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How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally

I use Notion quite a bit, both personally and professionally.

In a sense, it’s just an app for keeping documents in one place: little notes, to-do lists, basic spreadsheets, etc. I like the native macOS Notes app just fine. It’s quick and easy, it’s desktop and mobile, it syncs… but there are enough limitations that I wanted something better. Plus, I wanted something team-based and web-friendly (shared URLs!) and Notion hits those nails on the head.

Here’s a bunch of ways to use Notion as well as some scattered random notes and ideas about it.

Workspaces are your teams

The word “workspace” almost makes it seem like you could or should use them as your top-level organization structure within a team. Like different projects would use different workspaces. But I’d say: don’t do that. Workspaces are teams, even if it’s a party of you and only you.

Pricing is billed by workspace. Team members are organized by workspace. Search is scoped by workspace. Switching workspaces isn’t too difficult, but it’s not lightning fast, either. I’d say it’s worth honoring those walls and keeping workspaces to a minimum. It’s almost like Slack. It’s easy to get Too-Many-Slack’d, so best to avoid getting Too-Many-Notion’d.

Meeting notes

We have a weekly all-hands meeting at CodePen where we lay out what we’ve done and what we’re going to do. It’s nice to have that as a document so it can include links, notes, comments, embeds, etc.

Those notes don’t disappear next week — we archive them as a historical record of everything we do.

Publishing and advertising schedules

I like looking at a spreadsheet-like document to see upcoming CSS-
Tricks articles with their statuses:

But that same exact document can be viewed as a calendar as well, if that’s easier to look at:

There can be all sorts of views for the same table of content, which is a terrific feature:

Knowledge bases

This might be the easiest selling point for Notion. I’m sure a lot of companies have a whole bunch of documents that get into how the company works, including employee databases, coding guidelines, deployment procedures, dashboards to other software, etc. Sometimes that works as a wiki, but I’ve never seen a lovely setup for this kind of thing. Notion works fantastically as a collaborative knowledge base.

Public documents

I can make a document public, and even open it to public comments with the flip of a switch.

Another super fun thing in Notion is applying a header image and emoji, which gives each document a lot of personality. It’s done in a way that can’t really be screwed up and made into a gross-looking document. Here’s an example where I’ve customized the page header — and look at the public URL!

I’ve also used that for job postings:

It’s also great for things like public accessibility audits where people can be sent to a public page to see what kinds of things are being worked on with the ability to comment on items.

Quick, collaborative documents

Any document can be shared. I can create a quick document and share it with a particular person easily. That could be a private document shared only with team members, or with someone totally outside the team. Or I can make the document publicly visible to all.

I use Notion to create pages to present possibilities with potential sponsorship partners, then morph that into a document to keep track of everything we’re doing together.

We use a show calendar for ShopTalk episodes. Each show added to the calendar automatically creates a page that we use as collaborative show notes with our guests.

It’s worth noting that a Notion account is required to edit a document. So anyone that’s invited will have to register and be logged in. Plus, you’ll need to share it with the correct email address so that person can associate their account with that address.

Blog post drafts

I’ve been trying to keep all my blog post drafts in Notion. That way, they can easily be shared individually and I can browse all the collected ideas at once.

Exporting posts come out as Markdown too, and that’s great for blog post drafts because it translates nicely:

Private sub-team documents

Being able to share documents with specific people is great. For example, we have a Founder’s Meetings section on CodePen:

There are probably a million more things

Notion is simply documents with interesting blocks. Simple, but brilliant. For me, it can replace and consolidate things like Trello and other kanban tools, lightweight project management platforms, GitHub issues (if you don’t need the public-ness), wikis, Google Docs and Spreadsheets, and even simple one-off public websites.

Here’s a website dedicated to other people’s interesting Notion pages.

What I want from Notion

I’d love to see Notion’s web app links open in their desktop app instead of the web. I prefer the app because I have plenty of browser tabs open as it is. It’s gotta be possible to do this with a browser extension. There used to be “Paws” for Trello and there was a browser extension that would open Trello links in that app, so there is prior precedent out there.

I’d also like Notion to explore a tabs feature. I constantly need more than one document open at a time and right now the only way to do that is with multiple windows. There is some back-and-forth arrow action that’s possible, but it would be interesting to see native tabs or native window splitting somehow.

I’d love to see some performance upgrades too. It’s not terribly bad, but working in Notion is so ubiquitous and important in my day-to-day that I’d love for it to feel more instantaneous than it currently does.

The post How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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Create Smart WordPress Forms in Less Than 5 Minutes with WPForms

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The post Create Smart WordPress Forms in Less Than 5 Minutes with WPForms appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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2019 CSS Wishlist

What do you wish CSS could do natively that it can’t do now? First, let’s review the last time we did this in 2013.

