Tag: Focus

Having a Little Fun With Custom Focus Styles

Every front-end developer has dealt or will deal with this scenario: your boss, client or designer thinks the outline applied by browsers on focused elements does not match the UI, and asks you to remove it. Or you might even be looking to remove it yourself.

So you do a little research and find out that this is strongly discouraged, because the focus outline is there for a reason: it provides visual feedback for keyboard navigation (using the Tab key), letting users who can’t use a mouse or have a visual impairment know where they are on the screen.

This button shows a focus state with Chrome’s default outline style.

That doesn’t mean you’re stuck with this outline, though. Instead of removing it, you can simply replace it with something else. That way, you’ll keep your interface accessible and get more flexibility on how it looks, so you can better match your UI.

You can start by removing the default browser outline by selecting the focused state of the element and applying outline: none. Then, you may choose from each of the options ahead to replace it:

Change the background color

This works best for elements that can be filled, such as buttons. Select the focused state of the element and apply a contrasting background color to it. The higher the contrast the better because subtle changes may not be strong enough visual cues, particularly in cases where with color blindness and low-vision.

In the example below, both background and border color change; you may pick either or both.

Click or focus with the Tab key to view how this state looks.

See the Pen
Elements replacing native outline focus with background color
by Lari (@larimaza)
on CodePen.

Change the text color

If the element has any text, you can select the focused state and change its color. This also works for icons applied with mask-image; you can select the icon as a descendant of the focused element and change its background color, like the example button below.

See the Pen
Elements replacing native outline focus with text and icon color
by Lari (@larimaza)
on CodePen.

Again, contrast is key. You may also consider using an underline on text links and making it part of the changed state because, as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines state:

Color is not used as the only visual means of conveying information, indicating an action, prompting a response, or distinguishing a visual element. (Level A)
Understanding Success Criterion 1.4.1

Apply a box shadow

The box-shadow property can do exactly the same job as the outline, except it’s much more powerful — you can now control its color, opacity, offset, blur radius and spread radius. And if a border-radius is specified, the box shadow follows the same rounded corners.

See the Pen
Elements replacing native outline focus with box shadow
by Lari (@larimaza)
on CodePen.

You can get really creative with this technique (seriously though, don’t do this):

See the Pen
Elements replacing native outline focus with insane box shadow
by Lari (@larimaza)
on CodePen.

This works for virtually any type of focusable element, like toggles, checkboxes, radio buttons and slides.

See the Pen
Toggle and radio button replacing native outline focus with box shadow
by Lari (@larimaza)
on CodePen.

Increase the element’s size

As an alternative to color change, you may also resort to subtle size modification as focus feedback. In this example, we’re using transform: scale.

See the Pen
Elements replacing native outline focus with transform scale
by Lari (@larimaza)
on CodePen.

The key here is subtlety. Extreme size changes may cause content reflow, not to mention a poor experience for those who prefer reduced motion.

Replicate existing hover styles

If the element already has a contrasting hover style, you can simply take that style and apply it for the focused state as well. This is a rather elegant solution, as you don’t have to add any new colors or outlines to the interface.

Here’s an example where both the focus and hover states adopt a high contrast to the background of an element’s default style:

See the Pen
Elements replacing native outline focus with hover styles
by Lari (@larimaza)
on CodePen.

Bonus: Customize the default outline

Everything we’ve looked at so far takes the assumption that we want to remove the focus outline altogether. We don’t have to! In fact, it’s a border that we can customize.

button:focus {   outline: 3px dashed orange; }

That’s shorthand and could have been written this way if we want to fine-tune the styles:

button:focus {   outline-width: 3px;   outline-style: dashed;   outline-color: orange; }

One additional superpower we have is the outline-offset property, which is separate from the outline shorthand property but can be used alongside it to change the position of the focus ring:

button:focus {   outline: 3px dashed orange;   outline-offset: 10px; }

Conclusion

You can mix and match all of these options to get custom styles that look appropriate for each component type within your interface.

And it’s worth repeating: Don’t forget to use stark color contrasts and other visual cues in addition to color when adopting custom focus states. Sure, we all want an experience that aligns with our designs, but we can adhere to good accessibility practices in the process. The W3C recommends this tool to test the contrast of colors values against the WCAG guidelines.

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Animated Position of Focus Ring

Maurice Mahan created FocusOverlay, a “library for creating overlays on focused elements.” That description is a little confusing at you don’t need a library to create focus styles. What the library actually does is animate the focus rings as focus moves from one element to another. It’s based on the same idea as Flying Focus.

I’m not strong enough in my accessibility knowledge to give a definitive answer if this is a great idea or not, but my mind goes like this:

  • It’s a neat effect.
  • I can imagine it being an accessibility win since, while the page will scroll to make sure the next focused element is visible, it doesn’t otherwise help you see where that focus has gone. Movement that directs attention toward the next focused element may help make it more clear.
  • I can imagine it being harmful to accessibility in that it is motion that isn’t usually there and could be surprising.

On that last point, you could conditionally load it depending on a user’s motion preference.

