without noticeably hurting the quality, but still allowing me to ratchet it down even more if I want to.

Don’t shame me for using high-pixel density images.

A lot of image services have some sort of tester tool where you drop in a URL and it tells you how bad you’re doing with images. Many of them test the size of the image on the rendered page and compare the dimensions of the original image. If the original image is larger, they tell you could have had savings by sizing it down. That’s obnoxious to me. High-pixel density displays have been around for a long time and it’s no crime to serve them.

It should help me serve the right size for the device it’s on and the perfect responsive syntax if needed.

Not all images benefit from the same responsive breakpoints. Check out the site Responsive Image Breakpoints. It generates versions of the image that are best depending on the image itself. That’s the kind of help I like to see from an image service. Take something hard and automate it for me.

I know I’ll probably need to bring my own sizes attribute because that is very dependant on my own CSS and how the design of the site plays out. It’s still important, and makes me wonder if an image service could step up and help me figure out what my optimal sizes attribute should be for certain images. Like loading my site at different sizes and seeing how large the image renders with my CSS and calculating it from there to use later.

Just me.

This is just my own list of requirements. I feel like it’s fairly reflective of “normal” sites that have a bunch of images and want to do the right thing to serve them.

I didn’t go into all the fancy features image services offer, like being able to tell you that an image contains a giraffe facing west and hasn’t eaten since Thursday while offering to recolor its retinas. I know those things are vital to some companies. This is more about what seems to me the widest and most common use case of just hosting and delivering images in the best way current technology allows.

The post Workflow Considerations for Using an Image Management Service appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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Using Immer for React State Management

We make use of state to keep track of application data. States change as users interact with an application. When this happens, we need to update the state that is displayed to the user, and we do this using React’s setState.

Since states are not meant to be updated directly (because React’s state has to be immutable), things can get really complicated as states become more complex. They become difficult to understand and follow.

This is where Immer comes in and that’s what we’re going to look at in this post. Using Immer, states can be simplified and much easier to follow. Immer makes use of something called “draft” which you can think of as the copy of your state, but not the state itself. It’s as though Immer hit CMD+C on the state and then cmd+V’d it somewhere else where it can be safely viewed without disturbing the original copy. Any updates you need to make happen on the draft, and the parts of the current state that change on the draft is updated.

Let’s say your application’s state looks like this;

this.state = {   name: 'Kunle',   age: 30,   city: 'Lagos,   country: 'Nigeria' }

This user happens to be celebrating his 31st birthday and which means we need to update the age value. With Immer running behind the scenes, a replica of this state will be made.

Now imagine the replica is made and handed over to a messenger, who gives the newly copied version of the state to Kunle. It means there are now two copies available — the current state and the draft copy that was handed over. Kunle then changes the age on the draft to 31. The messenger then returns to the application with the draft, compares both versions, and only updates the age since that’s the only part of the draft that changed.

It does not break the idea of an immutable state, as the current state does not get updated directly. Immer basically makes it convenient to work with immutable state.

Let’s look at an example of this at work

Say you want to build a traffic light for your community, you can give it a shot using Immer for your state updates.

See the Pen
Traffic Light Example with Reactjs
by CarterTsai (@CarterTsai)
on CodePen.

Using Immer, the component will look like this:

const {produce} = immer  class App extends React.Component {   state = {     red: 'red',      yellow: 'black',      green: 'black',     next: "yellow"   }    componentDidMount() {     this.interval = setInterval(() => this.changeHandle(), 3000);   }      componentWillUnmount()  {     clearInterval(this.interval);   }    handleRedLight = () => {     this.setState(       produce(draft => {         draft.red = 'red';         draft.yellow = 'black';         draft.green = 'black';         draft.next = 'yellow'       })     )   }      handleYellowLight = () => {     this.setState(       produce(draft => {         draft.red = 'black';         draft.yellow = 'yellow';         draft.green = 'black';         draft.next = 'green'       })     )   }      handleGreenLight = () => {     this.setState(       produce(draft => {         draft.red = 'black';         draft.yellow = 'black';         draft.green = 'green';         draft.next = 'red'       })     )   }    changeHandle = () => {     if (this.state.next === 'yellow') {       this.handleYellowLight()     } else if (this.state.next === 'green') {       this.handleGreenLight()     } else {       this.handleRedLight()     }        }    render() {     return (       <div className="box">         <div className="circle" style={{backgroundColor: this.state.red}}></div>         <div className="circle" style={{backgroundColor: this.state.yellow}}></div>         <div className="circle" style={{backgroundColor: this.state.green}}></div>       </div>   ); } };

produce is the default function we get from Immer. Here, we pass it as a value to the setState() method. The produce function takes a function which accepts draft as an argument. It is inside this function that we can then set the draft copy with which we want to update our state.

