Tag: Fancy

Let’s Make One of Those Fancy Scrolling Animations Used on Apple Product Pages

Apple is well-known for the sleek animations on their product pages. For example, as you scroll down the page products may slide into view, MacBooks fold open and iPhones spin, all while showing off the hardware, demonstrating the software and telling interactive stories of how the products are used.

Just check out this video of the mobile web experience for the iPad Pro:

Source: Twitter

A lot of the effects that you see there aren’t created in just HTML and CSS. What then, you ask? Well, it can be a little hard to figure out. Even using the browser’s DevTools won’t always reveal the answer, as it often can’t see past a <canvas> element.

Let’s take an in-depth look at one of these effects to see how it’s made so you can recreate some of these magical effects in our own projects. Specifically, let’s replicate the AirPods Pro product page and the shifting light effect in the hero image.

The basic concept

The idea is to create an animation just like a sequence of images in rapid succession. You know, like a flip book! No complex WebGL scenes or advanced JavaScript libraries are needed.

By synchronizing each frame to the user’s scroll position, we can play the animation as the user scrolls down (or back up) the page.

Start with the markup and styles

The HTML and CSS for this effect is very easy as the magic happens inside the <canvas> element which we control with JavaScript by giving it an ID.

In CSS, we’ll give our document a height of 100vh and make our <body> 5⨉ taller than that to give ourselves the necessary scroll length to make this work. We’ll also match the background color of the document with the background color of our images.

The last thing we’ll do is position the <canvas>, center it, and limit the max-width and height so it does not exceed the dimensions of the viewport.

html {   height: 100vh; } 
 body {   background: #000;   height: 500vh; } 
 canvas {   position: fixed;   left: 50%;   top: 50%;   max-height: 100vh;   max-width: 100vw;   transform: translate(-50%, -50%); }

Right now, we are able to scroll down the page (even though the content does not exceed the viewport height) and our <canvas> stays at the top of the viewport. That’s all the HTML and CSS we need.

Let’s move on to loading the images.

Fetching the correct images

Since we’ll be working with an image sequence (again, like a flip book), we’ll assume the file names are numbered sequentially in ascending order (i.e. 0001.jpg, 0002.jpg, 0003.jpg, etc.) in the same directory.

We’ll write a function that returns the file path with the number of the image file we want, based off of the user’s scroll position.

const currentFrame = index => (   `https://www.apple.com/105/media/us/airpods-pro/2019/1299e2f5_9206_4470_b28e_08307a42f19b/anim/sequence/large/01-hero-lightpass/$ {index.toString().padStart(4, '0')}.jpg` )

Since the image number is an integer, we’ll need to turn it in to a string and use padStart(4, '0') to prepend zeros in front of our index until we reach four digits to match our file names. So, for example, passing 1 into this function will return 0001.

That gives us a way to handle image paths. Here’s the first image in the sequence drawn on the <canvas> element:

As you can see, the first image is on the page. At this point, it’s just a static file. What we want is to update it based on the user’s scroll position. And we don’t merely want to load one image file and then swap it out by loading another image file. We want to draw the images on the <canvas> and update the drawing with the next image in the sequence (but we’ll get to that in just a bit).

We already made the function to generate the image filepath based on the number we pass into it so what we need to do now is track the user’s scroll position and determine the corresponding image frame for that scroll position.

Connecting images to the user’s scroll progress

To know which number we need to pass (and thus which image to load) in the sequence, we need to calculate the user’s scroll progress. We’ll make an event listener to track that and handle some math to calculate which image to load.

We need to know:

  • Where scrolling starts and ends
  • The user’s scroll progress (i.e. a percentage of how far the user is down the page)
  • The image that corresponds to the user’s scroll progress

We’ll use scrollTop to get the vertical scroll position of the element, which in our case happens to be the top of the document. That will serve as the starting point value. We’ll get the end (or maximum) value by subtracting the window height from the document scroll height. From there, we’ll divide the scrollTop value by the maximum value the user can scroll down, which gives us the user’s scroll progress.

Then we need to turn that scroll progress into an index number that corresponds with the image numbering sequence for us to return the correct image for that position. We can do this by multiplying the progress number by the number of frames (images) we have. We’ll use Math.floor() to round that number down and wrap it in Math.min() with our maximum frame count so it never exceeds the total number of frames.

window.addEventListener('scroll', () => {     const scrollTop = html.scrollTop;   const maxScrollTop = html.scrollHeight - window.innerHeight;   const scrollFraction = scrollTop / maxScrollTop;   const frameIndex = Math.min(     frameCount - 1,     Math.floor(scrollFraction * frameCount)   ); });

Updating <canvas> with the correct image

We now know which image we need to draw as the user’s scroll progress changes. This is where the magic of  <canvas> comes into play. <canvas> has many cool features for building everything from games and animations to design mockup generators and everything in between!

