Tag: Easy

Easy Dark Mode (and Multiple Color Themes!) in React

I was working on a large React application for a startup, and aside from just wanting some good strategies to keep our styles organized, I wanted to give this whole “dark mode” thing a shot. With the huge ecosystem around React, you might think that there would be a go-to solution for style themes, but a little web searching shows that really isn’t the case.

There are plenty of different options out there, but many of them tie into very specific CSS strategies, like using CSS Modules, some form of CSS-in-JS, etc. I also found tools specific to certain frameworks, like Gatsby, but not a generic React project. What I was looking for was a basic system that’s easy to set up and work with without jumping through a ton of hoops; something fast, something easy to get a whole team of front-end and full-stack developers onboarded with quickly.

The existing solution I liked the best centered around using CSS variables and data attributes, found in this StackOverflow answer. But that also relied on some useRef stuff that felt hack-y. As they say in every infomercial ever, there’s got to be a better way!

Fortunately, there is. By combining that general CSS variable strategy with the beautiful useLocalStorage hook, we have a powerful, easy-to-use theming system. I’m going to walk through setting this thing up and running it, starting from a brand new React app. And if you stick around to the end, I also show you how to integrate it with react-scoped-css, which is what makes this my absolutely preferred way to work with CSS in React.

Project setup

Let’s pick this up at a very good place to start: the beginning.

This guide assumes a basic familiarity with CSS, JavaScript, and React.

First, make sure you have a recent version of Node and npm installed. Then navigate to whatever folder you want your project to live in, run git bash there (or your preferred command line tool), then run:

npx create-react-app easy-react-themes --template typescript

Swap out easy-react-themes with the name of your project, and feel free to leave off the --template typescript if you’d rather work in JavaScript. I happen to like TypeScript but it genuinely makes no difference for this guide, other than files ending in .ts/.tsx vs .js/.jsx.

Now we’ll open up our brand new project in a code editor. I’m using VS Code for this example, and if you are too, then you can run these commands:

cd easy-react-themes code .
Not much to look at yet, but we’ll change that!

Running npm start next starts your development server, and produces this in a new browser window:

And, finally, go ahead and install the use-local-storage package with:

npm i use-local-storage

And that’s it for the initial setup of the project!

Code setup

Open the App.tsx file and get rid of the stuff we don’t need.

We want to go from this…

…to this.

Delete the entire content in App.css:

Woot! Now let’s create our themes! Open up the index.css file and add this to it:

:root {   --background: white;   --text-primary: black;   --text-secondary: royalblue;   --accent: purple; } [data-theme='dark'] {   --background: black;   --text-primary: white;   --text-secondary: grey;   --accent: darkred; }

Here’s what we have so far:

See what we just did there? If you’re unfamiliar with CSS Custom Properties (as also known as CSS variables), they allow us to define a value to be used elsewhere in our stylesheets, with the pattern being --key: value. In this case, we’re only defining a few colors and applying them to the :root element so they can be used be used wherever else we need them across the whole React project.

The second part, starting with [data-theme='dark'], is where things get interesting. HTML (and JSX, which we’re using to create HTML in React) allows us to set completely arbitrary properties for our HTML elements with the data-* attribute. In this case, we are giving the outermost <div> element of our application a data-theme attribute and toggling its value between light and dark. When it’s dark, the CSS[data-theme='dark'] section overrides the variables we defined in the :root, so any styling which relies on those variables is toggled as well.

Let’s put that into practice. Back in App.tsx, let’s give React a way to track the theme state. We’d normally use something like useState for local state, or Redux for global state management, but we also want the user’s theme selection to stick around if they leave our app and come back later. While we could use Redux and redux-persist, that’s way overkill for our needs.

Instead, we’re using the useLocalStorage hook we installed earlier. It gives us a way to store things in local storage, as you might expect, but as a React hook, it maintains stateful knowledge of what it’s doing with localStorage, making our lives easy.

Some of you might be thinking “Oh no, what if the page renders before our JavaScript checks in with localStorage and we get the dreaded “flash of wrong theme?” But you don’t have to worry about that here since our React app is completely rendered client-side; the initial HTML file is basically a skeleton with a with a single <div> that React attaches the app to. All of the final HTML elements are generated by JavaScript after checking localStorage.