If that looks complicated, there is another way to write this. First, we create a function.

const handleLight = (state) => {   return produce(state, (draft) => {     draft.red = 'black';     draft.yellow = 'black';     draft.green = 'green';     draft.next = 'red'   }); }

We are passing the current state of the application, and the function which accepts draft as arguments to the produce function. To make use of this inside our component, we do this;

handleGreenLight = () => {   const nextState = handleLight(this.state)   this.setState(nextState) }

Another example: A shopping list

If you have been working with React for a while now, then you’re not a stranger to the spread operator. With Immer, you need not make use of the spread operator, especially when working with an array in your state.

Let’s explore that a little further by creating a shopping list application.

See the Pen
immer 2 – shopping list
by Kingsley Silas Chijioke (@kinsomicrote)
on CodePen.

Here’s the component we’re working with:

class App extends React.Component {   constructor(props) {       super(props)              this.state = {         item: "",         price: 0,         list: [           { id: 1, name: "Cereals", price: 12 },           { id: 2, name: "Rice", price: 10 }         ]       }     }      handleInputChange = e => {       this.setState(       produce(draft => {         draft[event.target.name] = event.target.value       }))     }      handleSubmit = (e) => {       e.preventDefault()       const newItem = {         id: uuid.v4(),         name: this.state.name,         price: this.state.price       }       this.setState(         produce(draft => {           draft.list = draft.list.concat(newItem)         })       )     };    render() {     return (       <React.Fragment>         <section className="section">           <div className="box">             <form onSubmit={this.handleSubmit}>               <h2>Create your shopping list</h2>               <div>                 <input                   type="text"                   placeholder="Item's Name"                   onChange={this.handleInputChange}                   name="name"                   className="input"                   />               </div>               <div>                 <input                   type="number"                   placeholder="Item's Price"                   onChange={this.handleInputChange}                   name="price"                   className="input"                   />               </div>               <button className="button is-grey">Submit</button>             </form>           </div>                      <div className="box">             {               this.state.list.length ? (                 this.state.list.map(item => (                   <ul>                     <li key={item.id}>                       <p>{item.name}</p>                       <p>$  {item.price}</p>                     </li>                     <hr />                   </ul>                 ))               ) : <p>Your list is empty</p>             }           </div>         </section>       </React.Fragment>     )   } }  ReactDOM.render(   <App />,   document.getElementById('root') );

As items are added to the list, we need to update the state of the list to reflect those new items. To update the state of list using setState(), we’ll have to do this:

handleSubmit = (e) => {   e.preventDefault()   const newItem = {     id: uuid.v4(),     name: this.state.name,     price: this.state.price   }   this.setState({ list: [...this.state.list, newItem] }) };

If you have to update multiple states in the application, you’ll have to do a ton of spreading to create a new state using the old state and the additional value. Which can look more complex as the number of changes increases. With Immer, it becomes very easy to do that, as we did in the example above.

What if we want to add a function that gets called as a callback after the state update?In this case, let’s say we are keeping a tally of the number of items in the list and the total price of all the items.

See the Pen
immer 3 – shopping list
by Kingsley Silas Chijioke (@kinsomicrote)
on CodePen.

Say we want to calculate the amount that will be spent based on the price of items in the list, we can have the handleSubmit function look like this:

handleSubmit = (e) => {   e.preventDefault()   const newItem = {     id: uuid.v4(),     name: this.state.name,     price: this.state.price   }      this.setState(     produce(draft => {       draft.list = draft.list.concat(newItem)     }), () => {       this.calculateAmount(this.state.list)     }   ) };

First, we create an object using the data entered by the user, which we then assign to newItem. To update our application’s state, we make use of .concat() which will return a new array that’s comprised of the previous items and the new item. This updated copy is now set as the value of draft.list, which can then be used by Immer to update the state of the application.

The callback function gets called after the state update. It’s important to note that it makes use of the updated state.

