Tag: Exchanges

Weekly Platform News: Emoji String Length, Issues with Rounded Buttons, Bundled Exchanges

In this week’s roundup, the string length of two emojis is not always equal, something to consider before making that rounded button, and we may have a new way to share web apps between devices, even when they are offline.

The JavaScript string length of emoji characters

A single rendered emoji can have a JavaScript string length of up to 7 if it contains additional Unicode scalar values that represent a skin tone modifier, gender specification, and multicolor rendering.

(via Henri Sivonen)

An accessibility issue with rounded buttons

Be aware that applying CSS border-radius to a <button> element reduces the button’s interactive area (“those lost corner pixels are no longer clickable”).

You can avoid this accessibility issue in CSS, e.g., by emulating rounded corners via border-image instead, or by overlaying the button with an absolutely positioned, transparent ::before pseudo-element.

(via Tyler Sticka)

Sharing web pages while offline with Bundled Exchanges

Chrome plans to add support for navigation to Bundled Exchanges (part of Web Packaging). A bundled exchangeis a collection of HTTP request/response pairs, and it can be used to bundle a web page and all of its resources.

The browser should be able to parse and verify the bundle’s signature and then navigate to the website represented by the bundle without actually connecting to the site as all the necessary subresources could be served by the bundle.

Kinuko Yasuda from Google has posted a video that demonstrates how Bundled Exchanges enable sharing web pages (e.g., a web game) with other devices while offline.

(via Kinuko Yasuda)


Read even more news in my weekly Sunday issue, which can be delivered to you via email every Monday morning. Visit webplatform.news for more information.

The post Weekly Platform News: Emoji String Length, Issues with Rounded Buttons, Bundled Exchanges appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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Weekly Platform News: Feature Policy, Signed Exchanges, iOS browsers

👋 Hey folks! This is the first edition of a new weekly update we’ll be posting that covers timely news at the intersection of development standards and the tools that make them available on the web. We often talk about the pace of change in our industry. It’s fast and touches everything from the HTML, CSS and JavaScript we write to the landscape of browsers that renders them. Please help us welcome Šime Vidas, who will be keeping us all on the up and up with curated updates from his own blog of regular development updates, webplatform.news.

Feature Policy in Chrome

Andrew Betts: Websites can use the HTTP Feature-Policy response header to prevent third parties from secretly using powerful features such as geolocation, and to disable certain bad practices (e.g. document.write, parser-blocking JavaScript, un-optimized images).

This allows good practices to be more easily rewarded. … Search results could be badged with some approving “fast” logomark or (more controversially perhaps) get a higher result ranking if they disallow themselves certain policy-controlled behaviors.

Feature Policy is an emerging technology. See featurepolicy.info for more information about individual policies and their level of support in browsers.

Signed exchanges on Google Search

The mobile version of Google Search includes AMP results on search results pages. When the user taps on an AMP result, the AMP page loads from Google’s domain (google.com) and is displayed in the AMP Viewer.

Google Search now supports an alternative: If a website signs its AMP pages, and the visitor uses Chrome for Android, then tapping on an AMP result instead loads the signed version of the AMP page from Google’s servers, but to the user it appears as if they have navigated to the website normally.

The technology that enables this is called Signed HTTP Exchanges (SXG). See the announcement on Google Webmaster Central Blog for more details. The specification describes the following use case:

In order to speed up loading but still maintain control over its content, an HTML page in a particular origin “O.com” could tell clients to load its sub-resources from an intermediate content distributor that’s not authoritative, but require that those resources be signed by “O.com” so that the distributor couldn’t modify the resources.

Websites can add support for signed exchanges by running AMP Packager on the server side. Cloudflare has launched a free feature called “AMP Real URL” that fully automates the signing process for AMP pages served from its CDN.

Alternative iOS browsers

Henrik Joreteg: On iOS, several important APIs are limited to Safari and are not available in any of the alternative iOS browsers. These include service workers, web payments, and camera access.

Chrome for iOS supports web payments via a custom implementation. I’ve created a browser support table on HTML5test that highlights the differences between some of the popular iOS browsers.

The post Weekly Platform News: Feature Policy, Signed Exchanges, iOS browsers appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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