Tag: Angular

Angular + Jamstack! (Free Webinar)

(This is a sponsored post.)

It’s easy to think that working with Jamstack means working with some specific set of technologies. That’s how it’s traditionally been packaged for us. Think LAMP stack, where Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP are explicit tools and languages. or MEAN or MERN or whatever. With Jamstack, the original JAM meant JavaScript, APIs, and Markup. That’s not specific technologies so much as a loose philosophy.

That’s cool, because it means we can bring our own set of favorite technologies, and then figure out how to use that philosophy for the most benefit. That can mean bringing our favorite CMS, favorite build tools, and even favorite front-end frameworks.

That’s the crux of Netlify’s upcoming webinar on using Angular in the Jamstack. They’ll walk through where Angular fits into the Jamstack architecture, how to develop with Angular in the stack, and the benefits of working this way. Plus you get to hang with Tara Z. Manicsic, which is worth it right there.

The webinar is free and scheduled for May 13 at 9:00am Pacific Time.

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Create a Static Site Using Angular & Scully

The team at HeroDevs has just released the alpha version of Scully, a static site generator for Angular. That’s right, Angular didn’t have an intuitive way to create JAMstack applications before, but now it’s possible!

Scully uses a node CLI application to run Angular schematics so you don’t have to learn any new language or syntax. You can see your static files in a new dist folder called static alongside your application folder.

To watch the full setup, Tara Manicsic went through the process of setting it up on a Learn with Jason Twitch stream. You can check it out here if you want to get started.

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Angular, Autoprefixer, IE11, and CSS Grid Walk into a Bar…

I am attracted to the idea that you shouldn’t care how the code you author ends up in the browser. It’s already minified. It’s already gzipped. It’s already transmogrified (real word!) by things that polyfill it, things that convert it into code that older browsers understand, things that make it run faster, things that strip away unused bits, and things that break it into chunks by technology far above my head.

The trend is that the code we author is farther and farther away from the code we write, and like I said, I’m attracted to that idea because generally, the purpose of that is to make websites faster for users.

But as Dave notes, when something goes wrong…

As toolchains grow and become more complex, unless you are expertly familiar with them, it’s very unclear what transformations are happening in our code. Tracking the differences between the input and output and the processes that code underwent can be overwhelming. When there’s a problem, it’s increasingly difficult to hop into the assembly line and diagnose the issue and often there’s not an precise fix.

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