Tag: Kinda.

Equal Width Columns in CSS Grid are Kinda Weird

Everything is flexible these days. If you write grid-template-columns: 200px 200px 200px;, sure, you’d have equal-width columns, but that’s a rare day. What you usually mean is three columns of equal fluid width.

We’ve got fractional units for that, like grid-template-columns: 1fr 1fr fr;. That’s usually fine, but they aren’t very sturdy like pixels. A large bit of media (or something like a <pre>, or long bit of text like a URL) can cause those columns to stretch and that’s almost never what you want. I’ve called that a grid blowout. The big idea is that the minimum width of a 1fr column is auto, not 0. In other words,. those widened columns are just being as narrow as they know how to be!

To fix that, we can do like:

.el {   grid-template-columns: minmax(0, 1fr) minmax(0, 1fr) minmax(0, 1fr); }

..or we could shorten it:

.el {   grid-template-columns: repeat(3, minmax(0, 1fr)); }

It’s a little awkward, but OK. You only gotta learn it once. You might not even ever run into this if you’re always setting max-width on your media and handling line breaks.

If you want to make your columns sturdy again without the minmax dance, you could use percentages rather than pixels and stay flexible. But what percentage do you use? 33.33%? That’s fine as long as you don’t have any gap — otherwise, the gap will add to the width and overflow the container. You could fake gaps by putting padding inside the columns, but that’s a little janky and uneven.

This whole thing comes from a great tweet from Wes Bos:

I know a ton of people run into this — based on the number of emails I get about the grid blowout article — so it’s worth kinda internalizing why all this is the way it is. It probably should be easier but I don’t have any particular suggestions on how it could be.

The post Equal Width Columns in CSS Grid are Kinda Weird appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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A Little Reminder That Pseudo Elements are Children, Kinda.

Here’s a container with some child elements:

<div class="container">   <div>item</div>   <div>item</div>   <div>item</div> </div>

If I do:

.container::before {   content: "x" }

I’m essentially doing:

<div class="container">   [[[ ::before psuedo-element here ]]]   <div>item</div>   <div>item</div>   <div>item</div> </div>

Which will behave just like a child element mostly. One tricky thing is that no selector selects it other than the one you used to create it (or a similar selector that is literally a ::before or ::after that ends up in the same place).

To illustrate, say I set up that container to be a 2×2 grid and make each item a kind of pillbox design:

.container {   display: grid;   grid-template-columns: 1fr 1fr;   grid-gap: 0.5rem; }  .container > * {   background: darkgray;   border-radius: 4px;   padding: 0.5rem; }

Without the pseudo-element, that would be like this:

Six items in a clean two-by-two grid

If I add that pseudo-element selector as above, I’d get this:

Six items in a two-by-two grid, but with a seventh item at the beginning, pushing elements over by one

It makes sense, but it can also come as a surprise. Pseudo-elements are often decorative (they should pretty much only be decorative), so having it participate in a content grid just feels weird.

Notice that the .container > * selector didn’t pick it up and make it darkgray because you can’t select a pseudo-element that way. That’s another minor gotcha.

In my day-to-day, I find pseudo-elements are typically absolutely-positioned to do something decorative — so, if you had:

.container::before {   content: "";   position: absolute;   /* Do something decorative */ }

…you probably wouldn’t even notice. Technically, the pseudo-element is still a child, so it’s still in there doing its thing, but isn’t participating in the grid. This isn’t unique to CSS Grid either. For instance, you’ll find by using flexbox that your pseudo-element becomes a flex item. You’re free to float your pseudo-element or do any other sort of layout with it as well.

DevTools makes it fairly clear that it is in the DOM like a child element:

DevTools with a ::before element selected

There are a couple more gotchas!

One is :nth-child(). You’d think that if pseduo-elements are actually children, they would effect :nth-child() calculations, but they don’t. That means doing something like this:

.container > :nth-child(2) {   background: red; }

…is going to select the same element whether or not there is a ::before pseudo-element or not. The same is true for ::after and :nth-last-child and friends. That’s why I put “kinda” in the title. If pseudo-elements were exactly like child elements, they would affect these selectors.

Another gotcha is that you can’t select a pseudo-element in JavaScript like you could a regular child element. document.querySelector(".container::before"); is going to return null. If the reason you are trying to get your hands on the pseudo-element in JavaScript is to see its styles, you can do that with a little CSSOM magic:

const styles = window.getComputedStyle(   document.querySelector('.container'),   '::before' ); console.log(styles.content); // "x" console.log(styles.color); // rgb(255, 0, 0) console.log(styles.getPropertyValue('color'); // rgb(255, 0, 0)

Have you run into any gotchas with pseudo-elements?

The post A Little Reminder That Pseudo Elements are Children, Kinda. appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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