Tag: like

Technical Debt is Like Tetris

Here’s a wonderful post by Eric Higgins all about refactoring and technical debt. He compares giant refactoring projects to being similar to Tetris:

Similar to running a business, Tetris gets harder the longer you play. Pieces move faster and it becomes harder to keep up.

Similar to running a business, you can never win Tetris. There is no true finish line. You only control how quickly you lose.

Similar to running a business, allowing too many gaps to build up in Tetris will cause you to lose.

I love this comparison, despite my mediocre Tetris skills. It does feel like even “easy” development becomes harder as technical debt grows on a project, much the same way Tetris pieces gain speed and provide little time to react as the stack grows. However, I do think perhaps I have a more optimistic view of technical debt overall. If you work slowly and carefully then you can build up a culture of refactoring and gather momentum over time.

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More Like position: tricky;

I rather like position: sticky;. It has practical use cases. I think of things like keeping a table of contents in a sidebar of a long article, but as a fairly simple implementation and without risk of overlapping things in awkward ways. But Elad Shechter is right here: it’s not used that much — at least partially — and probably because it’s a bit weird to understand.

I like how Elad explains it with a “Sticky Item” and a “Sticky Container.” The container needs to be large enough that scrolling is relevant and for the stickiness to do anything at all.

There are other gotchas, too. I feel like every time I try position: sticky; in a real context, I have about a 30% chance of it working. There always seems to be some parent/child relationship thing that I can’t quite work out to prevent overlaps. Or, there is some parent element with overflow: hidden;, which, for reasons unbeknownst to me, breaks this.

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Styling a Select Like It’s 2019

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Web Designs That Feel Like Ancient History, but Are More Recent Than You Think

Flickr announced not long ago that they are limiting free accounts to 1,000 photos. I don’t particularly mind that (because it seems like sound business sense), although it is a bit sad that a ton of photos will be nuked from the internet. I imagine the Internet Archive will swoop in and get most of it. And oh hey, the Twitter account @FlickrJubilee is showcasing Flickr users that could really use a gifted pro account so their amazing photos are not lost, if you’re feeling generous and want to contribute.

This change doesn’t affect pro accounts. I’ve been pro forever on Flickr, so my photos were never at risk, but the big change has me thinking it’s about time to spin down Flickr for myself. I’ve been keeping all my photos on iCloud/Photos for years now anyway so it seems kind redundant to keep Flickr around.

I went into the Flickr settings and exported all my photos, got a bunch of gigabytes of exported photos, and loaded them into Photos. Sadly, the exported photos have zero metadata, so there will forever be this obnoxious chunk of thousands upon thousands of photos in my Photos collection that all look like they were taken on the same day and with no location.

Anyway, that was way too long of an intro to say: I found a bunch of old website screenshots! Not a ton, but it looks like I used Flickr to store a handful of web designs I found interesting in some way a number of years back. What’s interesting today is how dated they look when they were created not that long ago. Shows how fast things change.

Here they are.


It’s not terribly surprising to me to hear people push back on the same-ness of web design these days, and to blame things like frameworks, component-driven architecture, and design systems for it. It wasn’t long ago when it seemed like we were trying harder to be fancy and unique with our designs — things like shadow treatments, reflective images and skeuomorphic enhancements. I don’t mean to make sweeping generalizations here… merely a difference between what we considered to be boring and fancy work back than compared to now, of course.

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Exclusions will hopefully be like more powerful grid-friendly floats

Exclusions (which are currently in a “working draft” spec as I write) are kinda like float in that they allow inline content to wrap around an element. But not exactly a float. Chen Hui Jing has an excellent explanation:

An exclusion element is a block-level element which is not a float, and generates an exclusion box. An exclusion element establishes a new block formatting context.

An element becomes an exclusion when its wrap-flow property is computed to something other than its initial value of auto. When an element becomes an exclusion, inline content will wrap around the exclusion areas, but within their own formatting contexts.

Source: Chen’s article

Support is limited to Edge and IE (again, as I write):

This browser support data is from Caniuse, which has more detail. A number indicates that browser supports the feature at that version and up.

Desktop

Chrome Opera Firefox IE Edge Safari
No No No 10* 12* No

Mobile / Tablet

iOS Safari Opera Mobile Opera Mini Android Android Chrome Android Firefox
No No No No No No

Chen makes a great case for why they are useful, but another round of discussion has cropped up lately as well. Rob Weychert documents a simple layout situation in which an image is floated left and text is wrapping around it:

Source: Rob’s article

As those light red bars indicate, Rob has set up some display: grid; columns to align elements in the article to those axes. A classic “editorial layout” indeed. But there really is no good mechanism to place that image onto the grid and maintain the wrapping. By placing both the content and the image into separate grid items, you don’t get the wrapping. You can use float, but that’s not using the grid.

Rachel Andrew chimed in that the answer is CSS exclusions. While Rob’s example ultimately had to use floats, Rachel re-did it with exclusions. Exclusions make the code much simpler.

/* with floats, replicating exactly what the grid is doing */ img {   float: left;   width: calc( 3 * ((100% - 50px - 15em) / 6) + 50px + 2em ); }  /* with exclusions, using the grid */ img {   grid-row: 2;   grid-column: 1 / 3;   -ms-wrap-flow: both; }

Perhaps we can chime in with thumbs up on Rachel’s call to see what’s up with the status of the spec and with other author use cases.

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When’s the last time you SFTP’d (or the like) into a server and changed a file directly?

In the grand tradition of every single poll question I’ve ever posted, the poll below has a has a fundamental flaw. In this case, there is no option between “In the last month” and “Never” but, alas, the results are interesting:

What I was trying to get at with this poll is how many people do and don’t do any sort of editing of production files directly and instead work locally. I don’t think I need to launch a major investigation to know that it’s most people and more than in the past.

Most workflows these days have us working locally and pushing new and updated files through a version control system, and even through systems beyond that, perhaps continuous integration processes, testing processes, actions, deployment — it’s big world of DevOps out there! Rarely do we skip the line and dip our fingers into production servers and make live manipulations. Cowboy coding, they sometimes call it.

But just because you don’t generally code that way doesn’t mean you never do it, which is another flaw of this poll. I know DevOps nerds who are constantly SSH-ing into servers to manipulate configuration files. I personally still hop into Coda and will directly SFTP into servers sometimes to edit .htaccess files, which are sometimes on my production sites and dev sites and that I generally .gitignore.

Anyways, I think this is a fun thing to talk about, so feel free to have at it in the comments. I’d love to hear to what degree you cowboy code. Still do it all the time and love it? Do you do it because you haven’t learned another way or that’s how your workplace demands? Do you have a personal philosophy about it? Let the rodeo begin. 🤠

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