  1. ❌ “I’d like to be able to select an element based on if it contains another particular selector”
  2. ❌ “I’d like to be able to select an element based on the content it contains”
  3. ❌ “I’d like multiple pseudo elements”
  4. ❌ “I’d like to be able to animate/transition something to height: auto;
  5. ❌ “I’d like things from Sass, like @extend, @mixin, and nesting”
  6. ❌ “I’d like ::nth-letter, ::nth-word, etc”
  7. ✅ “I’d like all the major browsers to auto-update”

Ouch. Oh well. I’m not sure how hotly requested all those actually are or how feasible it is to even implement them. They’re merely ideas that I thought we be useful in 2013, and as it turns out, I still do.

This time, instead of me making my own list, let’s have a gander around the internet at other people who have rounded up CSS desires.

TL;DR List

In observing several sources of conversation around things people desire in CSS, these seem like the most common asks:

  • Parent queries. As in, selecting an element any-which-way, then selecting the parent of that element. We have some proof it’s possible with :focus-within.
  • Container queries. Select a particular element when the element itself is under certain conditions.
  • Standardized styling of form elements.
  • Has/Contains Selectors.
  • Transitions to auto dimensions.
  • Fixed up handling of viewport units.

Notably, what’s interesting to me is the lack of people asking for style scoping. It came up a little, but not a ton. It seems like such a big part of the CSS-in-JS conversation, so I’m surprised to see so little mention of it in the context of general “what does CSS need?” conversations.

Jen Simmons asked what’s on our lists

Notable replies from the thread:

  • Aspect ratios (it’s weirdly tricky in CSS, coming to HTML probably, and maybe we’ll get it natively in CSS with a property someday)
  • Exclusions
  • Regions
  • Subgrid (it’s coming!)
  • text-wrap: avoid-widows-and-orphans
  • Nesting
  • Outline with radius
  • Animated background gradients (without faking it by moving them or whatever else)
  • text-overflow:ellipsis over multiple lines / line clamping</li>
    <li>0-to-auto transitions</li>
    <li>Parent selectors</li>
    <li>Async <code>@import
  • Math functions like sqrt(), sin() and cos()
  • font-min-size and font-max-size
  • Masonry

Tab Atkins wanted to know what parts of CSS give us the most trouble

Notable replies from the thread:

  • Tons and tons of requests for a standardized way to style form elements — not just for styling desire, but for accessibility to prevent trading standards for styling.
  • Being able to test browser support of more than just property/values with @supports
  • Improved handling of viewport units and their relationship to other browser UI
  • Improved handling of multi-column layout handling
  • Elastic scrolling

Tommy Hodgins did a CSS+JS advent calendar on Twitter that documents interesting possibilities

Tommy’s list:

  • Parent selector
  • Has selector
  • Closest selector
  • First in document (like how querySelector works)
  • Elder sibling selector
  • Previous sibling selector
  • Contains selector
  • Regex selector
  • Computed style selector
  • :nth-letter / :nth-word
  • Media pseudo selectors
  • Not-blank valid/invalid selector
  • Element queries
  • Attribute comparison selectors
  • Custom specificity
  • Visibility selectors
  • Overflow detection selector
  • User agent detection selector
  • Storage queries
  • Date queries
  • Protocol queries
  • Deep hover

We asked as well

Notable replies from the thread:

  • Container queries
  • Has selector
  • Regions
  • Color modification functions
  • Nesting
  • Shaders
  • Transition to auto dimensions / transition from display: none;
  • Previous sibling selector
  • font-size: fit;
  • Styling grid-template-areas
  • Animation between grid-template-areas
  • Types for custom properties
  • clip-path accepting paths
  • inline-styles: ignore;
  • Aspect ratios
  • Scoping
  • // single line comments
  • Corner shapes

The post 2019 CSS Wishlist appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally

I use Notion quite a bit, both personally and professionally.

In a sense, it’s just an app for keeping documents in one place: little notes, to-do lists, basic spreadsheets, etc. I like the native macOS Notes app just fine. It’s quick and easy, it’s desktop and mobile, it syncs… but there are enough limitations that I wanted something better. Plus, I wanted something team-based and web-friendly (shared URLs!) and Notion hits those nails on the head.

Here’s a bunch of ways to use Notion as well as some scattered random notes and ideas about it.

Workspaces are your teams

The word “workspace” almost makes it seem like you could or should use them as your top-level organization structure within a team. Like different projects would use different workspaces. But I’d say: don’t do that. Workspaces are teams, even if it’s a party of you and only you.

Pricing is billed by workspace. Team members are organized by workspace. Search is scoped by workspace. Switching workspaces isn’t too difficult, but it’s not lightning fast, either. I’d say it’s worth honoring those walls and keeping workspaces to a minimum. It’s almost like Slack. It’s easy to get Too-Many-Slack’d, so best to avoid getting Too-Many-Notion’d.

Meeting notes

We have a weekly all-hands meeting at CodePen where we lay out what we’ve done and what we’re going to do. It’s nice to have that as a document so it can include links, notes, comments, embeds, etc.

Those notes don’t disappear next week — we archive them as a historical record of everything we do.