So, first, import the hook at the top of App.tsx with:

import useLocalStorage from 'use-local-storage'

Then, inside our App component, we use it with:

const defaultDark = window.matchMedia('(prefers-color-scheme: dark)').matches; const [theme, setTheme] = useLocalStorage('theme', defaultDark ? 'dark' : 'light'); 

This does a few things for us. First, we’re checking if the user has set a theme preference in their browser settings. Then we’re creating a stateful theme variable that is tied to localStorage and the setTheme function to update theme. useLocalStorage adds a key:value pair to localStorage if it doesn’t already exist, which defaults to theme: "light", unless our matchMedia check comes back as true, in which case it’s theme: "dark". That way, we’re gracefully handling both possibilities of keeping the theme settings for a returning user, or respecting their browser settings by default if we’re working with new users.

Next, we add a tiny bit of content to the App component so we have some elements to style, along with a button and function to actually allow us to toggle the theme.

The finished App.tsx file

The secret sauce is on line 14 where we’ve added data-theme={theme} to our top-level <div>. Now, by switching the value of theme, we are choosing whether or not to override the CSS variables in :root with the ones in the data-theme='dark' section of the index.css file.

The last thing we need to do is add some styling that uses those CSS variables we made earlier, and it’ll up and running! Open App.css and drop this CSS in there:

.App {   color: var(--text-primary);   background-color: var(--background);   font-size: large;   font-weight: bold;   padding: 20px;   height: calc(100vh - 40px);   transition: all .5s; } button {   color: var(--text-primary);   background-color: var(--background);   border: 2px var(--text-primary) solid;   float: right;   transition: all .5s; }

Now the background and text for the main <div>, and the background, text, and outline of the <button> rely on the CSS variables. That means when the theme changes, everything that depends on those variables update as well. Also note that we added transition: all .5s to both the App and <button> for a smooth transition between color themes.

Now, head back to the browser that’s running the app, and here’s what we get:

Tada! Let’s add another component just to show how the system works if we’re building out a real app. We’ll add a /components folder in /src, put a /square folder in /components, and add a Square.tsx and square.css, like so:

Let’s import it back into App.tsx, like so:

Here’s what we have now as a result:

And there we go! Obviously, this is a pretty basic case where we’re only using a default (light) theme, and a secondary (dark) theme. But if your application calls for it, this system could be used to implement multiple theme options. Personally, I’m thinking of giving my next project options for light, dark, chocolate, and strawberry—go nuts!

Bonus: Integrating with React Scoped CSS:

Using React Scoped CSS is my favorite way to keep each component’s CSS encapsulated to prevent name collision messiness and unintended style inheritance. My previous go-to for this was CSS Modules, but that has the downside of making the in-browser DOM look like a robot wrote all of the class names… because that’s exactly the case. This lack of human-readability makes debugging far more annoying than it has to be. Enter React Scoped CSS. We get to keep writing CSS (or Sass) exactly the way we have been, and the output looks like a human wrote it.

Seeing as the the React Scoped CSS repo provides full and detailed installation instructions, I’ll merely summarize them here.

First, install and configure Create React App Configuration Override (CRACO) according to their instructions. Craco is a tool that lets us override some of the default webpack configuration that’s bundled into create-react-app (CRA). Normally, if you want to adjust webpack in a CRA project, you first have to “eject” the project, which is an irreversible operation, and makes you fully responsible for all of the dependencies that are normally handled for you. You usually want to avoid ejecting unless you really, really know what you’re doing and have a good reason to go down that road. Instead, CRACO let’s us make some minor adjustments to our webpack config without things getting messy.

Once that’s done, install the React Scoped CSS package:

npm i craco-plugin-scoped-css

(The README instructions use yarn for installation instead of npm, but either is fine.) Now that it’s installed, simply rename the CSS files by adding .scoped before the .css, like so:

app.css -> app.scoped.css

And we need to make sure we’re using a new name when importing that CSS into a component:

import './app.css'; -> import './app.scoped.css';

Now all of the CSS is encapsulated so that it only applies to the components they’re imported into. It works by using data-* properties, much like our theme system, so when a scoped CSS file is imported into a component, all of that component’s elements are labeled with a property, like data-v-46ef2374, and the styles from that file are wrapped so that they only apply to elements with that exact data property.

That’s all wonderful, but the little trick to making that work with this theming system is that we explicitly don’t want the CSS variables encapsulated; we want them applied to the whole project. So, we simply don’t change index.css to have scoped in it… in other words, we can leave that CSS file alone. That’s it! Now we have a powerful theming system working in harmony with scoped CSS— we’re living the dream!

