Tag: down

IE Down, Edge Up… Global Browser Usage Stats Are for Cocktail Parties and Conference Slides

I enjoy articles like Hartley Charlton’s “Microsoft Edge Looks Set to Overtake Safari as World’s Second Most Popular Desktop Browser.” It’s juicy! We know these massive players in the browser market care very much about their market share, so when one passes another it’s news. Like an Olympic speed skater favored for the gold getting a bronze instead, or the like.

Microsoft Edge is now used on 9.54 percent of desktops worldwide, a mere 0.3 percent behind Apple’s Safari, which stands at 9.84 percent. Google Chrome continues to hold first place with an overwhelming 65.38 percent of the market. Mozilla Firefox takes fourth place with 9.18 percent.

In January 2021, Safari held a 10.38 percent market share and appears to be gradually losing users to rival browsers over time. If the trend continues, Apple is likely to slip to third or fourth place in the near future.

Scoping the data down even by continent is entirely different. Like in Europe, Edge has already passed Safari, but in North America, the gap is still 5%.

Source: MacRumors.com

What does it matter to you or me? Nothing, I hope. These global stats should mean very little to us, outside a little casual nerdy cocktail party chatter. Please don’t make decisions about what to support and not support based on global statistics. Put some kind of basic analytics in place on your site, get data from actual visits, and make choices on that data. That’s the only data that matters.

Alan Dávalos’ “The baseline for web development in 2022” paints a picture of what we should be supporting based again on global browser usage statistics.

Globally, IE’s current market share is under 0.5%. And even in Japan, which has a higher market share of IE compared to other countries, IE’s market share is close to 2% and has a downward tendency.

Until now we kept supporting IE due to its market share. But now, there are basically no good reasons to keep supporting IE.

Again it seems so bizarre to me that any of us would make a choice on what to support based on a global usage statistic. Even when huge players make choices, they do it based on their own data. When Google “dropped” IE 11 (they still serve a perfectly fine baseline experience), they “did the math.” WordPress, famously powering somewhere in the “a third of the whole internet” range, factored in usage of their own product.

Even if you’re building a brand new product and trying to make these choices, you’ll have analytic data soon enough, and can make future-facing support choices based on that as it rolls in.


IE Down, Edge Up… Global Browser Usage Stats Are for Cocktail Parties and Conference Slides originally published on CSS-Tricks. You should get the newsletter.

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How do you make a layout with pictures down one side of a page matched up with paragraphs on the other side?

I got this exact question in an email the other day, and I thought it would make a nice blog post because of how wonderfully satisfying this is to do in CSS these days. Plus we can sprinkle in polish to it as we go.

HTML-wise, I’m thinking image, text, image, text, etc.

<img src="..." alt="..." height="" width="" /> <p>Text text text...</p>  <img src="..." alt="..." height="" width="" /> <p>Text text text...</p>  <img src="..." alt="..." height="" width="" /> <p>Text text text...</p>

If that was our entire body in an HTML document, the answer to the question in the blog post title is literally two lines of CSS:

body {   display: grid;   grid-template-columns: min-content 1fr; }

It’s going to look something like this…

Not pretty but we got the job done very quickly.

So cool. Thanks CSS. But let’s clean it up. Let’s make sure there is a gap, set the default type, and reign in the layout.

body {   display: grid;   padding: 2rem;   grid-template-columns: 300px 1fr;   gap: 1rem;   align-items: center;   max-width: 800px;   margin: 0 auto;   font: 500 100%/1.5 system-ui; } img {   max-width: 100%;   height: auto; }

I mean… ship it, right? Close, but maybe we can just add a quick mobile style.

@media (max-width: 650px) {   body {     display: block;     font-size: 80%;   }   p {     position: relative;     margin: -3rem 0 2rem 1rem;     padding: 1rem;     background: rgba(white, 0.8);   } }

OK, NOW ship it!