Publishing and advertising schedules

I like looking at a spreadsheet-like document to see upcoming CSS-
Tricks articles with their statuses:

But that same exact document can be viewed as a calendar as well, if that’s easier to look at:

There can be all sorts of views for the same table of content, which is a terrific feature:

Knowledge bases

This might be the easiest selling point for Notion. I’m sure a lot of companies have a whole bunch of documents that get into how the company works, including employee databases, coding guidelines, deployment procedures, dashboards to other software, etc. Sometimes that works as a wiki, but I’ve never seen a lovely setup for this kind of thing. Notion works fantastically as a collaborative knowledge base.

Public documents

I can make a document public, and even open it to public comments with the flip of a switch.

Another super fun thing in Notion is applying a header image and emoji, which gives each document a lot of personality. It’s done in a way that can’t really be screwed up and made into a gross-looking document. Here’s an example where I’ve customized the page header — and look at the public URL!

I’ve also used that for job postings:

It’s also great for things like public accessibility audits where people can be sent to a public page to see what kinds of things are being worked on with the ability to comment on items.

Quick, collaborative documents

Any document can be shared. I can create a quick document and share it with a particular person easily. That could be a private document shared only with team members, or with someone totally outside the team. Or I can make the document publicly visible to all.

I use Notion to create pages to present possibilities with potential sponsorship partners, then morph that into a document to keep track of everything we’re doing together.

We use a show calendar for ShopTalk episodes. Each show added to the calendar automatically creates a page that we use as collaborative show notes with our guests.

It’s worth noting that a Notion account is required to edit a document. So anyone that’s invited will have to register and be logged in. Plus, you’ll need to share it with the correct email address so that person can associate their account with that address.

Blog post drafts

I’ve been trying to keep all my blog post drafts in Notion. That way, they can easily be shared individually and I can browse all the collected ideas at once.

Exporting posts come out as Markdown too, and that’s great for blog post drafts because it translates nicely:

Private sub-team documents

Being able to share documents with specific people is great. For example, we have a Founder’s Meetings section on CodePen:

There are probably a million more things

Notion is simply documents with interesting blocks. Simple, but brilliant. For me, it can replace and consolidate things like Trello and other kanban tools, lightweight project management platforms, GitHub issues (if you don’t need the public-ness), wikis, Google Docs and Spreadsheets, and even simple one-off public websites.

Here’s a website dedicated to other people’s interesting Notion pages.

What I want from Notion

I’d love to see Notion’s web app links open in their desktop app instead of the web. I prefer the app because I have plenty of browser tabs open as it is. It’s gotta be possible to do this with a browser extension. There used to be “Paws” for Trello and there was a browser extension that would open Trello links in that app, so there is prior precedent out there.

I’d also like Notion to explore a tabs feature. I constantly need more than one document open at a time and right now the only way to do that is with multiple windows. There is some back-and-forth arrow action that’s possible, but it would be interesting to see native tabs or native window splitting somehow.

I’d love to see some performance upgrades too. It’s not terribly bad, but working in Notion is so ubiquitous and important in my day-to-day that I’d love for it to feel more instantaneous than it currently does.

The post How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

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How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally

I use Notion quite a bit, both personally and professionally.

In a sense, it’s just an app for keeping documents in one place: little notes, to-do lists, basic spreadsheets, etc. I like the native macOS Notes app just fine. It’s quick and easy, it’s desktop and mobile, it syncs… but there are enough limitations that I wanted something better. Plus, I wanted something team-based and web-friendly (shared URLs!) and Notion hits those nails on the head.

Here’s a bunch of ways to use Notion as well as some scattered random notes and ideas about it.

Workspaces are your teams

The word “workspace” almost makes it seem like you could or should use them as your top-level organization structure within a team. Like different projects would use different workspaces. But I’d say: don’t do that. Workspaces are teams, even if it’s a party of you and only you.

Pricing is billed by workspace. Team members are organized by workspace. Search is scoped by workspace. Switching workspaces isn’t too difficult, but it’s not lightning fast, either. I’d say it’s worth honoring those walls and keeping workspaces to a minimum. It’s almost like Slack. It’s easy to get Too-Many-Slack’d, so best to avoid getting Too-Many-Notion’d.

Meeting notes

We have a weekly all-hands meeting at CodePen where we lay out what we’ve done and what we’re going to do. It’s nice to have that as a document so it can include links, notes, comments, embeds, etc.

Those notes don’t disappear next week — we archive them as a historical record of everything we do.

Publishing and advertising schedules

I like looking at a spreadsheet-like document to see upcoming CSS-
Tricks articles with their statuses:

But that same exact document can be viewed as a calendar as well, if that’s easier to look at:

There can be all sorts of views for the same table of content, which is a terrific feature:

Knowledge bases

This might be the easiest selling point for Notion. I’m sure a lot of companies have a whole bunch of documents that get into how the company works, including employee databases, coding guidelines, deployment procedures, dashboards to other software, etc. Sometimes that works as a wiki, but I’ve never seen a lovely setup for this kind of thing. Notion works fantastically as a collaborative knowledge base.