Thank you so much taking a read through this guide, and if it helped you build something awesome, I would love to know about it!


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AWS Lambdas: Easy, Easier, Easiest

I’d say cloud functions are one of the most transformative technologies in the last bunch of years. They are (usually) cheap, scale well, secure in their inherit isolation, and often written in JavaScript—comfortable territory for front-end developers. Nearly every cloud provider offers them, but AWS Lambda was the OG and remains the leader.

But also: The DX around cloud functions is just as interesting to watch as the tech behind the functions themselves. There is all sorts of tech that has sprung up around them to make them easy to use and relatively transparent. Emrah Samdan wrote that it’s a win-win for both customers and companies.

Two of the most popular Jamstack hosting platforms, Netlify and Vercel, offer idiot-proof wrappers for AWS Lambda deployments, each more developer-friendly than the next.

Joey Anuff, “AWS Lambdas: Easy, Easier, Easiest”

AWS’ own Amplify is a front-runner for easiness as well, which is in stark contrast to trying to manage your functions right through the AWS console itself.

Joey found Vercel to be easiest by a narrow margin, with the caveat that he was already using Next.js which is from Vercel.

My favorite bit here is that in the research repo for this article, Joey listed in great detail (with action GIFs) the steps for each of the services cloud functions offerings.

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink


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HTTPS is Easy!

I’ve been guilty of publicly bemoaning the complexity of HTTPS. In the past, I’ve purchased SSL certificates from third-party vendors and had trouble installing them. I’ve had certificates expire and had to scramble to fix them. I’ve had to poke and prod hosting companies to help me ensure things were going to renew correctly, and left unsatisfied.

But I’d say in the last few years, this has really chilled out. CSS-Tricks went HTTPS around five years ago, so we’re well past any struggles with insecure content or anything like that. These days my host (and sponsor) Flywheel makes it a flip of a switch in their admin, so it’s entirely no-brainer. The things I have on Netlify are automatically HTTPS. I also tend to put Cloudflare in front of everything, because of all the flip-switch security and performance things they offer, mostly for free. HTTPS is just getting a lot easier.

The name of this blog post is the name of this little microsite project from Troy Hunt: HTTPS is Easy! It’s a four-part series of five-minute videos walking through the process of adding enterprise-grade security to a site quickly and for free with Cloudflare. It almost feels like an ad for Cloudflare, and I could care less if it is, but Troy says:

[…] this isn’t a commercial activity on my behalf; Cloudflare didn’t engage me to create this and it’ll come as a surprise to them the first time they see it.

It really is easy and free, so I feel like I’m doing my duty here in making up for past complaints about HTTPS.

Part of what helps me feel more confident is minimizing the number of setups I have for different things. All my WordPress sites are on Flywheel — they aren’t scattered around, so I don’t have to learn multiple systems. All my deployment is through Buddy. All my domains are on a single registrant, so what I learn in managing one domain is useful for all of them. All my sites run through Cloudflare, so I feel confident in my management skills there. This kind of consolidation is good at keeping my stress levels low.

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“All these things are quite easy to do, they just need somebody to sit down and just go through the website”

I saw a video posted on Twitter from Channel 5 News in the UK (I have no idea what the credibility of them is, it’s an ocean away from me) with anchor Claudia Liza asking Glen Turner and Kristina Barrick questions about website accessibility.

Apparently, they often post videos with captions, but this particular video doesn’t (ironically). So, I’ve transcribed it here as I found them pretty well-spoken.

[Claudia Liza]: … you do have a visual impairment. How does that make it difficult for you to shop online?

[Glen Turner]: Well, I use various special features on my devices to shop online to make it easier. So, I enlarge the text, I’ll invert the colors to make the background dark so that I don’t have glare. I will zoom in on pictures, I will use speech to read things to me because it’s too difficult sometimes. But sometimes websites and apps aren’t designed in a way that is compatible with that. So sometimes the text will be poorly contrasted so you’ll have things like brown on black, or red on black, or yellow on white, something like that. Or the menu system won’t be very easy to navigate, or images won’t have descriptions for the visually impaired because images can have descriptions embedded that a speech reader will read back to them. So all these various factors make it difficult or impossible to shop on certain websites.

[Claudia Liza]: What do you need retailers to do? How do they need to change their technology on their websites and apps to make it easier?

