Tag: Apple

Apple declined to implement 16 Web APIs in Safari due to privacy concerns

Why? Fingerprinting. Rather than these APIs being used for what they are meant for, they end up being used for gross ad tech. As in, “hey, we don’t know exactly who you are, but wait, through a script we can tell your phone stopped being idle from 8:00 am to 8:13 am and were near the Bluetooth device JBL BATHROOM, so it’s probably dad taking his morning poop! Let’s show him some ads for nicer speakers and flannel shirts ASAP.”

I’ll pull the complete list here from Catalin Cimpanu’s article:

  • Web Bluetooth – Allows websites to connect to nearby Bluetooth LE devices.
  • Web MIDI API – Allows websites to enumerate, manipulate and access MIDI devices.
  • Magnetometer API – Allows websites to access data about the local magnetic field around a user, as detected by the device’s primary magnetometer sensor.
  • Web NFC API – Allows websites to communicate with NFC tags through a device’s NFC reader.
  • Device Memory API – Allows websites to receive the approximate amount of device memory in gigabytes.
  • Network Information API – Provides information about the connection a device is using to communicate with the network and provides a means for scripts to be notified if the connection type changes
  • Battery Status API – Allows websites to receive information about the battery status of the hosting device.
  • Web Bluetooth Scanning – Allows websites to scan for nearby Bluetooth LE devices.
  • Ambient Light Sensor – Lets websites get the current light level or illuminance of the ambient light around the hosting device via the device’s native sensors.
  • HDCP Policy Check extension for EME – Allows websites to check for HDCP policies, used in media streaming/playback.
  • Proximity Sensor – Allows websites to retrieve data about the distance between a device and an object, as measured by a proximity sensor.
  • WebHID – Allows websites to retrieve information about locally connected Human Interface Device (HID) devices.
  • Serial API – Allows websites to write and read data from serial interfaces, used by devices such as microcontrollers, 3D printers, and othes.
  • Web USB – Lets websites communicate with devices via USB (Universal Serial Bus).
  • Geolocation Sensor (background geolocation) – A more modern version of the older Geolocation API that lets websites access geolocation data.
  • User Idle Detection – Lets website know when a user is idle.

I’m of mixing feelings. I do like the idea of the web being a competitive platform for building any sort of app and sometimes fancy APIs like this open those doors.

Not to mention that some of these APIs are designed to do responsible things, like knowing connections speeds through the Network Information API and sending less data if you can, and the same for the Battery Status API.

This is all a similar situation to :visited in CSS. Have you ever noticed how there are some CSS declarations you can’t use on visited links? JavaScript APIs will even literally lie about the current styling of visited links to make links always appear unvisited. Because fingerprinting.

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink


The post Apple declined to implement 16 Web APIs in Safari due to privacy concerns appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

You can support CSS-Tricks by being an MVP Supporter.

CSS-Tricks

, , , , , ,

Let’s Make One of Those Fancy Scrolling Animations Used on Apple Product Pages

Apple is well-known for the sleek animations on their product pages. For example, as you scroll down the page products may slide into view, MacBooks fold open and iPhones spin, all while showing off the hardware, demonstrating the software and telling interactive stories of how the products are used.

Just check out this video of the mobile web experience for the iPad Pro:

Source: Twitter

A lot of the effects that you see there aren’t created in just HTML and CSS. What then, you ask? Well, it can be a little hard to figure out. Even using the browser’s DevTools won’t always reveal the answer, as it often can’t see past a <canvas> element.

Let’s take an in-depth look at one of these effects to see how it’s made so you can recreate some of these magical effects in our own projects. Specifically, let’s replicate the AirPods Pro product page and the shifting light effect in the hero image.

The basic concept

The idea is to create an animation just like a sequence of images in rapid succession. You know, like a flip book! No complex WebGL scenes or advanced JavaScript libraries are needed.

By synchronizing each frame to the user’s scroll position, we can play the animation as the user scrolls down (or back up) the page.

Start with the markup and styles

The HTML and CSS for this effect is very easy as the magic happens inside the <canvas> element which we control with JavaScript by giving it an ID.

In CSS, we’ll give our document a height of 100vh and make our <body> 5⨉ taller than that to give ourselves the necessary scroll length to make this work. We’ll also match the background color of the document with the background color of our images.

The last thing we’ll do is position the <canvas>, center it, and limit the max-width and height so it does not exceed the dimensions of the viewport.

html {   height: 100vh; } 
 body {   background: #000;   height: 500vh; } 
 canvas {   position: fixed;   left: 50%;   top: 50%;   max-height: 100vh;   max-width: 100vw;   transform: translate(-50%, -50%); }

Right now, we are able to scroll down the page (even though the content does not exceed the viewport height) and our <canvas> stays at the top of the viewport. That’s all the HTML and CSS we need.

Let’s move on to loading the images.

Fetching the correct images

Since we’ll be working with an image sequence (again, like a flip book), we’ll assume the file names are numbered sequentially in ascending order (i.e. 0001.jpg, 0002.jpg, 0003.jpg, etc.) in the same directory.

We’ll write a function that returns the file path with the number of the image file we want, based off of the user’s scroll position.

const currentFrame = index => (   `https://www.apple.com/105/media/us/airpods-pro/2019/1299e2f5_9206_4470_b28e_08307a42f19b/anim/sequence/large/01-hero-lightpass/$ {index.toString().padStart(4, '0')}.jpg` )

Since the image number is an integer, we’ll need to turn it in to a string and use padStart(4, '0') to prepend zeros in front of our index until we reach four digits to match our file names. So, for example, passing 1 into this function will return 0001.

