Tag: InBrowser

What if… you could use Visual Studio Code as the editor of in-browser Developer Tools?

It’s not uncommon for my front-end workflow to go something like this:

  1. Work on thing.
  2. See that thing in an automatically refreshed browser.
  3. See something wrong with that thing.
  4. Inspect and correct the thing in DevTools.
  5. Apply the correct code in my code editor.
  6. See that correct code automatically refreshed in the browser.

I know, it’s not always great. But I’d bet the lint in my pocket you do something similar, at least every now and then.

That’s why I was drawn to the title of Chris Hellman’s post: “What if… you could use Visual Studio Code as the editor of in-browser Developer Tools?”

The idea is that VS Code can be used as the editor for DevTools and we can do it today by enabling it as an experimental feature, alongside Microsoft Edge. So, no, this is not like a prime-time ready universal thing, but watch Chris as he activates the feature, connects VS Code to DevTools, gives DevTools access to write files, then inspects the page of a local URL.

Now, those changes I make in DevTools can be synced back to VS Code, and I have direct access to open and view specific files from DevTools to see my code in context. Any changes I make in DevTools get reflected back in the VS Code files, and any changes I make in VS Code are updated live in the browser. Brilliant.

I’m not sure if this will become a thing beyond Edge but that sort of cross-over work between platforms is something that really excites me.

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In-Browser Performance Linting With Feature Policies

Here’s a neat idea from Tim Kadlec. He uses the Modheader extension to toggle custom headers in his browser. It also lets him see when images are too big and need to be optimized in some way. This is a great way to catch issues like this in a local environment because browsers will throw an error and won’t display them at all!

As Tim mentions, the trick is with the Feature Policy header with the oversized-images policy, and he toggles it on like this:

Feature-Policy: oversized-images ‘none’;

Tim writes:

By default, if you provide the browser an image in a format it supports, it will display it. It even helpful scales those images so they look great, even if you’ve provided a massive file. Because of this, it’s not immediately obvious when you’ve provided an image that is larger than the site needs.

The oversized-images policy tells the browser not to allow any images that are more than some predefined factor of their container size. The recommended default threshold is 2x, but you are able to override that if you would like.

I love this idea of using the browser to do linting work for us! I wonder what other ways we could use the browser to place guard rails around our work to prevent future mistakes…

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