Tag: cookies

Why every website wants you to accept its cookies

I’m probably in the minority on this, but I’ve never ever built one of those “This site uses cookies, here’s some kind of explanation of why, and please click this OK button to accept that” bars that feels like they are on half of the internet.

Emily Stewart:

Most of us just tediously click “yes” and move on. If you reject the cookie tracking, sometimes, the website won’t work. But most of the time, you can just keep browsing. They’re not too different from the annoying pop-up ads we all ignore when we’re online.

I’m extra-ignorant in that don’t even really get why they exist, despite being a professional web site builder.

Emily does a good job of rounding up the answer. It’s probably about what you think it is: a better safe than sorry play. Better annoy some users than get sued out of existence.

It’s also interesting that it’s not just one particular regulation that has people doing this. GDPR is a big one (despite being fairly light on mentions of cookies at all), but it’s really a couple of different regulations, including likely-upcoming ones, that have people implementing these obnoxious pop-ups.

I’m probably the weirdo that would rather get sued than show a fricking cookie banner.

Speaking of cookies though, and things that I’m ignorant about, I asked this question not long ago:

My brain didn’t have an answer at the time. If I was pressed on it, I’d probably answer that it’s just snake oil, and that those checkboxes don’t actually do anything.

From the thread, the answer seems to be that most sites use cookies to store your logged-in user session. Cookies have expiration dates. The “Remember me?” option makes the cookie have a longer expiration date than if you didn’t check it.

The whole thread there is pretty fun. Lots of useful things and lots more jokes. I’m on board with the idea that anytime you check that box, some server, somewhere, plays this.

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Weekly Platform News: Event Timing, Google Earth for Web, undead session cookies

Šime posts regular content for web developers on webplatform.news.

In this week’s news, Wikipedia helps identify three slow click handlers, Google Earth comes to the web, SVG properties in CSS get more support, and what to do in the event of zombie cookies.

Tracking down slow event handlers with Event Timing

Event Timing is experimentally available in Chrome (as an Origin Trial) and Wikipedia is taking part in the trial. This API can be used to accurately determine the duration of event handlers with the goal of surfacing slow events.

We quickly identified 3 very frequent slow click handlers experienced frequently by real users on Wikipedia. […] Two of those issues are caused by expensive JavaScript calls causing style recalculation and layout.

(via Gilles Dubuc)

Google Earth for Web beta available

The preview version of Google Earth for Web (powered by WebAssembly) is now available. You can try it out in Chromium-based browsers and Firefox — it runs single-threaded in browsers that don’t yet have (re-)enabled SharedArrayBuffer — but not in Safari because of its lack of full support for WebGL2.

(via Jordon Mears)

SVG geometry properties in CSS

Firefox Nightly has implemented SVG geometry properties (x, y, r, etc.) in CSS. This feature is already supported in Chrome and Safari and is expected to ship in Firefox 69 in September.

See the Pen
Animating SVG geometry properties with CSS
by Šime Vidas (@simevidas)
on CodePen.

(via Jérémie Patonnier)

Browsers can keep session cookies alive

Chrome and Firefox allow users to restore the previous browser session on startup. With this option enabled, closing the browser will not delete the user’s session cookies, nor empty the sessionStorage of web pages.

Given this session resumption behavior, it’s more important than ever to ensure that your site behaves reasonably upon receipt of an outdated session cookie (e.g. redirect the user to the login page instead of showing an error).

(via Eric Lawrence)

The post Weekly Platform News: Event Timing, Google Earth for Web, undead session cookies appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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Weekly Platform News: Event Timing, Google Earth for Web, undead session cookies

Šime posts regular content for web developers on webplatform.news.

In this week’s news, Wikipedia helps identify three slow click handlers, Google Earth comes to the web, SVG properties in CSS get more support, and what to do in the event of zombie cookies.

Tracking down slow event handlers with Event Timing

Event Timing is experimentally available in Chrome (as an Origin Trial) and Wikipedia is taking part in the trial. This API can be used to accurately determine the duration of event handlers with the goal of surfacing slow events.

We quickly identified 3 very frequent slow click handlers experienced frequently by real users on Wikipedia. […] Two of those issues are caused by expensive JavaScript calls causing style recalculation and layout.

(via Gilles Dubuc)

Google Earth for Web beta available

The preview version of Google Earth for Web (powered by WebAssembly) is now available. You can try it out in Chromium-based browsers and Firefox — it runs single-threaded in browsers that don’t yet have (re-)enabled SharedArrayBuffer — but not in Safari because of its lack of full support for WebGL2.

(via Jordon Mears)

SVG geometry properties in CSS

Firefox Nightly has implemented SVG geometry properties (x, y, r, etc.) in CSS. This feature is already supported in Chrome and Safari and is expected to ship in Firefox 69 in September.

See the Pen
Animating SVG geometry properties with CSS
by Šime Vidas (@simevidas)
on CodePen.

(via Jérémie Patonnier)

Browsers can keep session cookies alive

Chrome and Firefox allow users to restore the previous browser session on startup. With this option enabled, closing the browser will not delete the user’s session cookies, nor empty the sessionStorage of web pages.

Given this session resumption behavior, it’s more important than ever to ensure that your site behaves reasonably upon receipt of an outdated session cookie (e.g. redirect the user to the login page instead of showing an error).

(via Eric Lawrence)

The post Weekly Platform News: Event Timing, Google Earth for Web, undead session cookies appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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