Public documents

I can make a document public, and even open it to public comments with the flip of a switch.

Another super fun thing in Notion is applying a header image and emoji, which gives each document a lot of personality. It’s done in a way that can’t really be screwed up and made into a gross-looking document. Here’s an example where I’ve customized the page header — and look at the public URL!

I’ve also used that for job postings:

It’s also great for things like public accessibility audits where people can be sent to a public page to see what kinds of things are being worked on with the ability to comment on items.

Quick, collaborative documents

Any document can be shared. I can create a quick document and share it with a particular person easily. That could be a private document shared only with team members, or with someone totally outside the team. Or I can make the document publicly visible to all.

I use Notion to create pages to present possibilities with potential sponsorship partners, then morph that into a document to keep track of everything we’re doing together.

We use a show calendar for ShopTalk episodes. Each show added to the calendar automatically creates a page that we use as collaborative show notes with our guests.

It’s worth noting that a Notion account is required to edit a document. So anyone that’s invited will have to register and be logged in. Plus, you’ll need to share it with the correct email address so that person can associate their account with that address.

Blog post drafts

I’ve been trying to keep all my blog post drafts in Notion. That way, they can easily be shared individually and I can browse all the collected ideas at once.

Exporting posts come out as Markdown too, and that’s great for blog post drafts because it translates nicely:

Private sub-team documents

Being able to share documents with specific people is great. For example, we have a Founder’s Meetings section on CodePen:

There are probably a million more things

Notion is simply documents with interesting blocks. Simple, but brilliant. For me, it can replace and consolidate things like Trello and other kanban tools, lightweight project management platforms, GitHub issues (if you don’t need the public-ness), wikis, Google Docs and Spreadsheets, and even simple one-off public websites.

Here’s a website dedicated to other people’s interesting Notion pages.

What I want from Notion

I’d love to see Notion’s web app links open in their desktop app instead of the web. I prefer the app because I have plenty of browser tabs open as it is. It’s gotta be possible to do this with a browser extension. There used to be “Paws” for Trello and there was a browser extension that would open Trello links in that app, so there is prior precedent out there.

I’d also like Notion to explore a tabs feature. I constantly need more than one document open at a time and right now the only way to do that is with multiple windows. There is some back-and-forth arrow action that’s possible, but it would be interesting to see native tabs or native window splitting somehow.

I’d love to see some performance upgrades too. It’s not terribly bad, but working in Notion is so ubiquitous and important in my day-to-day that I’d love for it to feel more instantaneous than it currently does.

The post How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

Posted on Leave a comment

How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally

I use Notion quite a bit, both personally and professionally.

In a sense, it’s just an app for keeping documents in one place: little notes, to-do lists, basic spreadsheets, etc. I like the native macOS Notes app just fine. It’s quick and easy, it’s desktop and mobile, it syncs… but there are enough limitations that I wanted something better. Plus, I wanted something team-based and web-friendly (shared URLs!) and Notion hits those nails on the head.

Here’s a bunch of ways to use Notion as well as some scattered random notes and ideas about it.

Workspaces are your teams

The word “workspace” almost makes it seem like you could or should use them as your top-level organization structure within a team. Like different projects would use different workspaces. But I’d say: don’t do that. Workspaces are teams, even if it’s a party of you and only you.

Pricing is billed by workspace. Team members are organized by workspace. Search is scoped by workspace. Switching workspaces isn’t too difficult, but it’s not lightning fast, either. I’d say it’s worth honoring those walls and keeping workspaces to a minimum. It’s almost like Slack. It’s easy to get Too-Many-Slack’d, so best to avoid getting Too-Many-Notion’d.

Meeting notes

We have a weekly all-hands meeting at CodePen where we lay out what we’ve done and what we’re going to do. It’s nice to have that as a document so it can include links, notes, comments, embeds, etc.

Those notes don’t disappear next week — we archive them as a historical record of everything we do.

Publishing and advertising schedules

I like looking at a spreadsheet-like document to see upcoming CSS-
Tricks articles with their statuses:

But that same exact document can be viewed as a calendar as well, if that’s easier to look at:

There can be all sorts of views for the same table of content, which is a terrific feature:

Knowledge bases

This might be the easiest selling point for Notion. I’m sure a lot of companies have a whole bunch of documents that get into how the company works, including employee databases, coding guidelines, deployment procedures, dashboards to other software, etc. Sometimes that works as a wiki, but I’ve never seen a lovely setup for this kind of thing. Notion works fantastically as a collaborative knowledge base.

Public documents

I can make a document public, and even open it to public comments with the flip of a switch.

Another super fun thing in Notion is applying a header image and emoji, which gives each document a lot of personality. It’s done in a way that can’t really be screwed up and made into a gross-looking document. Here’s an example where I’ve customized the page header — and look at the public URL!

I’ve also used that for job postings:

It’s also great for things like public accessibility audits where people can be sent to a public page to see what kinds of things are being worked on with the ability to comment on items.