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Settling down in a Jamstack world

One of the things I like about Jamstack is that it’s just a philosophy. It’s not particularly prescriptive about how you go about it. To me, the only real requirement is that it’s based on static (CDN-backed) hosting. You can use whatever tooling you like. Those tools, though, tend to be somewhat new, and new sometimes comes with issues. Some pragmatism from Sean C Davis here:

I have two problems with solving problems using the newest, best tool every time a problem arises.

1. It’s simply not productive. Introducing new processes and tools takes time. Mastery and efficiency are built over time. If we’re trying to run a profitable business, we shouldn’t start from scratch every time.

2. We can’t know everything, all the time. With the rapidity at which we’re seeing new tools, there’s simply no way of knowing the best tool for the job because there’s no way to know all the tools available.

The trick is to settle into some tools you’ve proved that work and then keep using them to increase that level of expertise.

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“All these things are quite easy to do, they just need somebody to sit down and just go through the website”

I saw a video posted on Twitter from Channel 5 News in the UK (I have no idea what the credibility of them is, it’s an ocean away from me) with anchor Claudia Liza asking Glen Turner and Kristina Barrick questions about website accessibility.

Apparently, they often post videos with captions, but this particular video doesn’t (ironically). So, I’ve transcribed it here as I found them pretty well-spoken.

[Claudia Liza]: … you do have a visual impairment. How does that make it difficult for you to shop online?

[Glen Turner]: Well, I use various special features on my devices to shop online to make it easier. So, I enlarge the text, I’ll invert the colors to make the background dark so that I don’t have glare. I will zoom in on pictures, I will use speech to read things to me because it’s too difficult sometimes. But sometimes websites and apps aren’t designed in a way that is compatible with that. So sometimes the text will be poorly contrasted so you’ll have things like brown on black, or red on black, or yellow on white, something like that. Or the menu system won’t be very easy to navigate, or images won’t have descriptions for the visually impaired because images can have descriptions embedded that a speech reader will read back to them. So all these various factors make it difficult or impossible to shop on certain websites.

[Claudia Liza]: What do you need retailers to do? How do they need to change their technology on their websites and apps to make it easier?

It’s quite easy to do a lot of these things, really. Check the colors on your website. Make sure you’ve got light against dark and there is a very clear distinctive contrast. Make sure there are descriptions for the visually impaired. Make sure there are captions on videos for the hearing impaired. Make sure your menus are easy to navigate and make it easy to get around. All these things are quite easy to do, they just need somebody to sit down and just go through the website and check that it’s all right and consult disabled people as well. Ideally, you’ve got disabled people in your organization you employ, but consult the wider disabled community as well. There is loads of us online there is loads of us spread all over the country. There is 14 million of us you can talk to, so come and talk to us and say, “You know, is our website accessible for you? What can we do to improve it?” Then act on it when we give you our advice.

[Claudia Liza]: It makes sense doesn’t it, Glen? It sounds so simple. But Christina, it is a bit tricky for retailers. Why is that? What do other people with disabilities tell you?

So, we hear about content on websites being confusing in the way it’s written. There’s lots of information online about how to make an accessible website. There’s a global minimum legal standard called WCAG and there’s lot of resources online. Scope has their own which has loads of information on how to make your website accessible.

I think the problem really is generally lack of awareness. It doesn’t get spoken about a lot. I think that disabled consumers – there’s not a lot of places to complain. Sometimes they’ll go on a website and there isn’t even a way to contact that business to tell them that their website isn’t accessible. So what Scope is trying to do is raise the voices of disabled people. We have crowdsourced a lot of people’s feedback on where they experience inaccessible websites. We’re raising that profile and trying to get businesses to change.

[Claudia Liza]: So is it legal when retails aren’t making their websites accessible?

Yeah, so, under the Equality Act 2010, it’s not legal to create an inaccessible website, but what we’ve found is that government isn’t generally enforcing that as a law.

[Claudia Liza]: Glenn, do you feel confident that one day you’ll be able to buy whatever you want online?

I would certainly like to think that would be the case. As I say, you raise enough awareness and get the message out there and alert business to the fact that there is a huge consumer market among the disabled community, and we’ve got a 274 billion pound expenditure a year that we can give to them. Then if they are aware of that, then yeah, hopefully they will open their doors to us and let us spend our money with them.