The function we want to call will look like this:

calculateAmount = (list) => {   let total = 0;     for (let i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {       total += parseInt(list[i].price, 10)     }   this.setState(     produce(draft => {       draft.totalAmount = total     })   ) }

Let’s look at Immer hooks

use-immer is a hook that allows you to manage state in your React application. Let’s see this in action using a classic counter example.

import React from "react"; import {useImmer} from "use-immer";  const Counter = () => {   const [count, updateCounter] = useImmer({     value: 0   });    function increment() {     updateCounter(draft => {       draft.value = draft.value +1;     });   }    return (     <div>       <h1>         Counter {count.value}       </h1>       <br />       <button onClick={increment}>Increment</button>     </div>   ); }  export default Counter;

useImmer is similar to useState. The function returns the state and an updater function. When the component loads at first, the value of the state (which is count in this example), is the same as the value passed to useImmer. Using the updater function which is returned, we can then create an increment function to increase the value of the count.

There is also a useReducer-like hook for Immer.

import React, { useRef } from "react"; import {useImmerReducer } from "use-immer"; import uuidv4 from "uuid/v4" const initialState = []; const reducer = (draft, action) => {   switch (action.type) {     case "ADD_ITEM":       draft.push(action.item);       return;     case "CLEAR_LIST":       return initialState;     default:       return draft;   } } const Todo = () => {   const inputEl = useRef(null);   const [state, dispatch] = useImmerReducer(reducer, initialState);      const handleSubmit = (e) => {     e.preventDefault()     const newItem = {       id: uuidv4(),       text: inputEl.current.value     };     dispatch({ type: "ADD_ITEM", item: newItem });     inputEl.current.value = "";     inputEl.current.focus();   }      const handleClear = () => {     dispatch({ type: 'CLEAR_LIST' })   }      return (     <div className='App'>       <header className='App-header'>         <ul>           {state.map(todo => {             return <li key={todo.id}>{todo.text}</li>;           })}         </ul>         <form onSubmit={handleSubmit}>           <input type='text' ref={inputEl} />           <button             type='submit'           >             Add Todo           </button>         </form>         <button           onClick={handleClear}         >           Clear Todos         </button>       </header>     </div>   ); } export default Todo;

useImmerReducer takes in a reducer function and the initial state, and it returns both state and the dispatch function. We can then loop through the state to display the items we have. We dispatch an action when submitting a todo item and clearing the list of them. The dispatched action has a type which we use in determining what to do in the reducer function.
In the reducer function, we make use of draft like we did before, instead of state. With that, we have a convenient way of manipulating the state of our application.

You can find the code used in the above example on GitHub.

That’s a look at Immer!

Going forward, you can begin to make use of Immer in your next project, or even slowly begin to use it in the current project you’re working on. It has proven to aid in making state management convenient.

The post Using Immer for React State Management appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down

(This is a sponsored post.)

Who needs a project manager? You’re an organized person who can keep track of your own work, right?

Wrong.

Well, wrong if you’re part of a team. The thing about being self-organized is that it’s related to project management but not synonymous with it. Case in point: what happens if your project relies on someone else’s involvement? Sure you’re organized, but can you always say the same about your co-workers? Chances are you need something to keep everyone in sync so that a project stays on course.

That’s where you should consider trying monday.com.

monday.com is project management, but with a human touch. Sure, there’s task lists, assignments, milestones, due dates, and such like you would expect from any project management tool. That’s a given. That said, monday.com takes things up a notch by stripping away the barriers that prevent team members from collaborating with one another. For example, monday.com includes real-time messaging, file sharing, reporting, and a slew of other features that bridge the gaps between people and tasks so that everyone has purview into the progress of a project. Plus, it’s so pretty to look at.

There’s so much more than meets the eye because monday.com goes beyond project management. There’s resource management that ensures you have the right tools for a project, forecasting to affirm the prospect of a business opportunity, and even client management services. Seriously, your team and perhaps company can lean into monday.com and get a ton of use out of it.

You know what to do from here. Give monday.com a try. There’s a free trial and we’re sure you’ll find it to be so useful that you’ll want to stick with it well beyond.

Get Started

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

The post So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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, , , , ,
[Top]

So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down

(This is a sponsored post.)

Who needs a project manager? You’re an organized person who can keep track of your own work, right?