Quick, collaborative documents

Any document can be shared. I can create a quick document and share it with a particular person easily. That could be a private document shared only with team members, or with someone totally outside the team. Or I can make the document publicly visible to all.

I use Notion to create pages to present possibilities with potential sponsorship partners, then morph that into a document to keep track of everything we’re doing together.

We use a show calendar for ShopTalk episodes. Each show added to the calendar automatically creates a page that we use as collaborative show notes with our guests.

It’s worth noting that a Notion account is required to edit a document. So anyone that’s invited will have to register and be logged in. Plus, you’ll need to share it with the correct email address so that person can associate their account with that address.

Blog post drafts

I’ve been trying to keep all my blog post drafts in Notion. That way, they can easily be shared individually and I can browse all the collected ideas at once.

Exporting posts come out as Markdown too, and that’s great for blog post drafts because it translates nicely:

Private sub-team documents

Being able to share documents with specific people is great. For example, we have a Founder’s Meetings section on CodePen:

There are probably a million more things

Notion is simply documents with interesting blocks. Simple, but brilliant. For me, it can replace and consolidate things like Trello and other kanban tools, lightweight project management platforms, GitHub issues (if you don’t need the public-ness), wikis, Google Docs and Spreadsheets, and even simple one-off public websites.

Here’s a website dedicated to other people’s interesting Notion pages.

What I want from Notion

I’d love to see Notion’s web app links open in their desktop app instead of the web. I prefer the app because I have plenty of browser tabs open as it is. It’s gotta be possible to do this with a browser extension. There used to be “Paws” for Trello and there was a browser extension that would open Trello links in that app, so there is prior precedent out there.

I’d also like Notion to explore a tabs feature. I constantly need more than one document open at a time and right now the only way to do that is with multiple windows. There is some back-and-forth arrow action that’s possible, but it would be interesting to see native tabs or native window splitting somehow.

I’d love to see some performance upgrades too. It’s not terribly bad, but working in Notion is so ubiquitous and important in my day-to-day that I’d love for it to feel more instantaneous than it currently does.

The post How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

Posted on Leave a comment

How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally

I use Notion quite a bit, both personally and professionally.

In a sense, it’s just an app for keeping documents in one place: little notes, to-do lists, basic spreadsheets, etc. I like the native macOS Notes app just fine. It’s quick and easy, it’s desktop and mobile, it syncs… but there are enough limitations that I wanted something better. Plus, I wanted something team-based and web-friendly (shared URLs!) and Notion hits those nails on the head.

Here’s a bunch of ways to use Notion as well as some scattered random notes and ideas about it.

Workspaces are your teams

The word “workspace” almost makes it seem like you could or should use them as your top-level organization structure within a team. Like different projects would use different workspaces. But I’d say: don’t do that. Workspaces are teams, even if it’s a party of you and only you.

Pricing is billed by workspace. Team members are organized by workspace. Search is scoped by workspace. Switching workspaces isn’t too difficult, but it’s not lightning fast, either. I’d say it’s worth honoring those walls and keeping workspaces to a minimum. It’s almost like Slack. It’s easy to get Too-Many-Slack’d, so best to avoid getting Too-Many-Notion’d.

Meeting notes

We have a weekly all-hands meeting at CodePen where we lay out what we’ve done and what we’re going to do. It’s nice to have that as a document so it can include links, notes, comments, embeds, etc.

Those notes don’t disappear next week — we archive them as a historical record of everything we do.

Publishing and advertising schedules

I like looking at a spreadsheet-like document to see upcoming CSS-
Tricks articles with their statuses:

But that same exact document can be viewed as a calendar as well, if that’s easier to look at:

There can be all sorts of views for the same table of content, which is a terrific feature:

Knowledge bases

This might be the easiest selling point for Notion. I’m sure a lot of companies have a whole bunch of documents that get into how the company works, including employee databases, coding guidelines, deployment procedures, dashboards to other software, etc. Sometimes that works as a wiki, but I’ve never seen a lovely setup for this kind of thing. Notion works fantastically as a collaborative knowledge base.

Public documents

I can make a document public, and even open it to public comments with the flip of a switch.

Another super fun thing in Notion is applying a header image and emoji, which gives each document a lot of personality. It’s done in a way that can’t really be screwed up and made into a gross-looking document. Here’s an example where I’ve customized the page header — and look at the public URL!

I’ve also used that for job postings:

It’s also great for things like public accessibility audits where people can be sent to a public page to see what kinds of things are being worked on with the ability to comment on items.

Quick, collaborative documents

Any document can be shared. I can create a quick document and share it with a particular person easily. That could be a private document shared only with team members, or with someone totally outside the team. Or I can make the document publicly visible to all.

I use Notion to create pages to present possibilities with potential sponsorship partners, then morph that into a document to keep track of everything we’re doing together.

We use a show calendar for ShopTalk episodes. Each show added to the calendar automatically creates a page that we use as collaborative show notes with our guests.

It’s worth noting that a Notion account is required to edit a document. So anyone that’s invited will have to register and be logged in. Plus, you’ll need to share it with the correct email address so that person can associate their account with that address.