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So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down

(This is a sponsored post.)

Who needs a project manager? You’re an organized person who can keep track of your own work, right?

Wrong.

Well, wrong if you’re part of a team. The thing about being self-organized is that it’s related to project management but not synonymous with it. Case in point: what happens if your project relies on someone else’s involvement? Sure you’re organized, but can you always say the same about your co-workers? Chances are you need something to keep everyone in sync so that a project stays on course.

That’s where you should consider trying monday.com.

monday.com is project management, but with a human touch. Sure, there’s task lists, assignments, milestones, due dates, and such like you would expect from any project management tool. That’s a given. That said, monday.com takes things up a notch by stripping away the barriers that prevent team members from collaborating with one another. For example, monday.com includes real-time messaging, file sharing, reporting, and a slew of other features that bridge the gaps between people and tasks so that everyone has purview into the progress of a project. Plus, it’s so pretty to look at.

There’s so much more than meets the eye because monday.com goes beyond project management. There’s resource management that ensures you have the right tools for a project, forecasting to affirm the prospect of a business opportunity, and even client management services. Seriously, your team and perhaps company can lean into monday.com and get a ton of use out of it.

You know what to do from here. Give monday.com a try. There’s a free trial and we’re sure you’ll find it to be so useful that you’ll want to stick with it well beyond.

Get Started

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So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down

(This is a sponsored post.)

Who needs a project manager? You’re an organized person who can keep track of your own work, right?

Wrong.

Well, wrong if you’re part of a team. The thing about being self-organized is that it’s related to project management but not synonymous with it. Case in point: what happens if your project relies on someone else’s involvement? Sure you’re organized, but can you always say the same about your co-workers? Chances are you need something to keep everyone in sync so that a project stays on course.

That’s where you should consider trying monday.com.

monday.com is project management, but with a human touch. Sure, there’s task lists, assignments, milestones, due dates, and such like you would expect from any project management tool. That’s a given. That said, monday.com takes things up a notch by stripping away the barriers that prevent team members from collaborating with one another. For example, monday.com includes real-time messaging, file sharing, reporting, and a slew of other features that bridge the gaps between people and tasks so that everyone has purview into the progress of a project. Plus, it’s so pretty to look at.

There’s so much more than meets the eye because monday.com goes beyond project management. There’s resource management that ensures you have the right tools for a project, forecasting to affirm the prospect of a business opportunity, and even client management services. Seriously, your team and perhaps company can lean into monday.com and get a ton of use out of it.

You know what to do from here. Give monday.com a try. There’s a free trial and we’re sure you’ll find it to be so useful that you’ll want to stick with it well beyond.

Get Started

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

The post So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , , , ,
[Top]

So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down

Who needs a project manager? You’re an organized person who can keep track of your own work, right?

Wrong.

Well, wrong if you’re part of a team. The thing about being self-organized is that it’s related to project management but not synonymous with it. Case in point: what happens if your project relies on someone else’s involvement? Sure you’re organized, but can you always say the same about your co-workers? Chances are you need something to keep everyone in sync so that a project stays on course.

That’s where you should consider trying monday.com.

monday.com is project management, but with a human touch. Sure, there’s task lists, assignments, milestones, due dates, and such like you would expect from any project management tool. That’s a given. That said, monday.com takes things up a notch by stripping away the barriers that prevent team members from collaborating with one another. For example, monday.com includes real-time messaging, file sharing, reporting, and a slew of other features that bridge the gaps between people and tasks so that everyone has purview into the progress of a project. Plus, it’s so pretty to look at.

There’s so much more than meets the eye because monday.com goes beyond project management. There’s resource management that ensures you have the right tools for a project, forecasting to affirm the prospect of a business opportunity, and even client management services. Seriously, your team and perhaps company can lean into monday.com and get a ton of use out of it.

You know what to do from here. Give monday.com a try. There’s a free 14-day trial and we’re sure you’ll find it to be so useful that you’ll want to stick with it well beyond.

Get Started

The post So, you think you’ve got project management nailed down appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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