The library is on npm, but is also available as direct linkage thanks to UNPKG. Let’s look at using the URLs to the resources directly to illustrate the concept of conditional loading:

<link    rel="stylesheet"    href="//unpkg.com/focus-overlay@latest/dist/focusoverlay.css"    media="prefers-reduced-motion: no-preference" />  <script> const mq = window.matchMedia("(prefers-reduced-motion: no-preference)");  if (mq.matches) {   let script = document.createElement("script");   script.src = "//unpkg.com/focus-overlay@latest/dist/focusoverlay.js";   document.head.appendChild(script); } </script>

The JavaScript is also 11.5 KB / 4.2 KB compressed and the CSS is 453 B / 290 B compressed, so you’ve always got to factor that into as performance and accessibility are related concepts.

Performance isn’t just script size either. Looking through the code, it looks like the focus ring is created by appending a <div> to the <body> that has a super high z-index value in which to be seen and pointer-events: none as to not interfere. Then it is absolutely positioned with top and left values and sized with width and height. It looks like new positional information is calculated and then applied to this div, and CSS handles the movement. Last I understood, those aren’t particularly performant CSS properties to animate, so I would think a future feature here would be to use animation FLIP to take advantage of only animating transforms.

The post Animated Position of Focus Ring appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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Weekly Platform News: WebAPK Limited to Chrome, Discernible Focus Rectangles, Modal Window API

In this week’s roundup: “Add to home screen” has different meanings in Android, Chrome and Edge add some pop to focus rectangles on form inputs, and how third-party sites may be coming to a modal near you.

Let’s get into the news.

WebAPKs are not available to Firefox on Android

On Android, both Chrome and Firefox have an “Add to home screen” option, but while Firefox merely adds a shortcut for the web app to the user’s home screen, Chrome actually installs the web app (as long as it meets the PWA install criteria) via a WebAPK.

Progressive Web Apps installed in such a way are added to the device’s app drawer, and URLs that are within the PWA’s scope (as specified in its manifest) open in the PWA instead of the default browser.

Tiger Oakes who is implementing PWA-related features at Mozilla, explains why Firefox cannot install PWAs on Android: “WebAPK is not available to us since we don’t own an app store like Google Play and Galaxy Apps.”

(via Tiger Oakes)

More accessible focus rectangles are coming to Chrome and Edge

Microsoft and Google have made accessibility improvements to various form controls. The two main changes are the larger touch targets on the time and date inputs, and the redesigned focus rectangles that are now easily discernible on any background.

The updated form controls are available in the preview version of Edge. Mac users may have to manually enable the “Web Platform Fluent Controls” flag on the about:flags page.

(via Microsoft Edge Dev)

A newly proposed API for loading third-parties in modal windows

The proposed Modal Window API would allow a website to load another website in a modal window (in a top-level browsing context) for the purposes of authentication, payments, sharing, access to third-party services, etc.

Only a single modal window would be allowed at a time, and the two websites could communicate with each other via message events (postMessage method).

This API is intended as a better alternative to existing methods, such as pop-ups, which can be confusing to users and blocked by browsers, and redirects, which cause the original context to be torn down and recreated (or completely lost in the case of an error in the third-party service).

(via Adrian Hope-Bailie)

More news…

Read even more news in my weekly Sunday issue that can be delivered to you via email every Monday morning.

More News →

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Keyboard-Only Focus Styles

Like Eric Bailey says, if it’s interactive, it needs a focus style. Perhaps your best bet? Don’t remove the dang outlines that focusable elements have by default. If you’re going to rock a button { outline: 0; }, for example, then you’d better do a button:focus { /* something else very obvious visually */ }. I handled a ticket just today where a missing focus style was harming a user who relies on visual focus styles to navigate the web.

But those focus styles are most useful when tabbing or otherwise navigating with a keyboard, and less so when they are triggered by a mouse click. Now we’ve got :focus-visible! Nelo writes:

TLDR; :focus-visible is the keyboard-only version of :focus.

Also, the W3C proposal mentions that :focus-visible should be preferred over :focus except on elements that expect a keyboard input (e.g. text field, contenteditable).

(Also see his article for a good demo on why mouse clicking and focus styles can be at odds, beyond a general dislike of fuzzy blue outlines.)

Browser support for :focus-visible is pretty rough:

This browser support data is from Caniuse, which has more detail. A number indicates that browser supports the feature at that version and up.

Desktop

Chrome Opera Firefox IE Edge Safari
No No 4* No No No

Mobile / Tablet

iOS Safari Opera Mobile Opera Mini Android Android Chrome Android Firefox
No No No No No 62*

But it does have Firefox support, and as Lea Verou says:

… once Chrome ships its implementation it will explode in a matter of 1-2 months.

That’s generally how things go these days. Once two major browsers have support — and one of them is Chrome — that’s a huge enough slice of the web that can start using it. Especially when it can be done as safely as this property.

Safely, as in, there is an official polyfill, meaning you can nuke default focus styles and just use :focus-visible styles:

/* Remove outline for non-keyboard :focus */ *:focus:not(.focus-visible) {   outline: none; }  /* Optional: Customize .focus-visible */ .focus-visible {   outline: lightgreen solid 2px; }

But, as Patrick H. Lauke documented, you can do it even without the polyfill, using careful selector usage and un-doing styles as needed:

button:focus { /* Some exciting button focus styles */ } button:focus:not(:focus-visible) {   /* Undo all the above focused button styles      if the button has focus but the browser wouldn't normally      show default focus styles */ } button:focus-visible { /* Some even *more* exciting button focus styles */ }

Seems like a nice improvement for the web.

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