Blog post drafts

I’ve been trying to keep all my blog post drafts in Notion. That way, they can easily be shared individually and I can browse all the collected ideas at once.

Exporting posts come out as Markdown too, and that’s great for blog post drafts because it translates nicely:

Private sub-team documents

Being able to share documents with specific people is great. For example, we have a Founder’s Meetings section on CodePen:

There are probably a million more things

Notion is simply documents with interesting blocks. Simple, but brilliant. For me, it can replace and consolidate things like Trello and other kanban tools, lightweight project management platforms, GitHub issues (if you don’t need the public-ness), wikis, Google Docs and Spreadsheets, and even simple one-off public websites.

Here’s a website dedicated to other people’s interesting Notion pages.

What I want from Notion

I’d love to see Notion’s web app links open in their desktop app instead of the web. I prefer the app because I have plenty of browser tabs open as it is. It’s gotta be possible to do this with a browser extension. There used to be “Paws” for Trello and there was a browser extension that would open Trello links in that app, so there is prior precedent out there.

I’d also like Notion to explore a tabs feature. I constantly need more than one document open at a time and right now the only way to do that is with multiple windows. There is some back-and-forth arrow action that’s possible, but it would be interesting to see native tabs or native window splitting somehow.

I’d love to see some performance upgrades too. It’s not terribly bad, but working in Notion is so ubiquitous and important in my day-to-day that I’d love for it to feel more instantaneous than it currently does.

The post How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

Posted on Leave a comment

How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally

I use Notion quite a bit, both personally and professionally.

In a sense, it’s just an app for keeping documents in one place: little notes, to-do lists, basic spreadsheets, etc. I like the native macOS Notes app just fine. It’s quick and easy, it’s desktop and mobile, it syncs… but there are enough limitations that I wanted something better. Plus, I wanted something team-based and web-friendly (shared URLs!) and Notion hits those nails on the head.

Here’s a bunch of ways to use Notion as well as some scattered random notes and ideas about it.

Workspaces are your teams

The word “workspace” almost makes it seem like you could or should use them as your top-level organization structure within a team. Like different projects would use different workspaces. But I’d say: don’t do that. Workspaces are teams, even if it’s a party of you and only you.

Pricing is billed by workspace. Team members are organized by workspace. Search is scoped by workspace. Switching workspaces isn’t too difficult, but it’s not lightning fast, either. I’d say it’s worth honoring those walls and keeping workspaces to a minimum. It’s almost like Slack. It’s easy to get Too-Many-Slack’d, so best to avoid getting Too-Many-Notion’d.

Meeting notes

We have a weekly all-hands meeting at CodePen where we lay out what we’ve done and what we’re going to do. It’s nice to have that as a document so it can include links, notes, comments, embeds, etc.

Those notes don’t disappear next week — we archive them as a historical record of everything we do.

Publishing and advertising schedules

I like looking at a spreadsheet-like document to see upcoming CSS-
Tricks articles with their statuses:

But that same exact document can be viewed as a calendar as well, if that’s easier to look at:

There can be all sorts of views for the same table of content, which is a terrific feature:

Knowledge bases

This might be the easiest selling point for Notion. I’m sure a lot of companies have a whole bunch of documents that get into how the company works, including employee databases, coding guidelines, deployment procedures, dashboards to other software, etc. Sometimes that works as a wiki, but I’ve never seen a lovely setup for this kind of thing. Notion works fantastically as a collaborative knowledge base.

Public documents

I can make a document public, and even open it to public comments with the flip of a switch.

Another super fun thing in Notion is applying a header image and emoji, which gives each document a lot of personality. It’s done in a way that can’t really be screwed up and made into a gross-looking document. Here’s an example where I’ve customized the page header — and look at the public URL!

I’ve also used that for job postings:

It’s also great for things like public accessibility audits where people can be sent to a public page to see what kinds of things are being worked on with the ability to comment on items.

Quick, collaborative documents

Any document can be shared. I can create a quick document and share it with a particular person easily. That could be a private document shared only with team members, or with someone totally outside the team. Or I can make the document publicly visible to all.

I use Notion to create pages to present possibilities with potential sponsorship partners, then morph that into a document to keep track of everything we’re doing together.

We use a show calendar for ShopTalk episodes. Each show added to the calendar automatically creates a page that we use as collaborative show notes with our guests.

It’s worth noting that a Notion account is required to edit a document. So anyone that’s invited will have to register and be logged in. Plus, you’ll need to share it with the correct email address so that person can associate their account with that address.

Blog post drafts

I’ve been trying to keep all my blog post drafts in Notion. That way, they can easily be shared individually and I can browse all the collected ideas at once.

Exporting posts come out as Markdown too, and that’s great for blog post drafts because it translates nicely:

Private sub-team documents

Being able to share documents with specific people is great. For example, we have a Founder’s Meetings section on CodePen:

There are probably a million more things

Notion is simply documents with interesting blocks. Simple, but brilliant. For me, it can replace and consolidate things like Trello and other kanban tools, lightweight project management platforms, GitHub issues (if you don’t need the public-ness), wikis, Google Docs and Spreadsheets, and even simple one-off public websites.