Wrong.

Well, wrong if you’re part of a team. The thing about being self-organized is that it’s related to project management but not synonymous with it. Case in point: what happens if your project relies on someone else’s involvement? Sure you’re organized, but can you always say the same about your co-workers? Chances are you need something to keep everyone in sync so that a project stays on course.

That’s where you should consider trying monday.com.

monday.com is project management, but with a human touch. Sure, there’s task lists, assignments, milestones, due dates, and such like you would expect from any project management tool. That’s a given. That said, monday.com takes things up a notch by stripping away the barriers that prevent team members from collaborating with one another. For example, monday.com includes real-time messaging, file sharing, reporting, and a slew of other features that bridge the gaps between people and tasks so that everyone has purview into the progress of a project. Plus, it’s so pretty to look at.

There’s so much more than meets the eye because monday.com goes beyond project management. There’s resource management that ensures you have the right tools for a project, forecasting to affirm the prospect of a business opportunity, and even client management services. Seriously, your team and perhaps company can lean into monday.com and get a ton of use out of it.

You know what to do from here. Give monday.com a try. There’s a free trial and we’re sure you’ll find it to be so useful that you’ll want to stick with it well beyond.

Get Started

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

The post So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , , , ,
[Top]

So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down

Who needs a project manager? You’re an organized person who can keep track of your own work, right?

Wrong.

Well, wrong if you’re part of a team. The thing about being self-organized is that it’s related to project management but not synonymous with it. Case in point: what happens if your project relies on someone else’s involvement? Sure you’re organized, but can you always say the same about your co-workers? Chances are you need something to keep everyone in sync so that a project stays on course.

That’s where you should consider trying monday.com.

monday.com is project management, but with a human touch. Sure, there’s task lists, assignments, milestones, due dates, and such like you would expect from any project management tool. That’s a given. That said, monday.com takes things up a notch by stripping away the barriers that prevent team members from collaborating with one another. For example, monday.com includes real-time messaging, file sharing, reporting, and a slew of other features that bridge the gaps between people and tasks so that everyone has purview into the progress of a project. Plus, it’s so pretty to look at.

There’s so much more than meets the eye because monday.com goes beyond project management. There’s resource management that ensures you have the right tools for a project, forecasting to affirm the prospect of a business opportunity, and even client management services. Seriously, your team and perhaps company can lean into monday.com and get a ton of use out of it.

You know what to do from here. Give monday.com a try. There’s a free 14-day trial and we’re sure you’ll find it to be so useful that you’ll want to stick with it well beyond.

Get Started

The post So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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Why monday.com is the Universal Team Management Tool for Your Team

(This is a sponsored post.)

This platform is perfect for teams sized at 2-to-200 — and gives every employee the same level of transparency.

Every project management tool seeks to do the same instrumental thing: keep teams connected, on task and on deadline to get major initiatives done. But the market is getting pretty crowded, and for good reason — no platform seems to have gotten the right feel for what people need to see, and how that information should be displayed so that it’s both actionable/relevant and contextualized.

That’s why monday.com is worth a shot. The platform is based off a simple, but powerful idea: that as humans, we like to feel like we’re contributing to part of a greater/effort good — an idea that sometimes gets lost in the shuffle as we focus on the details of getting stuff done. So projects are put onto a task board (think of it like a digital whiteboard), where everyone can have the same level of visibility into anyone else who’s contributing a set of tasks. That transparency breaks down the silos between teams that cause communication errors and costly project mistakes — and it’s a beautiful, simple way to connect people to the processes that drive forward big business initiatives.

Whether you’re part of a tech-forward team or not, monday.com is a welcome relief to cumbersome Excel files, messy (physical) whiteboards, or meetings that waste time when actual work could be completed. The scalable, intuitive structure can effectively work for a team of two, or an international team of 2,000+ — and a beautiful, color-coded board lays out tasks you can cleanly see and tag for various stages of completion. That way, employees can see exactly what needs to be done (and who needs to do it), while managers can optimize their time re-allocating resources as necessary to optimize processes. It’s a win-win.

monday.com also allows teams to communicate within the platform, cutting down on the amount of laborious sifting through various email threads to figure out a workflow. Messages can be sent inside of tasks — so all the communication is contextualized before meeting resolution or seeking it. The platform also supports uploads, so documents and videos can be added to facilitate more collaboration, and integration with other productivity apps. So if your team is already using tools like Slack, Google Calendar, Dropbox, Microsoft Excel, Trello, and Jira, there’s specific, clean shortcuts to integrate the information from those platforms into monday.com. And even beyond team communication and management, you can use monday.com for client-facing exchanges, so all your messages are consolidated into a single place.

