Tag: Control

More Control Over CSS Borders With background-image

You can make a typical CSS border dashed or dotted. For example:

.box {    border: 1px dashed black;    border: 3px dotted red; }

You don’t have all that much control over how big or long the dashes or gaps are. And you certainly can’t give the dashes slants, fading, or animation! You can do those things with some trickery though.

Amit Sheen build this really neat Dashed Border Generator:

The trick is using four multiple backgrounds. The background property takes comma-separated values, so by setting four backgrounds (one along the top, right, bottom, and left) and sizing them to look like a border, it unlocks all this control.

So like:

.box {   background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(0deg, #333333, #333333 10px, transparent 10px, transparent 20px, #333333 20px), repeating-linear-gradient(90deg, #333333, #333333 10px, transparent 10px, transparent 20px, #333333 20px), repeating-linear-gradient(180deg, #333333, #333333 10px, transparent 10px, transparent 20px, #333333 20px), repeating-linear-gradient(270deg, #333333, #333333 10px, transparent 10px, transparent 20px, #333333 20px);   background-size: 3px 100%, 100% 3px, 3px 100% , 100% 3px;   background-position: 0 0, 0 0, 100% 0, 0 100%;   background-repeat: no-repeat; }

I like gumdrops.


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Get Programmatic Control of your Builds with Netlify Build Plugins

Today at Jamstack_Conf, Netlify announced Build Plugins. What it does is allow you to have particular hooks for events within your build, like when the build starts or ends. What’s nice about them is that they’re just a plain ‘ol JavaScript object, so you can insert some logic or kick off a library just the way you typically would within your application.

A “Build” is when you give your site to Netlify either via GitHub/GitLab/etc., or by literally just dropping the directory into the interface, Netlify will process all the assets, download and install packages, and generate a static version of the site to deploy to CDNs all around the world.

What the Build Plugin does is give you access to key points in time during that process, for instance, onPreBuild, onPostBuild, onSuccess, and so forth. You can execute some logic at those specific points in time, like this:

module.exports = {   onPreBuild: () => {     console.log('Hello world from onPreBuild event!')   }, }

You don’t only have to build them yourself, either! You can use build plugins that have been made by the community. There are very interesting ones, such as a11y, Cypress for testing, Inline Critical CSS, and my personal favorite, Subfont, which optimizes fonts for you in a really incredible way (you can watch a video about that).

Enable them through the dashboard through a few button clicks:

If you’d like to learn more, check out the announcement post here! Happy building!

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Building an accessible autocomplete control

Here’s a great in-depth post from Adam Silver about his journey to create an autocomplete field that’s as accessible as possible. There are so many edge cases to consider! There are old browsers and their peculiar quirks, there are accessibility best practices for screen readers, and not to mention dealing with the component design when there’s no JavaScript, etc.

Adam offers a warning before he begins:

[…] I’ve been looking at ways to let users enter a destination country. Unfortunately, native HTML form controls just aren’t good enough for this type of interaction. And so we need to build a custom autocomplete control from scratch. A word of warning though: this is one of the hardest UI components I’ve ever had to make—they’re just way harder than they look.

I also just bought Adam’s book, Form Design Patterns, and this post now makes me extra excited to read it.

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Control Icons with Font Size

Here’s a nifty trick from Andy Bell that now seems a little obvious in hindsight: if you set an SVG to have a width and height of 1em then you can change the size of it with the font-size property.

Try and change the font-size on the body element below to see the icon scale with the text:

See the Pen
Font size controlled icon
by Andy Bell (@andybelldesign)
on CodePen.

You pretty much always want your icons to be aligned with text so this trick helps by creating that inherent relationship in your code. Pretty nifty, eh?

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