Here’s a website dedicated to other people’s interesting Notion pages.

What I want from Notion

I’d love to see Notion’s web app links open in their desktop app instead of the web. I prefer the app because I have plenty of browser tabs open as it is. It’s gotta be possible to do this with a browser extension. There used to be “Paws” for Trello and there was a browser extension that would open Trello links in that app, so there is prior precedent out there.

I’d also like Notion to explore a tabs feature. I constantly need more than one document open at a time and right now the only way to do that is with multiple windows. There is some back-and-forth arrow action that’s possible, but it would be interesting to see native tabs or native window splitting somehow.

I’d love to see some performance upgrades too. It’s not terribly bad, but working in Notion is so ubiquitous and important in my day-to-day that I’d love for it to feel more instantaneous than it currently does.

The post How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

Posted on Leave a comment

How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally

I use Notion quite a bit, both personally and professionally.

In a sense, it’s just an app for keeping documents in one place: little notes, to-do lists, basic spreadsheets, etc. I like the native macOS Notes app just fine. It’s quick and easy, it’s desktop and mobile, it syncs… but there are enough limitations that I wanted something better. Plus, I wanted something team-based and web-friendly (shared URLs!) and Notion hits those nails on the head.

Here’s a bunch of ways to use Notion as well as some scattered random notes and ideas about it.

Workspaces are your teams

The word “workspace” almost makes it seem like you could or should use them as your top-level organization structure within a team. Like different projects would use different workspaces. But I’d say: don’t do that. Workspaces are teams, even if it’s a party of you and only you.

Pricing is billed by workspace. Team members are organized by workspace. Search is scoped by workspace. Switching workspaces isn’t too difficult, but it’s not lightning fast, either. I’d say it’s worth honoring those walls and keeping workspaces to a minimum. It’s almost like Slack. It’s easy to get Too-Many-Slack’d, so best to avoid getting Too-Many-Notion’d.

Meeting notes

We have a weekly all-hands meeting at CodePen where we lay out what we’ve done and what we’re going to do. It’s nice to have that as a document so it can include links, notes, comments, embeds, etc.

Those notes don’t disappear next week — we archive them as a historical record of everything we do.

Publishing and advertising schedules

I like looking at a spreadsheet-like document to see upcoming CSS-
Tricks articles with their statuses:

But that same exact document can be viewed as a calendar as well, if that’s easier to look at:

There can be all sorts of views for the same table of content, which is a terrific feature:

Knowledge bases

This might be the easiest selling point for Notion. I’m sure a lot of companies have a whole bunch of documents that get into how the company works, including employee databases, coding guidelines, deployment procedures, dashboards to other software, etc. Sometimes that works as a wiki, but I’ve never seen a lovely setup for this kind of thing. Notion works fantastically as a collaborative knowledge base.

Public documents

I can make a document public, and even open it to public comments with the flip of a switch.

Another super fun thing in Notion is applying a header image and emoji, which gives each document a lot of personality. It’s done in a way that can’t really be screwed up and made into a gross-looking document. Here’s an example where I’ve customized the page header — and look at the public URL!

I’ve also used that for job postings:

It’s also great for things like public accessibility audits where people can be sent to a public page to see what kinds of things are being worked on with the ability to comment on items.

Quick, collaborative documents

Any document can be shared. I can create a quick document and share it with a particular person easily. That could be a private document shared only with team members, or with someone totally outside the team. Or I can make the document publicly visible to all.

I use Notion to create pages to present possibilities with potential sponsorship partners, then morph that into a document to keep track of everything we’re doing together.

We use a show calendar for ShopTalk episodes. Each show added to the calendar automatically creates a page that we use as collaborative show notes with our guests.

It’s worth noting that a Notion account is required to edit a document. So anyone that’s invited will have to register and be logged in. Plus, you’ll need to share it with the correct email address so that person can associate their account with that address.

Blog post drafts

I’ve been trying to keep all my blog post drafts in Notion. That way, they can easily be shared individually and I can browse all the collected ideas at once.

Exporting posts come out as Markdown too, and that’s great for blog post drafts because it translates nicely:

Private sub-team documents

Being able to share documents with specific people is great. For example, we have a Founder’s Meetings section on CodePen:

There are probably a million more things

Notion is simply documents with interesting blocks. Simple, but brilliant. For me, it can replace and consolidate things like Trello and other kanban tools, lightweight project management platforms, GitHub issues (if you don’t need the public-ness), wikis, Google Docs and Spreadsheets, and even simple one-off public websites.

Here’s a website dedicated to other people’s interesting Notion pages.

What I want from Notion

I’d love to see Notion’s web app links open in their desktop app instead of the web. I prefer the app because I have plenty of browser tabs open as it is. It’s gotta be possible to do this with a browser extension. There used to be “Paws” for Trello and there was a browser extension that would open Trello links in that app, so there is prior precedent out there.