The platform recently raised $ 50M in funding, and received nods from the likes of Forbes, Entrepreneur, Business Insider, and more for its ability to empower international teams to do better work together. Best of all, unlike other team management software, which can be pricey and time-intensive to scope, test and run, you can try monday.com today — for free.

What can this app do?

  • Creating and managing a project’s milestones
  • Creating and assigning tasks
  • Attaching files to any project’s table projects on the go.
  • Using mobile applications to manage projects
  • Communicating with your team members
  • Updating team using the news feed
  • Keeping clients in the loop
  • Organizing the organization into teams
  • Creating detailed project charts and reports
  • Tracking the time your team members spend on tasks
  • Managing a project’s financials
  • Website as well as a desktop app for Mac and Windows

monday.com to make every user feel empowered and part of something bigger than their own individual tasks, and as a result, to boost collective productivity and transparency.

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

The post Why monday.com is the Universal Team Management Tool for Your Team appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , , ,
[Top]

Why monday.com is the Universal Team Management Tool for Your Team

This platform is perfect for teams sized at 2-to-200 — and gives every employee the same level of transparency.

Every project management tool seeks to do the same instrumental thing: keep teams connected, on task and on deadline to get major initiatives done. But the market is getting pretty crowded, and for good reason — no platform seems to have gotten the right feel for what people need to see, and how that information should be displayed so that it’s both actionable/relevant and contextualized.

That’s why monday.com is worth a shot. The platform is based off a simple, but powerful idea: that as humans, we like to feel like we’re contributing to part of a greater/effort good — an idea that sometimes gets lost in the shuffle as we focus on the details of getting stuff done. So projects are put onto a task board (think of it like a digital whiteboard), where everyone can have the same level of visibility into anyone else who’s contributing a set of tasks. That transparency breaks down the silos between teams that cause communication errors and costly project mistakes — and it’s a beautiful, simple way to connect people to the processes that drive forward big business initiatives.

Whether you’re part of a tech-forward team or not, monday.com is a welcome relief to cumbersome Excel files, messy (physical) whiteboards, or meetings that waste time when actual work could be completed. The scalable, intuitive structure can effectively work for a team of two, or an international team of 2,000+ — and a beautiful, color-coded board lays out tasks you can cleanly see and tag for various stages of completion. That way, employees can see exactly what needs to be done (and who needs to do it), while managers can optimize their time re-allocating resources as necessary to optimize processes. It’s a win-win.

monday.com also allows teams to communicate within the platform, cutting down on the amount of laborious sifting through various email threads to figure out a workflow. Messages can be sent inside of tasks — so all the communication is contextualized before meeting resolution or seeking it. The platform also supports uploads, so documents and videos can be added to facilitate more collaboration, and integration with other productivity apps. So if your team is already using tools like Slack, Google Calendar, Dropbox, Microsoft Excel, Trello, and Jira, there’s specific, clean shortcuts to integrate the information from those platforms into monday.com. And even beyond team communication and management, you can use monday.com for client-facing exchanges, so all your messages are consolidated into a single place.

The platform recently raised $ 50M in funding, and received nods from the likes of Forbes, Entrepreneur, Business Insider, and more for its ability to empower international teams to do better work together. Best of all, unlike other team management software, which can be pricey and time-intensive to scope, test and run, you can try monday.com today — for free.

What can this app do?

  • Creating and managing a project’s milestones
  • Creating and assigning tasks
  • Attaching files to any project’s table projects on the go.
  • Using mobile applications to manage projects
  • Communicating with your team members
  • Updating team using the news feed
  • Keeping clients in the loop
  • Organizing the organization into teams
  • Creating detailed project charts and reports
  • Tracking the time your team members spend on tasks
  • Managing a project’s financials
  • Website as well as a desktop app for Mac and Windows

monday.com to make every user feel empowered and part of something bigger than their own individual tasks, and as a result, to boost collective productivity and transparency.

The post Why monday.com is the Universal Team Management Tool for Your Team appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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[Top]