One of those features is a method called requestAnimationFrame that works with the browser to update <canvas> in a way we couldn’t do if we were working with straight image files instead. This is why I went with a <canvas> approach instead of, say, an <img> element or a <div> with a background image.

requestAnimationFrame will match the browser refresh rate and enable hardware acceleration by using WebGL to render it using the device’s video card or integrated graphics. In other words, we’ll get super smooth transitions between frames — no image flashes!

Let’s call this function in our scroll event listener to swap images as the user scrolls up or down the page. requestAnimationFrame takes a callback argument, so we’ll pass a function that will update the image source and draw the new image on the <canvas>:

requestAnimationFrame(() => updateImage(frameIndex + 1))

We’re bumping up the frameIndex by 1 because, while the image sequence starts at 0001.jpg, our scroll progress calculation starts actually starts at 0. This ensures that the two values are always aligned.

The callback function we pass to update the image looks like this:

const updateImage = index => {   img.src = currentFrame(index);   context.drawImage(img, 0, 0); }

We pass the frameIndex into the function. That sets the image source with the next image in the sequence, which is drawn on our <canvas> element.

Even better with image preloading

We’re technically done at this point. But, come on, we can do better! For example, scrolling quickly results in a little lag between image frames. That’s because every new image sends off a new network request, requiring a new download.

We should try preloading the images new network requests. That way, each frame is already downloaded, making the transitions that much faster, and the animation that much smoother!

All we’ve gotta do is loop through the entire sequence of images and load ‘em up:

const frameCount = 148; 
 const preloadImages = () => {   for (let i = 1; i < frameCount; i++) {     const img = new Image();     img.src = currentFrame(i);   } }; 
 preloadImages();

Demo!

A quick note on performance

While this effect is pretty slick, it’s also a lot of images. 148 to be exact.

No matter much we optimize the images, or how speedy the CDN is that serves them, loading hundreds of images will always result in a bloated page. Let’s say we have multiple instances of this on the same page. We might get performance stats like this:

1,609 requests, 55.8 megabytes transferred, 57.5 megabytes resources, load time of 30.45 seconds.

That might be fine for a high-speed internet connection without tight data caps, but we can’t say the same for users without such luxuries. It’s a tricky balance to strike, but we have to be mindful of everyone’s experience — and how our decisions affect them.

A few things we can do to help strike that balance include:

  • Loading a single fallback image instead of the entire image sequence
  • Creating sequences that use smaller image files for certain devices
  • Allowing the user to enable the sequence, perhaps with a button that starts and stops the sequence

Apple employs the first option. If you load the AirPods Pro page on a mobile device connected to a slow 3G connection and, hey, the performance stats start to look a whole lot better:

8 out of 111 requests, 347 kilobytes of 2.6 megabytes transferred, 1.4 megabytes of 4.5 megabytes resources, load time of one minute and one second.

Yeah, it’s still a heavy page. But it’s a lot lighter than what we’d get without any performance considerations at all. That’s how Apple is able to get get so many complex sequences onto a single page.


Further reading

If you are interested in how these image sequences are generated, a good place to start is the Lottie library by AirBnB. The docs take you through the basics of generating animations with After Effects while providing an easy way to include them in projects.

The post Let’s Make One of Those Fancy Scrolling Animations Used on Apple Product Pages appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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Getting Fancy with position: sticky;

Mike Solomon worked on a fancy scrollytelling post for Esquire and blogged about it. It has GIFs of each step along the way of figuring out not just position: sticky; but also using negative margins, wrapper divs, backgrounds, and even a smidge of JavaScript measuring to get it all right.

What it doesn’t have is any isolated demo of the effect. I figured I’d give a crack at reverse engineering it.

Here’s mine, which I’ll call “Sticky Figcaption with Protruding Figure”:

That demo is full of magic numbers to make the exit do the “tuck behind” effect. If that’s not important, this version is much cleaner.

Probably not quiteas Mike had it, but I’m not privy to the exact details he was going for in the blog post. His final GIF is:

Here’s a quick video I’ll shoot from the article itself in case that inspires you to figure out a different approach:


Erp! I actually spoke with Mike about all this, and he says that the main takeaway from all this (which flew right over my head — sorry Mike!) is that “sticky isn’t just for the top of the screen.” Notice in the final product how the sticky element becomes sticky long before it becomes the element at the top of the screen. It’s more like the middle of the screen. That’s what the top value is for with position: sticky; but, in this demo where the goal is to have it slide in and out of an image, it gets tricky.