I’d also like Notion to explore a tabs feature. I constantly need more than one document open at a time and right now the only way to do that is with multiple windows. There is some back-and-forth arrow action that’s possible, but it would be interesting to see native tabs or native window splitting somehow.

I’d love to see some performance upgrades too. It’s not terribly bad, but working in Notion is so ubiquitous and important in my day-to-day that I’d love for it to feel more instantaneous than it currently does.

The post How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

CSS-Tricks

Posted on Leave a comment

How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally

I use Notion quite a bit, both personally and professionally.

In a sense, it’s just an app for keeping documents in one place: little notes, to-do lists, basic spreadsheets, etc. I like the native macOS Notes app just fine. It’s quick and easy, it’s desktop and mobile, it syncs… but there are enough limitations that I wanted something better. Plus, I wanted something team-based and web-friendly (shared URLs!) and Notion hits those nails on the head.

Here’s a bunch of ways to use Notion as well as some scattered random notes and ideas about it.

Workspaces are your teams

The word “workspace” almost makes it seem like you could or should use them as your top-level organization structure within a team. Like different projects would use different workspaces. But I’d say: don’t do that. Workspaces are teams, even if it’s a party of you and only you.

Pricing is billed by workspace. Team members are organized by workspace. Search is scoped by workspace. Switching workspaces isn’t too difficult, but it’s not lightning fast, either. I’d say it’s worth honoring those walls and keeping workspaces to a minimum. It’s almost like Slack. It’s easy to get Too-Many-Slack’d, so best to avoid getting Too-Many-Notion’d.

Meeting notes

We have a weekly all-hands meeting at CodePen where we lay out what we’ve done and what we’re going to do. It’s nice to have that as a document so it can include links, notes, comments, embeds, etc.

Those notes don’t disappear next week — we archive them as a historical record of everything we do.

Publishing and advertising schedules

I like looking at a spreadsheet-like document to see upcoming CSS-
Tricks articles with their statuses:

But that same exact document can be viewed as a calendar as well, if that’s easier to look at:

There can be all sorts of views for the same table of content, which is a terrific feature:

Knowledge bases

This might be the easiest selling point for Notion. I’m sure a lot of companies have a whole bunch of documents that get into how the company works, including employee databases, coding guidelines, deployment procedures, dashboards to other software, etc. Sometimes that works as a wiki, but I’ve never seen a lovely setup for this kind of thing. Notion works fantastically as a collaborative knowledge base.

Public documents

I can make a document public, and even open it to public comments with the flip of a switch.

Another super fun thing in Notion is applying a header image and emoji, which gives each document a lot of personality. It’s done in a way that can’t really be screwed up and made into a gross-looking document. Here’s an example where I’ve customized the page header — and look at the public URL!

I’ve also used that for job postings:

It’s also great for things like public accessibility audits where people can be sent to a public page to see what kinds of things are being worked on with the ability to comment on items.

Quick, collaborative documents

Any document can be shared. I can create a quick document and share it with a particular person easily. That could be a private document shared only with team members, or with someone totally outside the team. Or I can make the document publicly visible to all.

I use Notion to create pages to present possibilities with potential sponsorship partners, then morph that into a document to keep track of everything we’re doing together.

We use a show calendar for ShopTalk episodes. Each show added to the calendar automatically creates a page that we use as collaborative show notes with our guests.

It’s worth noting that a Notion account is required to edit a document. So anyone that’s invited will have to register and be logged in. Plus, you’ll need to share it with the correct email address so that person can associate their account with that address.

Blog post drafts

I’ve been trying to keep all my blog post drafts in Notion. That way, they can easily be shared individually and I can browse all the collected ideas at once.

Exporting posts come out as Markdown too, and that’s great for blog post drafts because it translates nicely:

Private sub-team documents

Being able to share documents with specific people is great. For example, we have a Founder’s Meetings section on CodePen:

There are probably a million more things

Notion is simply documents with interesting blocks. Simple, but brilliant. For me, it can replace and consolidate things like Trello and other kanban tools, lightweight project management platforms, GitHub issues (if you don’t need the public-ness), wikis, Google Docs and Spreadsheets, and even simple one-off public websites.

Here’s a website dedicated to other people’s interesting Notion pages.

What I want from Notion

I’d love to see Notion’s web app links open in their desktop app instead of the web. I prefer the app because I have plenty of browser tabs open as it is. It’s gotta be possible to do this with a browser extension. There used to be “Paws” for Trello and there was a browser extension that would open Trello links in that app, so there is prior precedent out there.

I’d also like Notion to explore a tabs feature. I constantly need more than one document open at a time and right now the only way to do that is with multiple windows. There is some back-and-forth arrow action that’s possible, but it would be interesting to see native tabs or native window splitting somehow.

I’d love to see some performance upgrades too. It’s not terribly bad, but working in Notion is so ubiquitous and important in my day-to-day that I’d love for it to feel more instantaneous than it currently does.

The post How I’ve Been Using Notion Personally and Professionally appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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