That gives us a way to handle image paths. Here’s the first image in the sequence drawn on the <canvas> element:

As you can see, the first image is on the page. At this point, it’s just a static file. What we want is to update it based on the user’s scroll position. And we don’t merely want to load one image file and then swap it out by loading another image file. We want to draw the images on the <canvas> and update the drawing with the next image in the sequence (but we’ll get to that in just a bit).

We already made the function to generate the image filepath based on the number we pass into it so what we need to do now is track the user’s scroll position and determine the corresponding image frame for that scroll position.

Connecting images to the user’s scroll progress

To know which number we need to pass (and thus which image to load) in the sequence, we need to calculate the user’s scroll progress. We’ll make an event listener to track that and handle some math to calculate which image to load.

We need to know:

  • Where scrolling starts and ends
  • The user’s scroll progress (i.e. a percentage of how far the user is down the page)
  • The image that corresponds to the user’s scroll progress

We’ll use scrollTop to get the vertical scroll position of the element, which in our case happens to be the top of the document. That will serve as the starting point value. We’ll get the end (or maximum) value by subtracting the window height from the document scroll height. From there, we’ll divide the scrollTop value by the maximum value the user can scroll down, which gives us the user’s scroll progress.

Then we need to turn that scroll progress into an index number that corresponds with the image numbering sequence for us to return the correct image for that position. We can do this by multiplying the progress number by the number of frames (images) we have. We’ll use Math.floor() to round that number down and wrap it in Math.min() with our maximum frame count so it never exceeds the total number of frames.

window.addEventListener('scroll', () => {     const scrollTop = html.scrollTop;   const maxScrollTop = html.scrollHeight - window.innerHeight;   const scrollFraction = scrollTop / maxScrollTop;   const frameIndex = Math.min(     frameCount - 1,     Math.floor(scrollFraction * frameCount)   ); });

Updating <canvas> with the correct image

We now know which image we need to draw as the user’s scroll progress changes. This is where the magic of  <canvas> comes into play. <canvas> has many cool features for building everything from games and animations to design mockup generators and everything in between!

One of those features is a method called requestAnimationFrame that works with the browser to update <canvas> in a way we couldn’t do if we were working with straight image files instead. This is why I went with a <canvas> approach instead of, say, an <img> element or a <div> with a background image.

requestAnimationFrame will match the browser refresh rate and enable hardware acceleration by using WebGL to render it using the device’s video card or integrated graphics. In other words, we’ll get super smooth transitions between frames — no image flashes!

Let’s call this function in our scroll event listener to swap images as the user scrolls up or down the page. requestAnimationFrame takes a callback argument, so we’ll pass a function that will update the image source and draw the new image on the <canvas>:

requestAnimationFrame(() => updateImage(frameIndex + 1))

We’re bumping up the frameIndex by 1 because, while the image sequence starts at 0001.jpg, our scroll progress calculation starts actually starts at 0. This ensures that the two values are always aligned.

The callback function we pass to update the image looks like this:

const updateImage = index => {   img.src = currentFrame(index);   context.drawImage(img, 0, 0); }

We pass the frameIndex into the function. That sets the image source with the next image in the sequence, which is drawn on our <canvas> element.

Even better with image preloading

We’re technically done at this point. But, come on, we can do better! For example, scrolling quickly results in a little lag between image frames. That’s because every new image sends off a new network request, requiring a new download.

We should try preloading the images new network requests. That way, each frame is already downloaded, making the transitions that much faster, and the animation that much smoother!

All we’ve gotta do is loop through the entire sequence of images and load ‘em up:

const frameCount = 148; 
 const preloadImages = () => {   for (let i = 1; i < frameCount; i++) {     const img = new Image();     img.src = currentFrame(i);   } }; 
 preloadImages();

Demo!

A quick note on performance

While this effect is pretty slick, it’s also a lot of images. 148 to be exact.

No matter much we optimize the images, or how speedy the CDN is that serves them, loading hundreds of images will always result in a bloated page. Let’s say we have multiple instances of this on the same page. We might get performance stats like this:

1,609 requests, 55.8 megabytes transferred, 57.5 megabytes resources, load time of 30.45 seconds.

That might be fine for a high-speed internet connection without tight data caps, but we can’t say the same for users without such luxuries. It’s a tricky balance to strike, but we have to be mindful of everyone’s experience — and how our decisions affect them.

A few things we can do to help strike that balance include:

  • Loading a single fallback image instead of the entire image sequence
  • Creating sequences that use smaller image files for certain devices
  • Allowing the user to enable the sequence, perhaps with a button that starts and stops the sequence

Apple employs the first option. If you load the AirPods Pro page on a mobile device connected to a slow 3G connection and, hey, the performance stats start to look a whole lot better:

8 out of 111 requests, 347 kilobytes of 2.6 megabytes transferred, 1.4 megabytes of 4.5 megabytes resources, load time of one minute and one second.

Yeah, it’s still a heavy page. But it’s a lot lighter than what we’d get without any performance considerations at all. That’s how Apple is able to get get so many complex sequences onto a single page.


Further reading

If you are interested in how these image sequences are generated, a good place to start is the Lottie library by AirBnB. The docs take you through the basics of generating animations with After Effects while providing an easy way to include them in projects.

The post Let’s Make One of Those Fancy Scrolling Animations Used on Apple Product Pages appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

, , , , , , , ,
[Top]