After some back and forth forking…

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

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Let’s Make a Fancy, but Uncomplicated Page Loader

It’s pretty common to see a loading state on sites these days, particularly as progressive web apps and reactive sites are on the rise. It’s one way to improve “perceived” performance — that is, making it feel as though the site is loading faster than it actually is.

There’s no shortage of ways to make a loader — all it takes is a quick search on CodePen to see oodles of examples, from animated GIFs to complex animations. While it’s tempting to build the fanciest of the fancy loaders, we can actually do a pretty darn good job with only a minimal amount of CSS and JavaScript.

Here’s an example we can make together.

See the Pen
Preloader with JavaScript FadeOut
by Maks Akymenko (@maximakymenko)
on CodePen.

SVG and CSS is all we need for the spinner

I’m going to assume that you’ve already created a project, so we’ll jump right in and start with the spinner — or “pre-loader” as it is also called.

SVG is a great option for a spinner. It’s scalable and implementing it is as easy as an image tag. We could make one from scratch, say in an image editor like Illustrator, Sketch or Figma. For this example, I’m just going to grab this one from loading.io, which is a nice resource to make and customize different loaders.

Now that we have an SVG for the visual, we can drop it into HTML:

<div class="preloader">   <img src="spinner.svg" alt="spinner"> </div>

We’re using .preloader as a wrapper, mostly because it helps us position the image on the page, but also because it will help us hide and reveal the page content while the loader works.

Let’s style it up:

.preloader {   align-items: center;   background: rgb(23, 22, 22);   display: flex;   height: 100vh;   justify-content: center;   left: 0;   position: fixed;   top: 0;   transition: opacity 0.3s linear;   width: 100%;   z-index: 9999; }

This is doing a few things that are more than cosmetic:

  • We’re displaying the loader directly in the center of the screen, using flexbox properties and values.
  • We’ve made the element take up the entire width and height of the screen and given it a black (well, actually a really, really dark gray) background. That means anything behind it (like the page content) is completely hidden. If our page was a different background color (e.g. white), then we would adjust the loader’s background color accordingly.
  • The position is fixed so scrolling won’t affect it’s location on the page. Plus, the z-index is high enough that not other element should stack on top of it and block it from view.

This is what we should see so far when opening it up in the browser:

A circle loader that fades out into a black background.

Some light JavaScript handles the hiding

We’ve got a fancy spinner that covers the entire page, whether we’re viewing this on small or large screens. No we can write some logic to make it fade out after a certain amount of time. That’ll take a small dose of JavaScript.

First, let’s select the .preloader element we just styled up:

const preloader = document.querySelector('.preloader');

It would actually be a lot easier to add a class to the loader that sets its opacity to zero. However, it wouldn’t be as smooth as what we’re doing here, which is using a tiny helping of JavaScript to create a fadeOut function.

const fadeEffect = setInterval(() => {   // if we don't set opacity 1 in CSS, then   // it will be equaled to "" -- that's why   // we check it, and if so, set opacity to 1   if (!preloader.style.opacity) {     preloader.style.opacity = 1;   }   if (preloader.style.opacity > 0) {     preloader.style.opacity -= 0.1;   } else {     clearInterval(fadeEffect);   } }, 100);

💡 jQuery has a function that does this right out of the box. Leverage that if you’re already using jQuery in your project. Otherwise, rolling it with vanilla JavaScript is the way to go.

Let me explain the JavaScript a little bit. As the comment says, if our .preloader element doesn’t have the opacity property set, then it will be equal to empty ("") and we can set it to a value of 1 manually to make sure it displays when the document loads.

Once we know the opacity is set, then we set manipulate it. The whole function is wrapped in setInterval and we check if the opacity property every 100 milliseconds to see if it is greater than zero. As long as it is above zero, we decrease its value in 0.1 increment, which creates a smooth effect that fades the element out over time.

Once we hit zero opacity, we clearInterval to stop the script from running infinitely. Feel free to play around with timing and decreasing points to fit your needs.

The last thing that left to do is to call the function. We’ll call it when the window loads:

window.addEventListener('load', fadeEffect);

We are intentionally using the load event instead of DOMContentLoaded because the DOMContentLoaded event is fired when the document has been completely loaded and parsed. That means it doesn’t *wait for stylesheets, images, and subframes to finish loading* *before it executes*. The load event can be used to detect a fully-loaded page, and that is exactly what we are looking for. Otherwise, the function would start before our CSS and SVG are ready.

Drop some content into the HTML and try things out. Here’s the demo again:

See the Pen
Preloader with JavaScript FadeOut
by Maks Akymenko (@maximakymenko)
on CodePen.


Congratulations! You now know how to build a pretty nice loading effect using nothing but an image and a pinch of CSS and JavaScript. Enjoy!

The post Let’s Make a Fancy, but Uncomplicated Page Loader appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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