It’s quite easy to do a lot of these things, really. Check the colors on your website. Make sure you’ve got light against dark and there is a very clear distinctive contrast. Make sure there are descriptions for the visually impaired. Make sure there are captions on videos for the hearing impaired. Make sure your menus are easy to navigate and make it easy to get around. All these things are quite easy to do, they just need somebody to sit down and just go through the website and check that it’s all right and consult disabled people as well. Ideally, you’ve got disabled people in your organization you employ, but consult the wider disabled community as well. There is loads of us online there is loads of us spread all over the country. There is 14 million of us you can talk to, so come and talk to us and say, “You know, is our website accessible for you? What can we do to improve it?” Then act on it when we give you our advice.

[Claudia Liza]: It makes sense doesn’t it, Glen? It sounds so simple. But Christina, it is a bit tricky for retailers. Why is that? What do other people with disabilities tell you?

So, we hear about content on websites being confusing in the way it’s written. There’s lots of information online about how to make an accessible website. There’s a global minimum legal standard called WCAG and there’s lot of resources online. Scope has their own which has loads of information on how to make your website accessible.

I think the problem really is generally lack of awareness. It doesn’t get spoken about a lot. I think that disabled consumers – there’s not a lot of places to complain. Sometimes they’ll go on a website and there isn’t even a way to contact that business to tell them that their website isn’t accessible. So what Scope is trying to do is raise the voices of disabled people. We have crowdsourced a lot of people’s feedback on where they experience inaccessible websites. We’re raising that profile and trying to get businesses to change.

[Claudia Liza]: So is it legal when retails aren’t making their websites accessible?

Yeah, so, under the Equality Act 2010, it’s not legal to create an inaccessible website, but what we’ve found is that government isn’t generally enforcing that as a law.

[Claudia Liza]: Glenn, do you feel confident that one day you’ll be able to buy whatever you want online?

I would certainly like to think that would be the case. As I say, you raise enough awareness and get the message out there and alert business to the fact that there is a huge consumer market among the disabled community, and we’ve got a 274 billion pound expenditure a year that we can give to them. Then if they are aware of that, then yeah, hopefully they will open their doors to us and let us spend our money with them.

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Finally, it Will Be Easy to Change the Color of List Bullets

In my germinating years, the general advice was this:

<ul>   <li><span>List item</span></li>   <!-- ... --> </ul>
li { color: red; } /* bullet */ li span (color: black; } /* text */

Not terrible, but not great. You’re “resetting” everything at the span level, so it gets more complicated the more you do.

Things are getting much easier. Let’s take a walk through this world getting more modern as we go.


An alternative was to rip off the default list styling and replace it with a pseudo-element.

ul {   list-style: none; }  li::before {   content: "• ";   color: red; }

If we need to count, we could do that with CSS counters.

ol {   list-style: none;   counter-reset: my-awesome-counter; }  ol li {   counter-increment: my-awesome-counter; }  ol li::before {   content: counter(my-awesome-counter) ". ";   color: red; }

Quick aside here: this doesn’t help with the color, but you can specify what character to use for the bullet by setting a string, like:

ul {   list-style-type: '✽ '; }

This is as of Firefox 39 (2015) and Chrome 79 (which comes out Dec 9, 2019).

For ordered lists, there is a ton of language-specific options. And those language styles work for CSS counters as well, which you can learn more about in Hui Jing’s deep dive.

See the Pen
Random CSS counters playground
by Chen Hui Jing (@huijing)
on CodePen.


But all the while, we only wanted to select the stupid bullet (or whatever it is) and style it. Now we are starting to be able to do just that.

As of Firefox 68 (July 2019), you can do like:

li::marker {   color: red;   content: "►"; }

…which, as you can see, changes the color and the bullet thing That is definitely the cleanest and easiest way to go, so it’s nice to see progress.

Tejas demonstrates:

See the Pen
::marker example
by Tejas (@tejask)
on CodePen.

Manuel Matuzović notes that if you set an element to a list-item display type, you can use markers on them as well.

h2 {   display: list-item; }  h2::marker {   color: orange;   content: "☞"; }

Even Safari has support at the time of this writing, so we should lean on Chrome here.

This browser support data is from Caniuse, which has more detail. A number indicates that browser supports the feature at that version and up.

Desktop

Chrome Opera Firefox IE Edge Safari
No No 68 No No 11.1

Mobile / Tablet

iOS Safari Opera Mobile Opera Mini Android Android Chrome Android Firefox
11.3-11.4 No No No No No

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